I'll Be Your Mirror

I'll Be Your Mirror

by Nan Goldin
     
 
Starting in the early 1970s, this comprehensive catalogue of Nan Goldin's midcareer retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art covers the party years in Boston and New York night clubs, the wide-spread drug abuse, and the burgeoning AIDS crisis. Goldin's powerful color photographs recount a highly personal version of the last two decades, chronicling her

Overview

Starting in the early 1970s, this comprehensive catalogue of Nan Goldin's midcareer retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art covers the party years in Boston and New York night clubs, the wide-spread drug abuse, and the burgeoning AIDS crisis. Goldin's powerful color photographs recount a highly personal version of the last two decades, chronicling her sometimes desperate combat against death and loss, her search for intimacy, and her embrace of new friendships in Europe and Asia.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
As this highly engrossing companion to a traveling mid-career retrospective suggests, photographer Goldin's influence has trickled in from the margins to the mainstream, from contemporary museum exhibitions to the latest Calvin Klein advertising campaign. Once a cult portraitist of drag queens, drug addicts and nightclub bohemians, Goldin has earned a broad audience and wide critical praise for a visually opulent, harshly intimate body of work. Arriving in New York in the early 1970s, Goldin began exhibiting The Ballad of Sexual Dependency, a constantly evolving, audio-visual slide show depicting the bacchanalian, at times nihilistic, demimonde of the Lower East Side and Times Square. Those heady days are chronicled here, as are their grim aftermath, evinced in Goldin's subsequent, lavishly colorful snapshots of friends afflicted with AIDS, of her own battering at the hands of a lover and of her recent recovery from drug addiction at McLean hospital in Belmont, Mass. An overview by curator Elizabeth Sussman, who places Goldin in an artistic context ranging from Larry Clark to Lucien Freud, is accompanied by personal commentary from an impressive cast of Goldin's friends, including camp movie actress Cookie Mueller and artist David Wojnarowicz (both of whom died of AIDS). Two other friends, Luc Sante and Darryl Pinckney, reminisce in separate essays about the edgy, outrageous and ultimately doomed Manhattan milieu commemorated in her early work. Other works include an interview with film critic J. Hoberman and a poem by James Fenton. This is not a scholarly analysis of Goldin's work but rather an emotionally charged look at her life and times and an extraordinary catalogue of her photographs unburdened by academic analysis. (Nov.)
Library Journal
Goldin's work, often described as intimate and passionate but sometimes seen too reductively as snapshots of her milieu, has always suffered from its direct simplicity. Acknowledged as the most influential photographer of her generation, she has been so often imitated in both advertising and art photography that it is easy to miss her still powerful edge. Even more than the current show at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, which this catalog accompanies, this volume reestablishes Goldin as the master of the personal documentary. In addition to the more than 300 images, mostly presented as full-page or two-page bleeds, the book collects diverse writings, from curator Elisabeth Sussman's straightforward biographical essay to interviews with Goldin and her roommate/best friend/collaborator David Armstrong to writings by Goldin's late friends David Wojnarowicz and Cookie Mueller that reflect and complement her direct style without actually discussing her work. The body of work-which was selected and edited by Goldin-is the heart of the book, though, and thankfully it still exhibits the old intensity without apology. Highly recommended for all libraries collecting American art and artists.-Eric Bryant, "Lirbary Journal"

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9783931141332
Publisher:
Scalo Verlag
Publication date:
03/28/2002
Pages:
460
Product dimensions:
8.31(w) x 10.92(h) x 1.51(d)

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