I'm No Saint: A Nasty Little Memoir of Love and Leaving [NOOK Book]

Overview

From Sex and the City (Warner, 1997) to The Sexual Life of Catherine M. (Grove, 2002), literary tales of modern women's sexual escapades have never been more popular. Titillating details about the sexual lives of some of the nation's most eligible bachelors and the author's connections in the world of print journalism guarantee vast coverage in major newspapers and women's magazines. The vicarious pleasure at witnessing such bad behavior has never been so much fun. The author is a freelance journalist whose ...
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I'm No Saint: A Nasty Little Memoir of Love and Leaving

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Overview

From Sex and the City (Warner, 1997) to The Sexual Life of Catherine M. (Grove, 2002), literary tales of modern women's sexual escapades have never been more popular. Titillating details about the sexual lives of some of the nation's most eligible bachelors and the author's connections in the world of print journalism guarantee vast coverage in major newspapers and women's magazines. The vicarious pleasure at witnessing such bad behavior has never been so much fun. The author is a freelance journalist whose pieces regularly appear in the New York Times, Vogue, and Harper's Bazaar.
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
With ruthless honesty, Hayt documents the sudden puncture of her marriage; her almost innumerable flirtations, seductions, and extramarital affairs; her cocaine-fueled nightlife; and her bouts with cosmetic surgery and motherhood. Apparently, Hayt survived all these challenges without sacrificing her writing ability. I'm No Saint is a titillating, tantalizing, ultimately cautionary tale.
Publishers Weekly
What keeps the reader's interest from page one of this fiery memoir is not the explicit sex scenes or the family drama, but an admiration for Hayt's sheer chutzpah in jumping into life headfirst. Now in her mid-40s, the author, who writes for the New York Times, among other publications, considers no detail sacred as she recounts her failed marriage (she was 35 when she and her husband separated; 43 when they finalized the divorce), and her numerous subsequent sex partners, cosmetic surgery and trials as a mother and emerging writer and art critic. While it may be hard for some to respect a person whose activities are fueled not only by desire but also by drugs, Hayt's honesty about her struggles as a woman who married early without a chance to discover her own path in life will resonate with many. As Hayt hits bottom with an addiction to cocaine, a love lost and a master's thesis due, she wonders if "anyone else was as sick of listening to me as I was." Luckily for readers, Hayt decided to pursue her dream of writing with a passion she once directed toward her love of excess. This memoir will speak to women who have taken on society's role as "wife, mother, and teacher" only to feel as though they were "passive concessions to someone else's expectations." Agent, Daniel Greenberg. (Oct. 18) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
If this breezy account of one woman's sexual escapades were a film, it would definitely be rated NC-17. Hayt, a fashion writer for the New York Times, goes public about her private parts, not to mention those of her various premarital, marital and extramarital partners. She begins with her wedding, declaring that "it felt like the start of a long prison sentence," then flashes back to her days as a promiscuous teenager. Predictably, marriage to the unadventurous Charlie foundered within a few years, and Hayt's search for adulterous sexual fulfillment began. At 32, she got pregnant by another man and had an abortion; by the time she was 34, she and Charlie had separated. Still supported by her estranged husband, newly renovated by Botox injections, dermabrasion, plastic surgery and breast implants, she launched herself at a series of men: the art dealer who left his shoes on during sex and had cold, green reptilian eyes; the media mogul with an aversion to bathing; the billionaire politico who was a lousy kisser; the right-wing oil magnate who wore lizard-skin footwear. Guessing their identities should give readers some amusement. In addition to blind dates and chance encounters, Hayt tried finding men through personal ads in the New York Observer, at her synagogue and in the men's department at Bergdorf Goodman; the results were frequently disastrous and, as told here, extremely funny. Her excruciatingly detailed play-by-plays of her sexual antics are not so amusing, and it comes as no surprise that her husband, on the verge of a reconciliation as the narrative nears its end, changed his mind after reading her tell-all manuscript. A nasty little memoir of sex and self-indulgence, forthose eager for some upscale titillation.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780759569393
  • Publisher: Grand Central Publishing
  • Publication date: 10/26/2006
  • Sold by: Hachette Digital, Inc.
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 313 KB

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2006

    Good read but......

