The Iliad

The Iliad

3.6 208
by Barry B. Powell, Barry B Homer, Ian Morris
     
 

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The Iliad is a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma, for which Barry Powell, one of the twenty-first century's leading Homeric scholars, has given us a magnificent new translation. Graceful, lucid, and energetic, Powell's translation renders the Homeric Greek with a simplicity and dignity reminiscent of the original. The text immediately engrosses

Overview

The Iliad is a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma, for which Barry Powell, one of the twenty-first century's leading Homeric scholars, has given us a magnificent new translation. Graceful, lucid, and energetic, Powell's translation renders the Homeric Greek with a simplicity and dignity reminiscent of the original. The text immediately engrosses students with its tight and balanced rhythms, while the incantatory repetitions evoke a continuous "stream of sound" that offers as good an impression of Homer's Greek as one could hope to attain without learning the language. Accessible, poetic, and accurate, Powell's translation is an excellent fit for today's students. With swift, transparent language that rings both ancient and modern, it exposes them to all of the rage, pleasure, pathos, and humor that are Homer's Iliad. Both the translation and the introduction are informed by the best recent scholarship. FEATURES * Uses well-modulated verse and accurate English that is contemporary but never without dignity * Powell's introduction sets the poem in its philological, mythological, and historical contexts * Features unique on-page notes, facilitating students' engagement with the poem * Embedded illustrations accompanied by extensive captions provide Greek and Roman visual sources for key passages in each of the poem's twenty-four books * Eight maps (the most of any available translation) provide geographic context for the poem's many place names * Audio recordings (read by Powell) of fifteen important passages are available at www.oup.com/us/powell and indicated in the text margin by an icon

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Magnetically readable." —Booklist, starred review

"Homer's raw and violent Iliad remains as timeless and beautiful as the myth itself...highly recommended." —Choice

"[A] clear and energetic translation.... Staying true to Homer's poetic rhythms, Powell avoids the modified iambic lines found in Lattimore's, Fagles's, and Mitchell's works. He also avoids Lombardo's tendency to cast Homer in contemporary language and Fitzgerald's anachronisms. This fine version of The Iliad has a feel for the Greek but is more accessible than Verity's translation." —Library Journal

"Barry Powell, the master of classical mythology, has done it again—a powerful translation of the poem that started European literature. His muscular verses are faithful to the original Greek but bring the characters to life. This is a page-turner, bound to become the new standard translation." —Ian Morris, author of Why the West Rules—for Now

"This fine translation of the Iliad uses well-modulated verse and accurate English that is contemporary but never without dignity. It gives the modern reader as good an impression of Homer's sonorous Greek as one could hope to attain without learning the language; its execution is faithful in spirit to the poet, who composed his great epic orally without the use of writing. Both the translation and the introduction are consistently informed by the best recent scholarship. This translation deserves a very warm welcome." —Richard Janko, Gerald F. Else Distinguished University Professor of Classical Studies, University of Michigan

"Barry Powell's clever translation is simple and energetic: sometimes coarse, sometimes flowing, it is always poetically engaged. This is a harsh, straightforward, and often brutal world of aristocratic warriors whose values are unambiguous, priorities fixed, and sensibilities basic. Fresh and eminently readable, Powell's Iliad is likely to stay." —Margalit Finkelberg, Professor of Classics, University of Tel Aviv, and editor of The Homer Encyclopedia

"Barry Powell, a published poet and novelist, has produced an Iliad translation for the 21st century. Powell's translation beautifully conveys Homer's direct, yet often archaic, style; the introduction and notes situate the poem in its historical and literary context, so that a reader—specialist or otherwise—can appreciate the poem both as a product of its time and as a timeless work exercising its fascination in shifting ways on generations of readers for nearly 3,000 years." —John Bennet, Professor of Aegean Archaeology, University of Sheffield

"Powell's translation renders the Homeric Greek with a simplicity and dignity reminiscent of the original: graceful, matter of fact, poetic in a pleasantly understated way. Lucid and fast, the text immediately engrosses the reader, with a tight and balanced rhythm that sings, and with a closeness to the original that allows the reader to hear the incantatory repetitions in the Greek. More accessible than Lattimore, more poetic than Lombardo, and more accurate than Fagles or Fitzgerald, this translation is an excellent fit for today's students." —William A. Johnson, Professor of Classical Studies, Duke University

