I'm My Own Dog

Overview

Caldecott Honor winner David Ezra Stein has fans at his command with this comical dog’s-eye view of having a best friend.

Many dogs have human owners. Not this dog. He fetches his own slippers, curls up at his own feet, and gives himself a good scratch. But there is one spot, in the middle of his back, that he just can’t reach. So one day, he lets a human scratch it. And the poor little fella follows him home. What can the dog do but get a leash to lead the guy around with? Dog ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$12.38
BN.com price
(Save 22%)$15.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (20) from $7.48   
  • New (17) from $7.48   
  • Used (3) from $9.23   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Caldecott Honor winner David Ezra Stein has fans at his command with this comical dog’s-eye view of having a best friend.

Many dogs have human owners. Not this dog. He fetches his own slippers, curls up at his own feet, and gives himself a good scratch. But there is one spot, in the middle of his back, that he just can’t reach. So one day, he lets a human scratch it. And the poor little fella follows him home. What can the dog do but get a leash to lead the guy around with? Dog lovers of all ages will revel in the humorous role-reversal as this dog teaches his human all the skills he needs to be a faithful companion.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
★ 05/12/2014
The cheery, two-fanged grin of Stein’s bulldog testifies to his supreme confidence: “Nobody owns me. I own myself.” In the first half of the book, Stein (Dinosaur Kisses) develops the idea of canine freedom as the bulldog relaxes alone on his rug, a well-chewed slipper beside him: “Sometimes, if I’m not comfortable, I tell myself to roll over. And I do.” But when the bulldog finds a human who’s willing to scratch the one place on his back he can’t reach, he finds himself strangely affected: “The little guy followed me home. I felt sorry for him.” Soon the bulldog and human come to an accommodation. “Between you and me,” the bulldog confides, “I’m his best friend.” As final, quiet proof of devotion, Stein draws the man with his arm around the bulldog, his tie loosened, his eyes closed contentedly, happy to wear the chewed-up slippers. Stein’s role reversal is deliciously fun, and what makes it sing is the bulldog’s confiding tone, and the way Stein telegraphs a range of emotions—exasperation, resignation, and pure joy—with a few bold lines. Ages 4–8. Agent: Rebecca Sherman, Writers House. (Aug.)
From the Publisher
A sweet and funny role reversal… An ode to the transformative joy of companionship.
—The New York Times Book Review

The typical pet picture book is turned on its ear in this witty and charming story. ... Young readers will get a kick out of the reversed human-pet roles, which are cheerfully and animatedly illustrated in pen and "hacked" kids’ marker and colored with watercolor and crayon. The cartoonlike drawings perfectly illuminate the life and attitudes of this canine character, from his contented chewing on a slipper to his joyful, bowlegged run during a game of fetch. Minimal text makes this a great read-aloud for listeners with short attention spans, while the humor will tickle older kids and grown-ups.
—School Library Journal (starred review)

Stein’s role reversal is deliciously fun, and what makes it sing is the bulldog’s confiding tone, and the way Stein telegraphs a range of emotions—exasperation, resignation, and pure joy—with a few bold lines.
—Publishers Weekly (starred review)

An independent dog teaches his human a few tricks in this amusing role reversal. ... Appealing pen, ink and watercolor illustrations, done in a primary pastel palette, convey the dog’s sassy, ultimately warm personality. The artist’s use of marker is reminiscent of a Chinese brush painting—where each stroke skillfully conveys an energy or intention about the character or setting. Fresh and lively, Stein infuses each spread with spontaneity. A charming person-as-pet story that will leave dog lovers chuckling.
—Kirkus Reviews

Dog lover or not, this delightful picture book by the author of Interrupting Chicken speaks to the most charming and beloved dog behaviors and will delight any reader. Beautiful watercolor illustrations enhance the charm of the text. Educators will snap up this title that supports teaching point of view.
—Library Media Connection

The popular viewpoint-reversal gag is particularly amusing here, with some excellent silliness in the dog’s solitary habits ("When I look in the mirror, I lick my own face because I am so happy to see me") and some genuine and funny legitimacy in the dog’s take on the situation. A fascinating illustrative note explains the artwork, including the fact that a marker was "hacked" to dispense India ink; the result is a particularly childlike iteration of Stein’s familiar vigor, with big scrawled lines colored with cheerfully slapdash washes in sunny and verdant outdoor hues. The round-headed, gray-spotted pup is aggressively cute, with a bit of bulldoggish fang showing at times, while the human he adopts is a wonderfully hapless grownup man with a stuck-in-the-’70s vibe. ... An enjoyable and deftly crafted joke.
—Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

"Who is the person in this relationship and who is the pet?" Stein makes amusing, adorable hay from this idea is this tale of an independent doggie who doesn’t need a person—well, not at first. ... Stein’s pen, marker, and watercolor figures are endearingly slapdash and exude warmth; when the dog says, "I’ve grown attached to the little fella," the duo’s affection for each other is palpable. A fitting celebration of opinionated pups everywhere.
—Booklist

Stein’s gestural watercolors are the perfect foil for the droll text. As the story unfolds, young readers will begin to understand the humorous tension between what the text says and what the pictures show (and what they know to be true about dogs and their owners). When the dog complains about having to "clean up after them," one can imagine a child laughing at the scene of spilled ice cream. Dog-loving parents will be reading this one over and over—and will never tire of it.
—The Horn Book

I'm My Own Dog, by David Ezra Stein gives readers a comical peek into the life of man's best friend. Our protagonist is a self-reliant canine who fetches his own slippers and can give himself scratches, thankyouverymuch. But when a lonely human follows him home, the dog has no choice but to fetch a leash to lead the man around with.
—Parents Magazine Tablet

A witty role-reversal tale... When he’s followed home by a wayward human, the precocious pet has to rethink his misgivings about people ("you always have to clean up after them") and discovers the joys of having a best bud.
—FamilyFun

Do kids (and adults) need another dog book? The answer, as any dog lover will tell you, is a resounding yes, especially when the book is created by the talented David Ezra Stein... I’m My Own Dog reminds us delightfully once again, dogs also make excellent best friends.
—BookPage Online

From Caldecott Honor winner, David Ezra Stein, young readers will enjoy seeing life through the point of view of the dog. ... The pen, marker and watercolor illustrations warmly represent the relationship that is building between the two lovable characters. ... This is a charming story that represents a point of view not often considered in the pet and owner/master relationship.
—Reading Today Online

Children's Literature - Sharon Salluzzo
A fiercely independent dog proudly proclaims, “I’m my own dog. Nobody owns me.” Told in the first person, this dog fetches his own sticks and slippers; but one day cannot satisfy an itch and so allows a human to scratch it. Because this is from the dog’s point of view, there are statements, such as “So I got a leash. How else am I supposed to lead him around?” The illustration shows the leash around the dog’s neck. The dog recounts other doggy activities (telling him to sit; and cleaning up after him). Through the cartoon-style illustrations, the reader is in on the joke of the reversal of roles and how these two became best friends. The mixed-media illustrations, with strong black outlines and watercolor/colored pencil painting, are wonderfully expressive and have a great sense of movement. Themes of strong-willed children and the development of friendship are cleverly handled with lightness and fun. This is a classic example of a good picture book where the combination of the text and the illustrations result in much more than either could express alone. You will want to read this over and over! Reviewer: Sharon Salluzzo; Ages 4 to 7.
School Library Journal
★ 10/01/2014
PreS-Gr 2—The typical pet picture book is turned on its ear in this witty and charming story. This independent pooch proudly takes care of himself: "I curl up at my own feet. Sometimes, if I'm not comfortable, I tell myself to roll over." He scoffs at the pets who follow commands and demonstrates how he throws and fetches his own stick, "it's fun." His life is pretty perfect…except for the itch on his back that he just can't reach. When a friendly person scratches the itch for him, then follows him home, the little canine can't help but adopt him. Young readers will get a kick out of the reversed human-pet roles, which are cheerfully and animatedly illustrated in pen and "hacked" kids' marker and colored with watercolor and crayon. The cartoonlike drawings perfectly illuminate the life and attitudes of this canine character, from his contented chewing on a slipper to his joyful, bowlegged run during a game of fetch. Minimal text makes this a great read-aloud for listeners with short attention spans, while the humor will tickle older kids and grown-ups.—Marian McLeod, Convent of the Sacred Heart, Greenwich, CT
Kirkus Reviews
2014-05-14
An independent dog teaches his human a few tricks in this amusing role reversal.Told from the dog's self-assured point of view, the story makes it clear this canine bows to no one. He likes his life of fetching slippers (his own), playing catch by himself and licking the reflection in the mirror. But when his back has an itch that can't be reached and he lets a human scratch it, life changes. The human follows him home, and what can the pooch do but adopt him? Despite the hard work of training and cleaning up after a human, the canine secretly admits it's all worth it, as the two become best friends. Appealing pen, ink and watercolor illustrations, done in a primary pastel palette, convey the dog's sassy, ultimately warm personality. The artist's use of marker is reminiscent of a Chinese brush painting—where each stroke skillfully conveys an energy or intention about the character or setting. Fresh and lively, Stein infuses each spread with spontaneity.A charming person-as-pet story that will leave dog lovers chuckling. (Picture book. 2-4)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780763661397
  • Publisher: Candlewick Press
  • Publication date: 8/5/2014
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 55,325
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.90 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 0.30 (d)

Meet the Author

David Ezra Stein is the creator of many award-winning picture books, including Interrupting Chicken, which was awarded a Caldecott Honor, Because Amelia Smiled, and Dinosaur Kisses. He lives with his family in Kew Gardens, New York.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)