    I found Elizabeth's novel very, very good. It is a good read, easy and flows nicely. What I didn't like is the fact that she blames everyone else (Charlie, her mother, her upbringing, the cocaine) for the fact that she is promiscuous, plain and simple. I don't get how any woman can just give excuse after excuse - face it Elizabeth you were a littly slu**y and that's it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2006

    candide from long island

    Ms hayt's memoir has become controversial because of her graphic depiction of some of her sexual experiences and because of the kiss and tell aspect regarding some of her dates. but it is a disservice to this book to dismiss it as purely a fluffy kiss and tell or even to dismiss it as another whining baby boomer screed. coming from an affluent long island background, hayt explores her disillusionment with what she had been led to expectfrom life, both good (marriage/motherhood) and bad (sex for approval). along the way she encounters experiences shared with many outside of trendy new york: she discusses how her abortion haunts her years later we learn how she was fired and hustles to rejoin the workforce and make her way. we might even characterize this memoir as a sort of candide from long island. there is more depth here than one might think. her writing is competent and conversational. it is never artificial or cutesy.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 21, 2005

    I wouldn't want to marry her but I'd seat her on a jury

    Elizabeth Hayt is a complicated person and this is a complicated memoir. There is a lot more here than the salacious kiss-and- tell (plus some professional payback) that drives its publicity. After reading it, we must ask ourselves, who is Elizabeth Hayt, really, and who does she want us to think she is? The answers to these two questions are not necessarily identical. On her way from suburban housewife to freelance journalist/art critic/single mom, she accumulates significant life experience. She gets fired. She has to hustle for a job. She wrestles with her motherhood issues. She succumbs to, battles, and ultimately overcomes cocaine addiction. She develops maternal feelings and bonds with her son. She has an abortion. A potentially controversial note is that the abortion-- and the potentiality of what might have been-- haunts her for years afterwards. Although she might have shared with us how this affected her views on the subject, the message conveyed to readers is that abortion is not a cost-free choice. And of course there is the sex and her relationships. If we accept that the sex was graphically described for a non sales generating reason (and some of the scenes do have a tabloid yuck factor: do we REALLY need to know in one of them that an exchanged body fluid was 'nicotine-tinged' as it leaked out of her?), it has to be that these incidents were landmarks in that particular relationship. A pattern emerges, however, in that soon after each torrid orgasm, she explains how the relationship deterioriated and ultimately failed. Although she questions whether having sex with someone before a relationship gets going is an effective strategy for building a long term relationship, she does not seem to infer any new operating assumptions about human behavior from her consistently unsuccessful approach. She writes well and her prose is accessible. Her comparison of new mothers to Lee's army after Appomattox is arresting and evocative. On the other hand, she sometimes overwrites and gives us too much information. Her writing is not as elegant as Virginia Woolf, but neither is it as angry as Andrea Dworkin. Overall she is a good storyteller. Where does Ms. Hayt end up at the end? I suspect she would like us to see her as striding into the future with happiness and autonomy and self actualization her companions, the results of this self examination. I don't completely buy this. While she does candidly examine herself in terms of an objective data gathering, I am not sure she performs an equally rigorous analysis of what she sees and who she is. She has not confronted those aspects of her personality that lead her to dead end relationships, which seems to be a recurring theme. Those traits will continue to cause her to make bad relationship choices, but will let her accumulate more life experience for the sequel. But you can't ignore the rich life experience she has accumulated and reports. And although we can see how she is not, perhaps, made for marriage, she is nevertheless someone I would seat on a jury to sit in judgment over my client. Her story is well worth the time to read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2005

    200+ Pages of Whining

    OK...the sex scenes are pretty good. But you can get that in Penthouse Letters. The rest of it is an exercise in watching a woman destroy her life...her self respect and then blame it on 'my father's lack of attention'. It makes a person glad that the husband finally told her to do what she had already been doing for years...'go ____ yourself.'

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