If You Want to Walk on Water, You've Got to Get Out of the Boat

Overview

You’re one step away from the adventure of your life

Deep within you lies the same faith and longing that sent Peter walking across the wind-swept Sea of Galilee toward Jesus.

In what ways is the Lord telling you, as he did Peter, “Come”?

John Ortberg invites you to consider the incredible potential that awaits you outside your comfort zone. Out on the risky waters of faith, Jesus is waiting to meet you in ...

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Overview

You’re one step away from the adventure of your life

Deep within you lies the same faith and longing that sent Peter walking across the wind-swept Sea of Galilee toward Jesus.

In what ways is the Lord telling you, as he did Peter, “Come”?

John Ortberg invites you to consider the incredible potential that awaits you outside your comfort zone. Out on the risky waters of faith, Jesus is waiting to meet you in ways that will change you forever, deepening your character and your trust in God. The experience is terrifying. It’s thrilling beyond belief. It’s everything you’d expect of someone worthy to be called Lord.

The choice is yours to know him as only a water-walker can, aligning yourself with God’s purpose for your life in the process. There’s just one requirement:

If you want to walk on water, you’ve got to get out of the boat

"John Ortberg is profound without being heavy." — Dallas Willard, author, The Divine Conspiracy

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Singer, speaker and author Walsh (Stories from the River of Mercy) tenderly gives voice to the unspeakable fears and sorrows that consume even the most stalwart Christians. Walsh advocates bravely confronting the demons of the unknown by opposing fears with faith in the unchanging, dependable character of a God who promises to meet every need. In the midst of fearful emotional and mental wandering, Walsh asserts, searching for reasons for life's tragedies can only compound one's miseries. She suggests a different track for achieving and maintaining courageous peace, by honestly exposing innate human frailties. Then, she says, Christians can surrender to God's plan as the jumping-off place to genuine fearless living. This book's titular premise to live fearlessly is discussed through three converging paths: truth-telling, fear-facing and soulful peace gained by relinquishment. Walsh challenges readers to let go of the illusion of control, embracing God's wisdom through uncertainty and finding freedom in a plan beyond understanding. Through her speaking role with the Women of Faith conferences, Walsh has conversed with many women who have suffered deep pain, and she skillfully recounts their poignant stories of freedom from fear. Walsh says that such stories challenge her to live life with a similar bold trust in God's sovereignty and provision. The author's generous and humorous personal experiences bring balance to an otherwise heavy subject. Walsh's call to a faith-based journey toward courage will inspire Christians to free themselves from fear. (Jan.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781491545737
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio
  • Publication date: 12/16/2014
  • Format: MP3 on CD
  • Product dimensions: 5.25 (w) x 6.75 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

John Ortberg is a pastor at Menlo Park Presbyterian Church in Menlo Park, California. He is the bestselling author of God is Closer Than You Think; The Life You’ve Always Wanted; Everybody’s Normal Till You Get To Know Them; If You Want to Walk on Water, You’ve Got to Get Out of the Boat; Love Beyond Reason; and (with Kevin Harney) the multimedia curriculum Old Testament Challenge. He and his wife, Nancy, have three children.
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Read an Excerpt


If You Want to Walk on Water, You've Got to Get Out of the Boat Participant's Guide

A 6-Session Journey on Learning to Trust God

By John Ortberg Zondervan
Copyright © 2003
Zondervan
All right reserved.


ISBN: 0310250560


 

