Ill Wind by Kevin J. Anderson, Doug Beason | | Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Ill Wind

Ill Wind

3.0 8
by Kevin J. Anderson, Doug Beason
     
 

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It is the largest oil spill in history: a supertanker crashes into the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco Bay. Desperate to avert environmental damage (as well as the PR disaster), the multinational oil company releases an untested designer oil-eating microbe to break up the spill.

What the company didn't realize is that their microbe propagates through the air

Overview

It is the largest oil spill in history: a supertanker crashes into the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco Bay. Desperate to avert environmental damage (as well as the PR disaster), the multinational oil company releases an untested designer oil-eating microbe to break up the spill.

What the company didn't realize is that their microbe propagates through the air ... and it mutates to consume anything made of petrocarbons: oil, gasoline, synthetic fabrics, plastics of all kinds. And when every piece of plastic begins to dissolve, it's too late....

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
A promising disaster scenario fizzles as Anderson and Beason (coauthors of Assemblers of Infinity and The Trinity Paradox) succumb to lightweight plotting, facile characterization and an apparent need to allude to as many pop-cultural artifacts as possible. When a panicky oil company tries to clean up a major spill in San Francisco Bay by dropping genetically engineered oil-eating microbes on it, the little organisms go berserk and start devouring most of the world's long-chain polycarbons (gasoline, plastics, etc.). Within the first 150 pages, this leads to a breakdown of communications and information-processing systems. From there until the end of the novel, however, affairs are basically limited to several displays of plucky ingenuity (during which one character compares the work of his group, unfavorably, to that of the Professor on Gilligan's Island). Meanwhile, an acting president and a general, independently, attempt to enforce martial law on an unwilling populace. The heroes are heroic, especially scientist Spencer Lockwood and pilots Billy Carron and Todd Severyn (the latter atoning for having unwittingly dropped the petrol-eating organism in the first place). Todd's girlfriend, Iris Shikozu, stages a post-apocalyptic rock concert at the Altamont Speedway. Almost all the chapter headings are titles of old pop songs, books or movies (Good Vibrations, The Stand, Urban Cowboy). It's possible that those who care, as Iris does, about Kansas's live comeback album will find this fascinating, but most readers are likely to feel that The End of the World As We Know It deserves better handling. (June)
Library Journal
Two best-selling authors team up to confront a biotechnological catastrophe.
From the Publisher

“Compulsively readable. The best disaster novel in many years. The problems of a United States falling apart at the seams as petroleum products vanish are shown at the national and local level, always through the effects on individuals. The basic idea is terribly plausible, the science spot-on, the politics totally persuasive. Ill Wind is a book you will read when you should be doing other things. Once you start, there is never a thought you might not continue to the last page.” —Charles Sheffield, senior scientist, Earth Satellite Corporation, and award-winning author of Cold as Ice, on Ill Wind

“A real winner. This book has potential to become a classic. Your grasp of the science, the technology, and the potential scene-and your ability to weave a truly engrossing fabric involving all of theme in authoritative fashion-are unique. My only worry is that you may have done to biotechnology what The China Syndrome did to nuclear energy-scared the hell out of the public.” —Dr. D. Alan Bromley, former assistant to the President for Science and Technology, on Ill Wind

Ill Wind is a believable and fast read. It goes George Stewart's classic Earth Abides one better, illustrating the perils of overreacting to environmental problems and misusing technology.” —Dr. Wilson K. Talley, president of the Hertz Foundation and former administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Ill Wind is compelling reading. A clever, believable, and adventurous epic.” —Neil Peart, drummer and lyricist for Rush

“I enjoyed Ill Wind thoroughly. Anderson and Beason have managed to take a plausible premise and turn it into a very entertaining (and also plausible) 'civilization in the aftermath' story.” —Walter S. Scott, president, Worldview Imaging Corporation

president of the Hertz Foundation and former admin Dr. Wilson K. Talley

Ill Wind is a believable and fast read. It goes George Stewart's classic Earth Abides one better, illustrating the perils of overreacting to environmental problems and misusing technology.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781614752912
Publisher:
WordFire Press
Publication date:
01/03/2015
Pages:
404
Sales rank:
1,198,294
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.90(d)

Meet the Author

Kevin J. Anderson is the author of more than one hundred books, 47 of which have appeared on national or international bestseller lists. He has over 21 million books in print in thirty languages. He has won or been nominated for numerous prestigious awards, including the Nebula Award, Bram Stoker Award, the SFX Reader's Choice Award, the American Physics Society's Forum Award, and New York Times Notable Book. By any measure, he is one of the most popular writers currently working in the science fiction genre.

Dr. J. Douglas Beason is the author of fourteen books, eight with collaborator Kevin J. Anderson, including Ignition and Ill Wind, as well as two non-fiction books.

A Nebula Award finalist, Doug's short fiction has appeared in numerous magazines and anthologies, and he has written for publications as diverse as Analog, Amazing Stories, Physical Review Letters and Physics of Fluids to Clashing Views on Controversial Issues in Science, Technology and Society. Doug and Kevin's novel The Trinity Paradox holds the distinction of being the first work of fiction ever nominated for the American Physical Society's Forum award for promoting the understanding of physics in society, and was the first novel ever reviewed in Physics Today.

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