I'm Me!

Overview


Little Imogen doesn't want to play princess or pirate! Why pretend? Being herself is the most fun of all! The story of a girl who knows who she is: "I'm Me!"

Grown-ups! Always telling kids what to do, how to act, and who to be! Imogen is excited to spend the day with her Auntie Sara, but which dress-up game does she want to play? Who is Imogen today? Is she a frilly princess in a poufy gown? A knight in shining armor, taming a flying dragon? An astronaut blasting off into ...

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Overview


Little Imogen doesn't want to play princess or pirate! Why pretend? Being herself is the most fun of all! The story of a girl who knows who she is: "I'm Me!"

Grown-ups! Always telling kids what to do, how to act, and who to be! Imogen is excited to spend the day with her Auntie Sara, but which dress-up game does she want to play? Who is Imogen today? Is she a frilly princess in a poufy gown? A knight in shining armor, taming a flying dragon? An astronaut blasting off into space? "No, no, no!" Imogen sings, with a shake of her pigtails. She doesn't want to be any of those things!
"Well," Auntie Sara asks, "if you're not a princess or a knight or an astronaut, who are you?"
"I'm me!" Imogen declares. And that's the best role of all.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Mary Hynes-Berry
The dust cover makes it clear that this is a book with a message; in fact it spells it out as it promises the story will deliver "the empowering message that the most fun of all is being yourself." Imogen is spending the day with Auntie Sara—who proposes all kinds of stereotypical imaginative play from poufy princesses, to swashbuckling pirates to zooming off into space as an astronaut. But Imogen says no to all these options. It turns out she just wants to go out to the park, pump high on the swings and then end up at home reading books about princesses and dragons. Chamberlain's brightly colored illustrations show all of the dramatic play scenarios in a somewhat cartoony style. Further effects are created by playing with font sizes and type. But that, like the book itself, seems a little predictable. Reviewer: Mary Hynes-Berry
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1—Imogen's visits to her aunt's house are always an adventure. As the child rushes in, Auntie Sara asks her what she wants to play. "Can we play pretend?" And the woman replies "Yes, yes, yes, we can!" A turn of each page reveals a suggestion: a naughty monkey, a princess and queen; a witch and her kitty; a pirate and parrot; knights, or astronauts with Auntie and Imogen gloriously decked out. But to each inquiry, Imogen smilingly replies "No! Today I want to be...." and she reveals she just wants to be herself. The duo dash off to enjoy the park, have an ice cream, and then settle in back home with stories and snuggling in the cozy conclusion. The exuberant, candy-colored illustrations show the pair delighting in each other as they cavort across the spreads. There are few books starring an aunt and her niece, and this playful gem that explores pretending and being oneself will find a welcome place in libraries.—Marge Loch-Wouters, La Crosse Public Library, WI
Kirkus Reviews
When Imogen arrives at her Aunt Sara's house for the day, she announces that she is ready to "play pretend." Aunt Sara runs wild with this idea, offering a series of suggestions, from a naughty monkey to a beautiful princess, a witch's cat to a pirate's parrot! Aunt Sara's ideas are depicted in almost psychedelic colors splashed across each page spread. Imogen occupies a narrow column in a contrasting color on the very edge of each right-hand page, from which she summarily rejects each suggestion. Children will no doubt enjoy this back and forth, from the zany suggestions of Aunt Sara to Imogen's rejection to an even more outlandish suggestion. The resolution to their dialogue, unfortunately, doesn't really work. In a confusing turn, Imogen finally announces what she wants to be—herself. She wants to go to the park, eat ice cream and then curl up with her Aunt Sara and enjoy some stories. This is a fine way to spend the day, no doubt, but in a story that seems intended to celebrate the imagination, it provides a most contradictory and unsatisfying conclusion. (Picture book. 3-6)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780545282222
  • Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
  • Publication date: 4/1/2011
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 994,968
  • Age range: 3 - 5 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.10 (w) x 11.20 (h) x 0.40 (d)

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