Chapter One What's Water-Walking? Session One There is something-Someone-inside us who tells us there is more to life than sitting in the boat. You were made for something more.... There is something inside you that wants to walk on the water-to leave the comfort of routine existence and abandon yourself to the high adventure of following God. -John Ortberg Questions to Think About 1. What kinds of things do you trust in, especially when life gets stormy, that help you feel comfortable and secure rather than fearful? Be honest! 2. Explain why you do or do not believe that God calls everyone who follows him to step out in faith and do something extraordinary. What does "stepping out in faith" look like? 3. How would you define failure? 4. Thus far in life, what has been your experience with failure? What has failure kept you from doing? What has failure done for you? Video Observations Images of a balloon ride Following Jesus: choosing between comfort and growth Did Peter fail-or succeed? Discovering the power of Jesus Video Highlights 1. When John Ortberg and his wife took their hot-air balloon ride, the competence of their pilot became very important to them. Why is it so important for us to know thecompetence and trustworthiness of whoever pilots our lives? 2. Jesus invited Peter to step out of the boat and walk with him-to do something Peter could not do on his own-and Peter couldn't resist the opportunity. Jesus is still looking for people who love and trust him enough to step out of the boat. What do you find intriguing about stepping out of the boat? 3. What are your thoughts on John Ortberg's comments about failure, particularly that failure has more to do with the way we view the outcome of an event than what actually happened? Large Group Exploration An Adventure in the Dark Let's take a closer look at what happened when Jesus revealed himself to his disciples as they sailed across the stormy Sea of Galilee, because that event matters a great deal to us today. We too have the opportunity to walk with Jesus in places we wouldn't dream of going on our own. Like each of the disciples, we must choose how we will respond to God. Will we sit in the boat, like the eleven disciples? Or will we, like Peter, leave the security of the boat and give God the opportunity to use us in extraordinary ways? 1. When Jesus told the disciples to sail to the other side of the Sea of Galilee without him, they obeyed. But what happened as they sailed? (See Matthew 14:22-26; Mark 6:45-50.) 2. What did Jesus say to them, and why is this significant today? (See Matthew 14:27.) 3. From Peter's perspective, recap what happened after Jesus told the disciples who he was. What is significant about Peter's response to Jesus? (See Matthew 14:28-32.) 4. What impact did this event have on the disciples? (See Matthew 14:33; Mark 6:51.) 5. What impact do you think this event had on Peter? Who Deserves the Credit? It's not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena ... who, at best, knows in the end the triumph of great achievement, and who, at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly. So that his place will never be with those cold timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat. -Theodore Roosevelt Highlights from the History of Water-Walking For a very long time God has been in the business of inviting people to be water-walkers. Here are a few examples to consider: Person Water-Walking The Result Invitation Abraham Sacrifice his son Isaac. God honored Abraham's (See Genesis 22.) faith and provided a ram for the sacrifice. Moses Lead the Israelites out of God parted the Red Sea, Egypt, which meant allowing the Israelites to crossing the Red Sea cross on dry land, then with the Egyptian army drowned the Egyptian in hot pursuit. (See army. Exodus 3:7-10 and chapter 14.) Joshua Lead the Israelites across As soon as the priests' the flooded Jordan River feet touched the water with the ark of the of the Jordan River, it covenant carried by the stopped flowing and the priests at the front of the people crossed on dry people. (See Joshua 3.) land. Joshua Instead of going into God made the wall of battle, the Israelites were Jericho fall down so that to march around the the Israelites could overtake walled city of Jericho the city-the first with the ark of the key barrier to entering covenant for six days, the Promised Land. then march around the city seven times on the seventh day and blow horns and shout when the trumpet sounded. (See Joshua 6.) Twelve spies Believe that despite the Ten of them refused to frightening obstacles in believe God and his Canaan, God would be promises and perished faithful to give the in the wilderness. Israelites the Promised Land and all of its goodness. (See Numbers 13-14.) Rich young ruler Give up his material He refused and went possessions and follow away saddened. We do Jesus. (See Matthew not know what took 19:16-22.) place in his life. Small Group Exploration Topic A Where Do We Place Our Trust When We Are Afraid? God knows how fearful we are, and he sometimes uses uncomfortable, real-world challenges to cause us to choose where we will place our trust. John Ortberg explains it this way: "The decision to grow [spiritually] always involves a choice between risk and comfort. This means that to be a follower of Jesus you must renounce comfort as the ultimate value of your life." Let's explore what God says about fear and choosing where we place our trust. 1. What happens when we place our trust in "boats" of our own making instead of placing our trust in God? (See Psalm 49:1-13.) 2. What did David realize about finding security in God rather than in things? (See Psalm 20:6-7; 118:6-9.) 3. What do the following verses reveal about God? a. Psalm 18:1-3 b. Psalm 56:3-4 c. Jeremiah 17:7-8 4. What has God said to his people over and over again, and why do you think he repeated it? (See Genesis 15:1; 21:17; Joshua 8:1; Daniel 10:12.) Topic B What Happened When These People Got Out of Their Boats? The Bible records the stories of many people who had to choose whether to trust God and step out in faith. Let's explore what happened to two men who, like Peter, decided to trust God and leave behind the security, comfort, and safety they had tried to provide for themselves. Moses 1. What happened when Moses-the adopted son of the Pharaoh's daughter-took matters into his own hands when he saw an Israelite being mistreated by an Egyptian? (See Exodus 2:10-15; 3:1.) 2. How did God appear to Moses, and what did he want Moses to do? (See Exodus 3:1-4, 9-10.) 3. How did Moses respond when God presented the invitation to step out of the boat? (See Exodus 3:11-13; 4:13.) 4. Finally Moses took the plunge and returned to Egypt to urge Pharaoh to let the Israelites go. What happened as a result of God's power and the shepherd's water-walking obedience? (See Exodus 12:31-37.) Gideon 5. Where was Gideon trying to find comfort and safety when God approached him? (See Judges 6:11.) 6. Gideon was afraid to take the challenge the angel of the Lord presented to him. How did God respond to his fears? (See Judges 6:12-18; 7:9-15.) 7. How did God use this "insignificant" farmer who finally decided to obey and trust him? (See Judges 7:16-24.) The Pluses of Water-Walking It is the only way to real growth. It is the way true faith develops. It is the alternative to boredom and stagnation. It is part of discovering and obeying our calling. The water is where Jesus is! Group Discussion 1. Fear of failure is one reason many of us don't step out of the boat. Some people view Peter's walk on the water as a failure, but John Ortberg points out that there were eleven bigger failures sitting in the boat. In what ways does our perception of failure affect our willingness to start water-walking? Think about It Failure is not an event, but rather a judgment about an event. Failure is not something that happens to us or a label we attach to things. It is a way we think about outcomes. -John Ortberg 2. How much does our view of God's character and competence influence the degree to which we are willing to trust him and, in faith, to accept his calling and take risks? 3. Would you agree that sometimes the "boats" we create-whatever gives us an illusion of control, whatever or whomever (besides God) we are tempted to put our trust in when life is stormy-might actually be more dangerous than water-walking with Jesus? Why or why not? 4. If we keep choosing not to step out of our boats, what happens to us? To people around us? To our relationship with God? Personal Journey: To Do Now 1. In If You Want to Walk on Water, You've Got to Get Out of the Boat, John Ortberg writes, "I believe that there is some aspect of your life in which God is calling you to walk with and to him, and that when we say yes to his calling, it sets in motion a divine dynamic far beyond merely human power." In what ways might God be calling you to get out of your "boat" and step out in faith? 2. Usually anyone who begins water-walking has to face personal fear. What deep fears keep you from really walking with and obeying God, from stepping out in faith and with his help doing what you could never do on your own? List fears that are specific to the calling you wrote down for question 1. 3. Looking back on your life so far, when have you said no to God's call? When have you said yes? Why? What happened as a result of those choices? 4. Which small or large steps can you begin taking this week to get out of your boat a little each day? Personal Journey: To Do on Your Own You've learned a few basics about water-walking and have been encouraged to think about your choices, your boats, and the opportunity to water-walk. It's easy to seek comfort and create boats, isn't it? That's why so many people choose that path. But God is calling you, as he calls every believer, to put your faith in him and start getting out of your boat a little more each day. Set aside some quiet time to think about the following questions. There are no right or wrong answers, and nobody needs to know your responses, unless you choose to discuss them with someone. What's important is that you take time to reflect on some issues that you explored today, issues that may cause you to become uncomfortable or even a bit angry-at yourself, God, or someone else.