"With swift, transparent language that rings both ancient and modern, Barry Powell gives readers anew all of the rage, pleasure, pathos, and humor that are Homer's Iliad—a reading experience richly illumined by the insightful commentary and plentiful images accompanying the text." —Jane Alison, author of The Love-Artist

"Comprehensive and authoritative . . . highly recommended." —Choice

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780199326129
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Publication date:
09/17/2013
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
576
File size:
10 MB

Meet the Author

Barry B. Powell is the Halls-Bascom Professor of Classics Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

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The Iliad 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 208 reviews.
Rumination More than 1 year ago
It is strange reading a classical Greek story invoking the Roman names of the Gods. Surely there are better translations.
Guest More than 1 year ago
One of the greatest stories that Homer has ever told is The Iliad. It is a historical fiction that was told by Homer, a blind story tell. He told it more than 2,000 years ago in Greece. Most of the characters in his story come from Greece. This story takes place in Troy. At the time, Sparta and itâ¿¿s allies were fighting Troy and its allies. Homer gives great details on what happens and where a scene is happening and that really helped me read this story. One of the main characters, Achilles, was my favorite because he was brave, strong, and everyone liked him accept King Agamemnon. He took his lover away, which makes Troy almost defeat Sparta because Achilles asked Zeus take make Troy win Intel The king gives back his lover. There is also a lot of Greek Mythology like the gods and many of the creatures of ancient Greece like some of the hell hounds and Medusa . The theme of this story is about how hatred can make you do unbelievable things that can be good and bad. I think think that is the theme because in the story many men become hateful and they do crazy things and eventually get punished. One of the things I didnâ¿¿t like in this story was that it would always tell you to much about the simplest things, and it is a complicated read. I would recommend this book for anyone who is a good reader and someone that likes Greek Mythology. Much more happens in this story but if you want to find out then youâ¿¿ll have to read it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this book and the odyssey too. Must read it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The beginning was a little confusing. But once you got into it it's not that confusing anymore. As long as you know Greek Mythology. I mean I'm in 6th grade and I inow quite a lot of Greek Mythology.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This work is one of the most influential in the Western corpus, and that we even have a written record of it is a stroke of luck. PLEASE, this is NOT a 'book', it is a POEM that was written in verse, almost certainly by more than one person.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The paragraph format makes the story much more readable. The verse format would do things arbitrarily cut a sentence in the middle for no apparent reason 'in English anyways' and start a new line with the remainder of the sentence. It makes no sense to preserve the verse form when the verse qualities are lost in translation.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'm glad I didn't spend money on this; it's full of typos. I won't even ask why the reviews are spammed with PJO roleplayers.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A Night fury pounces onto you.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
JUST WASTES SPACE! The first fifteen pages are copyrights and blank whit space, AND THE REST OF IT LOOKS LIKE SOMEONE JUST PRESSED RANDOM BUTTONS ON THEIR KEYBOARD!!!!! THERE ARE LIKE THREE READABLE PARAGRAPHS!!!!!!!!!!! DONT GET!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! WOULD RATE ZERO IF I COULD!!!!!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Herp de
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Snapped out of his sleep. ~What's wrong?~ he asked.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Whimpered feebly a her neck still bleeds.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sighed
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Um..... why does saphira have a rider crush (Johnson) when she already has a rider( zach)? Im really confused.....
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
He looks around. "I'm Pier..."
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sorry i left! I ha stuf to do
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The little black-scaled dragon sat down with a huff, pale smoke curling into the sky. Her glance around the clearing took in many human figures, but she wasn't sure hiw to talk to them. She could hear and understand them, but she couldn't speak thier language. The hatchling could only squeak and chirrup. She huffed again, sending yet more smoke spiraling upwards.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
He dozed silently on a rock, hands behind his head.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Get out and go to the bios. We need recruits. Stop binh here when it is not activemore info at first res.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Flys in and sits in her corner watching
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sorry I wasn't active lately, but I will be one tonight! Sorry!))
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Was followed by a feminie scream
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Stared at the mini Storm.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago