I'm Gonna Like Me: Letting Off a Little Self-Esteem

( 15 )

Overview

Celebrate liking yourself! Through alternating points of view, a girl's and a boy's, Jamie Lee Curtis's triumphant text and Laura Cornell's lively artwork show kids that the key to feeling good is liking yourself because you are you. Like the duo's first New York Times best-seller, Today I Feel Silly and Other Moods That Make My Day, this is an inspired book to rejoice in and share. I'm Gonna Like Me will have kids letting off some self-esteem in no time!

A young ...

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Overview

Celebrate liking yourself! Through alternating points of view, a girl's and a boy's, Jamie Lee Curtis's triumphant text and Laura Cornell's lively artwork show kids that the key to feeling good is liking yourself because you are you. Like the duo's first New York Times best-seller, Today I Feel Silly and Other Moods That Make My Day, this is an inspired book to rejoice in and share. I'm Gonna Like Me will have kids letting off some self-esteem in no time!

A young girl learns to like herself every single day, no matter what.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
The bestselling team of Jamie Lee Curtis and Laura Cornell has returned, patting kids on the back in a super-spirited picture book that celebrates confidence.

With rhyming text that uses the memorable repeat phrase "I'm gonna like me when…," Curtis describes various experiences during which children ought to remember their self-esteem. It's especially important during hard times, such as when a student gives the wrong answer in front of the class or someone is picked last for the team. It's also important at good points in life, too, like "when I'm feeling strong. I'll walk with a smile, arms swinging, legs long." But of course, the best time for liking yourself is at home, knowing that a loving family is keeping you safe: "I'm gonna like me 'cause I'm loved and I know it, and liking myself is the best way to show it."

A jovial book reminding kids that despite life's highs and lows, there's no need to get down on yourself, I'm Gonna Like Me stands out as a feel-good triumph. Curtis's voice is sweetly childlike without getting mushy, and her charismatic lines roll off the tongue. Cornell's alternating girl-and-boy illustrations add just the right flair, giving the added humor and perspective that readers have come to love in all of her and Curtis's books. A book that's ideal for reading aloud or giving to someone in need of a little TLC, this surefire hit is reassuring reading. Matt Warner

Publishers Weekly
The dynamic duo behind Today I Feel Silly returns for another lively, emotionally reassuring picture book. This time out, Curtis looks to the source of what makes children (of all ages) feel comfortable in their own skin. Cornell pictures the perky rhymes being delivered by a pair of young protagonists confident enough to shake off embarrassment and to feel proud (though not overly so) of personal achievements. "I'm gonna like me when I'm called on to stand. I know all my letters like the back of my hand," announces a girl dressed in plaid, flowers and a cape. "I'm gonna like me when my answer is wrong, like thinking my ruler was ten inches long," says the boy as both youngsters stand before the school blackboard. Ultimately, the author concludes "I'm gonna like me 'cause I'm loved and I know it, and liking myself is the best way to show it." Though the message is both catchy and effective in its delivery, it's Cornell's humorous, detailed, ink-and-watercolor illustrations that give this volume true pizzazz. She hits just the right note of fear-tinged bravura with the characters' vividly imagined antics. Their portraits, embellished with all manner of costumes and fun accessories (a fire-extinguisher-like toothpaste tube, an Esther Williams lunchbox, a "Dalmatian Kit" for polka-dotting pets), will delight the audience. Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
School Library Journal
In rhyming text, a boy and a girl describe how they will like themselves whether things are going right or wrong. She says, "I'm gonna like me/when I'm called on to stand./I know all my letters/like the back of my hand." He says, "I'm gonna like me/when my answer is wrong,/like thinking my ruler/was ten inches long." They're going to like themselves, too, when they try new things, work on their good behavior, play with baby brother, or help around the house. They're going to like themselves "from [his] giant big toe to the braids on [her] head." Cornell's bright artwork appears to be done in watercolor and ink. The heavily detailed pictures have hidden humor that will be much more entertaining to adults than to children, such as the titles of the books scattered around the children's room. This pleasant addition will combine well with Nancy Carlson's I Like Me! (Viking, 1988) or Peggy Rathmann's Ruby the Copycat (Scholastic, 1991) for storytimes.-Roxanne Burg, Thousand Oaks Library, CA Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
When things go right, it's easy to feel good about oneself, but when things go the other way, sometimes it helps to have good self-esteem. From morning to night, the protagonists of this tale celebrate all there is to being individuals. "From my giant big toe to the braids on my head. I'm gonna like me . . . " Fashion statements, academic accomplishments, honesty, and even bravery in the face of octopus soup are all worthy of praise. A good self-image can also help when giving the incorrect answer in school or when chosen last on the playground. Summarizing the source of their positive outlook, the children claim the best way to show love is to love oneself. The final double-page spread invites readers to join in the fun by expressing their own self-esteem. The text walks a thin line between positive and saccharine, but even with some missteps, the overall message is a good one. Watercolor illustrations of the humorous children splash across each double-paged spread giving the sometimes predictable story some life. Characters' faces are wonderfully expressive and subtle details tucked into each painting will entertain watchful readers. Imaginative artwork keeps this from being forgettable.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060287610
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 9/17/2002
  • Edition description: Ages 4-8
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 66,700
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 11.32 (w) x 9.77 (h) x 0.33 (d)

Meet the Author

Jamie Lee Curtis has had many firsts: her first (and only) marriage to Christopher Guest, her first time holding her children, Annie and Tom, her first time pretending to be a customer in an episode of Quincy, and her first time she wrote words that became her first book. She lives in Los Angeles, the first city she ever lived in, and is always first in line, first to arrive, first to leave, and first to sleep.

Laura Cornell lives in New York City with her daughter, Lily (first and only), but they spend much time in California, Laura's first state in her first home. She was asked to illustrate Jamie's first book, and that became ten. Lucky is the first word that comes to mind.

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Interviews & Essays

A Conversation with Jamie Lee Curtis

Barnes & Noble.com: What inspired you to write I'm Gonna Like Me? And generally, how do you come up with ideas for your picture books?

Jamie Lee Curtis: All of my books, including I'm Gonna Like Me, are usually inspired by a situation that I find myself in, or something that I hear. My goddaughter, after receiving a present from me in New York City -- a kind of garish dress that I bought for her from California -- ran to the mirror in her room, held the dress up to herself, and looked in the mirror and said "I'm gonna like me!" When her mom told me that, "boom!" it popped into my head "what a great phrase," and that's really where the book began. It turned into much more of a book about self-esteem -- how you get it, how you lose it, and how to protect it -- from a child's point of view, obviously. But my goddaughter Boco's words were really the inspiration for this book, and the book is dedicated to her.

I come up with ideas for my books genuinely that way. They sort of pop into my head when I hear something. My last book, Where Do Balloons Go?, was born when I was at a children's birthday party where all the balloons had been accidentally let go, and a little girl looked at her mommy and said, "Where do balloons go?"

So my inspiration changes. My last couple of books have evolved from hearing things. Often, it's my children saying something, as it was with my next book, which is called It's Hard to Be Five and is about self-control. So, that's how the process works for me.

B&N.com: I'm Gonna Like Me teaches kids to have pride in who they are -- and to like themselves every day. Did you have a tough time liking yourself when you were growing up? How do you teach your own kids to feel good about themselves?

JLC: I actually did have a very tough time liking myself. It's hard to know why. I would say myriad reasons bring you to that place. But the way I try to work with my kids is very much the way the book talks about it, which is real action for praise. I'm not an overly praising mom. I'm trying to learn that my children need to feel good about what they did, more than me feeling good about what they did. And sometimes, I think parents get in the way of their children having the experience of possessing some self-pride. I think parents can actually encourage children into a place where they can develop self-pride...but then it needs to be the child developing that for him- or herself.

B&N.com: Have you always liked to write? How/why did you get started as a children's book author?

JLC: I like writing, but I never really knew I was going to write books. It was an accident. My daughter said something funny one day, and I wrote a book about it. I didn't really realize it was a book until the last bit of it, which was very emotional, and then I went "Oh -- this is a book," and from that my writing career was born. But it was never an old dream of mine that I had somehow put on the back burner; it was something that kind of developed organically.

B&N.com: In your books, you have such a great flair for presenting the world as seen through the eyes of a child. Your voice is so naturally childlike. How do you accomplish this?

JLC: I do like to write very, very much. I think I'm particularly immature, which is why the voice of my books is so childlike. I think I actually relate very, very well to young children...and sometimes not as well to adults.

B&N.com: I read an interview where you said, "Acting is a job for me. I try not to overestimate its importance. I just turn in my work every day and go home." Do you feel more connected to your role as an author? Is it any more important to you...or again, is it just a job?

JLC: Acting is a job. I think with the movie business, and acting in general, there's a lot of self-importance attached to it. I'm concerned about the fake reality the movie business relates and then the real reality of my life -- and how complicated it is to balance those two things, and to not think the fake reality is a lot better and a lot more fun. So I'm trying really hard to remember that it's just a job and that my life is my family and my friends, and that that's what is most important.

Writing is, as you called it before, a voice. It's something from me that actually has to do with my thoughts and my feelings and my point of view and my take on the world. Acting is actually making believe I'm someone else and kind of interpreting their thoughts. So for me, writing is something that isn't just a job. It has turned into something that is quite passionate and very organic. I try to let go of it and try not to control the process, and if a book pops out, great. And if it doesn't, I'll wait.

B&N.com: Were you a big reader when you were growing up?

JLC: I read while growing up, but I developed my love of reading more in my later teens and early adulthood. I did love to read. I do love to read. I read a lot. I try to alternate between nonfiction and fiction. And I sometimes delve into a subject I don't know anything about, like the Vietnam War, and then sort of delve into five or six texts and look at it from a bunch of different perspectives.