Continues...


Excerpted from If You Want to Walk on Water, You've Got to Get Out of the Boat Participant's Guide by John Ortberg Copyright © 2003 by Zondervan
Excerpted by permission. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
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Table of Contents

Chapter 1 On Water-Walking 8
Chapter 2 Boat Potatoes 13
Chapter 3 Discerning the Call 22
Chapter 4 Walking on the Water 30
Chapter 5 Seeing the Wind 48
Chapter 6 Crying Out in Fear 60
Chapter 7 That Sinking Feeling 77
Chapter 8 Focusing on Jesus 94
Chapter 9 Learning to Wait 105
Chapter 10 How Big Is Your God? 112
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First Chapter

On Water-Walking
Some years ago my wife arranged for us to ride in a hot-air balloon as a birthday gift. We went to the field where the balloons ascended and got into a little basket with one other couple. We introduced ourselves and swapped vocational information. Then our pilot began the ascent. The day had just dawned---clear, crisp, cloudless. We could see the entire Canejo Valley, from craggy canyons to the Pacific Ocean. It was scenic, inspiring, and majestic.
But I also experienced one emotion I had not anticipated. Want to guess?
Fear.
I had always thought those baskets went about chest high, but this one only came up to our knees. One good lurch would be enough to throw someone over the side. So I held on with grim determination and white knuckles.
I looked over at my wife, who does not care for heights at all, and relaxed a bit, knowing there was someone in the basket more tense than I was. I could tell, because she would not move---at all. During part of our flight there was a horse ranch on the ground directly behind her. I pointed it out because she loves horses, and, without turning around or even pivoting her head, she simply rolled her eyes back as far as she could and said, 'Yes, it's beautiful.'
About this time I decided I'd like to get to know the kid who was flying this balloon. I realized that I could try to psyche myself up into believing everything would be fine, but the truth was we had placed our lives and destinies in the hands of the pilot. Everything depended on his character and competence.
I asked him what he did for a living and how he got started flying hot-air balloons. I was hoping for his former job to be one full of responsibilities---a neurosurgeon, perhaps, an astronaut who missed going up into space.
I knew we were in trouble when his response to me began, 'Dude, it's like this...'
He did not even have a job! He mostly surfed.
He said the reason he got started flying hot-air balloons was that he had been driving around in his pickup when he'd had too much to drink, crashed the truck, and badly injured his brother. His brother still couldn't get around too well, so watching hot-air balloons gave him something to do.
'By the way,' he added,'if things get a little choppy on the way down, don't be surprised. I've never flown this particular balloon before, and I'm not sure how it's going to handle the descent.'
My wife looked over at me and said, 'You mean to tell me we are a thousand feet up in the air with an unemployed surfer who started flying hot-air balloons because he got drunk, crashed a pickup, injured his brother, and has never been in this one before and doesn't know how to bring it down?'
Then the wife of the other couple looked at me and spoke---the only words either of them were to utter throughout the entire flight.
You're a pastor. Do something religious.
So I took an offering.
The great question at a moment like that is, Can I trust the pilot?
I could try telling myself that everything would turn out okay. Facing the flight with a positive attitude would certainly make it a more pleasant journey. But the journey would be over soon. And the real issue concerned the dude who was flying this thing. Were his character and competence such that I could confidently place my destiny in his hands?
Or, was it time to do something religious?
Every day you and I take another leg of our journey in this giant balloon that's whirling around a vast universe. We only get one trip. I long to take it with an enormous spirit of adventure and risk---and I'll bet you do, too.
But it's a pretty uncertain ride sometimes. I wish the walls to my basket went up a little higher. I wish the balloon was a little thicker. I wonder how my little ride will end up. I'm not sure how it will handle on the way down.
I can try to psyche myself up for taking chances and believing everything will turn out okay. But the real question is, Is there somebody piloting this thing? And are his character and competence such that he can be trusted? Because if they're not, I don't want to take a chance. My story, like every human story, is, at least in part, the struggle between faith and fear.
Because of this, I have found myself drawn for many years to the story of Peter getting out of the boat and walking on the water with Christ. It is one of the greatest pictures of extreme discipleship in Scripture. In the following chapters we will take a close look at each detail of this story for what it teaches us about water-walking. But for the rest of this chapter, let's get an aerial overview. What goes into the making of a water-walker?
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