Iliad of Homer (Lombardo translation) / Edition 1

Iliad of Homer (Lombardo translation) / Edition 1

4.8 5
by Homer, Sheila Murnaghan
     
 

ISBN-10: 0872203522

ISBN-13: 9780872203525

Pub. Date: 03/01/1997

Publisher: Hackett Publishing Company, Inc.

Gripping. . . . Lombardo's achievement is all the more striking when you consider the difficulties of his task. . . . [He] manages to be respectful of Homer's dire spirit while providing on nearly every page some wonderfully fresh refashioning of his Greek. The result is a vivid and disarmingly hardbitten reworking of a great classic. --Daniel Mendelsohn,

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Overview

Gripping. . . . Lombardo's achievement is all the more striking when you consider the difficulties of his task. . . . [He] manages to be respectful of Homer's dire spirit while providing on nearly every page some wonderfully fresh refashioning of his Greek. The result is a vivid and disarmingly hardbitten reworking of a great classic. --Daniel Mendelsohn, The New York Times Book Review

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780872203525
Publisher:
Hackett Publishing Company, Inc.
Publication date:
03/01/1997
Series:
HPC Classics Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
574
Sales rank:
63,846
Product dimensions:
5.48(w) x 8.44(h) x 0.98(d)

Table of Contents

Mapvi-vii
Translator's Prefaceix
Introductionxvii
Iliad1
Major Characters493
Catalogue of Combat Deaths502
Index of Speeches506
Suggestions for Further Reading514

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Iliad of Homer (Lombardo translation) 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
VivMen More than 1 year ago
This translation of the Iliad is rather simpler than other translations, and is therefore easier to understand. It has a rather interesting beginning, with the priest calling death on the greek camp from Apollo for stealing his daughter.it gives a very thrilling account of the different battles that occur outside Troy's gates, especially the awesome final battle between Achilles and Hector. Also, the various other things that happen, such as Diomedes's rampage, are narrated very well, with Lombardo doing justice to the epic feel of the story. You get to know and love all the characters in the Greek army, such as Odysseus, Diomedes, Telamonian Ajak, O'ilean Ajax, and even Agamemnon. An interesting thing about the liad is the way it portrays death. For instance, whenever Diomedes kills a Trojan, which is quite often, Homer will go back briefly talk about the Trojan's life, and will normally end with saying, 'It is this soul now that Diomedes sends to Hades.' All in all, Lombardo's translation of the Iliad is a great read, and deserves to have a place in any permanent library.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is epic tale of both love and duty on the war socked plains of Troy. The rivelry inbetween Agomnon and Achillies within the story shows the true meening of humon nature with the gods and goddess of ancient Greece.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have read this book several times, so when I felt the call again I just happened to pick up this translation. I was happily surprised. I would gladly read anything else that he has translated. I like the earthy language, his use of the word 'b' when the goddeses are angry with each other. It fits. The introduction does not give too much away so that as the reader reads, the story unfolds anew. There is a list of the major characters at the end of the book so that if one gets mixed up with the names you just flip to the list and regain your bearing. This makes it user friendly. The story gives the reader a little insight into ancient Greek warfare and more, the struggles for power, the deference paid to heros and the sadness and its expression when facing death. It may have been written by a dead, bald, white man but in many ways it strikes me as anti-war, if the power of the females goddesess indicates anything it is their own power and authority as females. It speaks to modern times is what I am trying to say. Thank you.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Get the LOMBARDO translation. The poetry is just amazing. Here's the opening: Rage: Sing, Goddess, Achilles' rage/ black and murderous, that cost the Greeks/ Incalculable pain, pitched countless souls/ Of heroes into Hades' dark/ And left their bodies to rot as feasts/ For dogs and birds as Zeus' will was done. Does that capture the original? Who cares? The important thing is that it kicks a*s. If you want to enjoy the excitement of this classic, get this translation. If you want to impress people at cocktail parties, then you probably already know what to do. I've read lots of hyped up books that don't deliver. This one brings the pain. Achilles' psychopathology is so brilliantly rendered that I actually got sick reading about it. His critique of the 'heroic' society that he finds himself in is just stunning. I actually found myself questioning my own society because of it--i.e., here are the sacrifices and rewards that are expected; do they match up? Is it worth it? Besides all of that, this book also provides more massacres per capita than Terminator 2 and Aliens put together. Observe: Oileus at least had the chance to jump down/ And face Agamemnon, but as he charged/ The warlord's spear drove into his forehead/ Oileus' heavy bronze helm had little effect/ On the spears' sharp point, which penetrated/ Not only the helmt's rim but the skull's bone/ Scrambling the grey stuff inside. Top that James Cameron.