B&N.com: One of the wonderful things about your books is that your sense of humor as an adult translates well into humor for children. Your text is witty in a way that makes it fun for adults to read, as well as for kids. Is this intentional?

JLC: The whole "sense of humor/adult take on the world" translated through a children's book is really for me, the key to the reason my books are successful. I've known for a long time that children's books, particularly picture books, are to be read to a child by an adult and therefore that marriage -- that moment between the child and adult -- is quiet, and I think kind of profound, and therefore, the book needs to be able to satisfy both of those people. So a lot of the humor in my book is adult-aimed. Obviously some of the subtitles and a lot of the little extra writing that Laura Cornell, my partner, does is very much aimed at adults and at making them laugh, and then the main theme of the book and the main text writing, which is mine, is very childlike and aimed at the child. I think the hybrid of that is unique in children's literature, which is why I think it's done well, and why it makes my books special. It's something I'm most proud of with these books.

B&N.com: Your life is full of so many accomplishments -- you're an acclaimed TV and film actress, bestselling author, mother of two, etc. How do you juggle it all?

JLC: What I've learned about the juggling thing is you've got to let something drop. Something has to drop, or you have to be prepared to let it drop. And just as a juggler feels like a fool when he drops something in front of a lot of people, I think you have to recognize that you cannot keep it all in the air all of the time. That's a kind of an '80s and '90s phenomenon, and I hope the millennium will bring a new perspective, where women who are mothers can focus more and more on being a mother -- rather than trying to make mother a sort of part of their life. That sort of slash job -- mother/executive. I think being a mother demands a full focus as much as possible, and we need to reexamine that, without taking away all the wonderful accomplishments women have been able to achieve in the workplace. I think if you've chosen to be a mother, that should be the primary focus of your life...until those children are raised.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 15 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 15 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 12, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    great!

    I absolutely love ALL of these books! Each one is witty and entertaining, and my 3 year old daughter loves to read them every night. I would recommend this one as well as all the others for anyone who wants a little glimpse back into the reality of being a child.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2007

    A hit at our house!

    This has been my 3-year-old's favorite bedtime story since we bought it. It is a wonderful book that teaches our children self-esteem. I love reading it to them just as much as they love hearing/seeing it!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 1, 2004

    EXCELLENT!!!

    This book was excellent. My 5 year old is just starting kindergarten and needs to know to love herself. The illustrations are the best. Every time I read it we find another part of the picture that we didn't see. LOVE IT!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 23, 2007

    Superb!

    I'm hoping that some of the ideas in this book rub off on my child. Great book with lots of info!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2003

    A great book about children¿s self-esteem

    This is a fun book that teaches little kids self-esteem and by implication cautions parents when not to criticize their children. The book ends with a nice question that draws the child being read to into a good conversation about himself or herself. The illustrations are a riot. Gisela Gasper Fitzgerald, Author of ADOPTION: An Open, Semi-Open or Closed Practice?

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2003

    Very good reading

    So important to build self esteem in our children!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 23, 2002

    Based on "Tina, a Concerned Mother" comments ...

    I'm going out to buy a copy for all my nephews and nieces. If the Wacko Right- Wing-er's hate it ... IT MUST BE GOOD!!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 2002

    Me, myself and I

    Great book for parents to read to their children. It makes children see that they count too with great play on words for the Me, Myself and I connotations. It helps to build self esteem in every way and every day.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 9, 2002

    An upper!

    This book makes us all feel good! Happy, bouncy rhyme and funny illustrations!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2002

    So Impressed with Jamie

    This book is an eye opener in the sense's that it is new ideas and confirming. I have confidense that this book will in fact help persons commit on a daily bases and cannot be easily forgotten. Well written and correctly laid out as well. Good buy for anyone...anyone.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 25, 2002

    Good Intentions / Bad Results

    How could anyone possibly give this book a bad review? Well, in case you haven't looked around lately this country is busting at the seams with spoiled brats who already think too much of themselves. What's wrong with being hummble and dealing with simple hard lessons in life? If kids are inundated with attitudes that this book encourages their self esteem may improve but history and present day show just how bad things can get when people love themselves a bit too much. And are there any warnings about loving yourself too much in this book? Of course not. If we truly admit it to ourselves the hard times we experienced in our youth were great learning experiences and a little humility isn't half as bad as unchecked vanity.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 25, 2002

    makes a great gift!

    Love Jamie and all of her children's books. I recently bought this for my cousin's little boy for his birthday. Sure to be a hit. The illustrations are beautiful and kid friendly.. The meaning of the book is wonderful for any child. The rythmic meter of the book is great for younger children as well as older. Love it!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2002

    Excellent book to build Self-Esteem

    Be yourself and love yourself is the message here. All kids need to be reminded of this and to trust their heart.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 12, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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