I'm a Big Sister
  • I'm a Big Sister
  • I'm a Big Sister

I'm a Big Sister

4.2 31
by Joanna Cole, Rosalinda Kightley
     
 

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"Someone new is at our house," begins this loving, reassuring look at sisterhood from trusted author Joanna Cole. Told through the eyes of a new older sister, this simple story lays out all the good things about being an older sibling, and reminds new sisters that they are just as special as ever.

With an author's note about what big siblings need—extra

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Overview

"Someone new is at our house," begins this loving, reassuring look at sisterhood from trusted author Joanna Cole. Told through the eyes of a new older sister, this simple story lays out all the good things about being an older sibling, and reminds new sisters that they are just as special as ever.

With an author's note about what big siblings need—extra guidance, reassurance, love—and sweet, engaging artwork by Rosalinda Kightley, it's no wonder that over 1 million families have chosen I'm a Big Sister and I'm a Big Brother to prepare their young ones for their first big transition.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Phyllis Kennemer
A young girl describes her new role as "big sister" in this simple book based on the assertion that, "A caring family has plenty of love to go around!" The narrator explains that the new baby is too little to walk, to talk, or to play with toys. The baby is so little it cannot eat pizza or apples or ice cream. The baby likes to drink milk and sleep and, sometimes, look at big sister. Daddy explains that a baby's crying means it needs something—like a diaper change or a bottle—and he invites the sister to help. The parents share baby pictures of the older sibling reminding her that she was once little. They talk about things she can do now that she is big. She knows that her parents love her and she is uniquely herself. An ending "Note to Parents" provides advice about helping a child adapt to an added family member. The colorful full page illustrations depict a loving family group. Reviewer: Phyllis Kennemer, Ph.D.
Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
In a little book that has been developed to provide reassurance, the little girl talks about all of the things she can do and all of the thing the baby can't do (too little to walk, eat ice cream or pizza). She is then shown holding the baby, helping with the feeding, diaper changing, and looking at her baby pictures. The book concludes with the warm and important message that her parents love her, she is special to them and special because she is a big sister. The last page contains tip for parents to help an older sibling and parents adjust to a new family member. Also available is the companion book, I'm a Big Brother.
Children's Literature - Susie Wilde
Joanna Cole, one of the biggest names in children's nonfiction, has written two new books for young brothers or sisters, entitled appropriately I'm a Big Sister and I'm a Big Brother. Short pages of text show a proud young sibling who notes what the baby can and can't do (eat pizza or ice cream, play with toys) and then talks about they can do together (gently hold, sing little baby songs, make baby warm and cozy. The book explains the need for crying and shows how the older sibling still feels special to her parents. The book ends with a helpful note to parents who are transitioning into a larger family.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2The texts in these two books are identical, with the exception of the gender terms. Cole has successfully captured the youngsters' voices, making it easy for readers to identify with them, whether the books are being read aloud or alone. Familiar situations, as well as positive reinforcement of individuality and importance as part of the family, are good reasons to put this book into the hands of children who will soon be older siblings. A concluding "Note to Parents" in each book offers suggestions on how to communicate with older children about the changes that are coming. Like the texts, the engaging illustrations are the same in both books. Aside from the obvious difference of a boy in one and a girl in the other, the scenes are set up the samethe family at the park, looking at pictures, the father and older sibling giving the baby a bottle, etc. Unfortunately, the artist differentiates between a big brother and a big sister by showing the boy playing with trucks and building blocks, while the girl entertains dolls at a tea party. Sadly, due to these pictures, boys are unlikely to read about the big sister, which makes a case for a library to purchase both titles. Even if only one is feasible, it is certainly a solid addition to any collection.Dina Sherman, The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061900624
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
01/05/2010
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
48,785
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 7.10(h) x 0.30(d)
Age Range:
3 - 8 Years

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