Images Of Civil War Medicine: A Photographic History

Images Of Civil War Medicine: A Photographic History

by Gordon Damman, Alfred Jay Bollet
     
 

With this beautifully illustrated photographic history, the acclaimed author of Civil War Medicine: Challenges and Triumphs has taken his expertise one step further and illuminated this history in images.

Images of Civil War Medicine: A Photographic History is an extensive collection of never-before-published photographs taken during the

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Overview

With this beautifully illustrated photographic history, the acclaimed author of Civil War Medicine: Challenges and Triumphs has taken his expertise one step further and illuminated this history in images.

Images of Civil War Medicine: A Photographic History is an extensive collection of never-before-published photographs taken during the Civil War. It provides a visual encyclopedia of medical facilities, individual surgeons, and other medically related phenomena, accompanied by a text describing the main features of Civil War medicine.

Although there are many books containing photographs of the Civil War, this is the first to cover medical treatment facilities in this era. A perfect gift for Civil War buffs, historians, and medical history enthusiasts, the text of this beautiful picture book also gives a complete overview of the medical experiences of the Civil War. The books extensive collection of individual Civil War surgeons displaying their uniforms and equipment will be of especial interest to Civil War reenactors, and its depiction of existing pre-war structures converted to hospitals will fascinate those interested in contemporary architecture. A major strength of the book is its large number of Cartes de Visites, or photographs of individual surgeons, which descendants of Civil War participants often collect.

Images of Civil War Medicine: A Photographic History covers all the main features of Civil War Medicine, including:

  • Confederate aspects of Civil War medicine
  • Contemporary prominent medical educators
  • Civil War hospitals and hospital stewards
  • Field hospitals
  • Surgery, dentistry, and embalming Nursing

With hundreds of previously unpublished photographs, Images of Civil War Medicine: A Photographic History is an essential addition to any enthusiasts collection.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Philip W. Leon, PhD (The Citadel)
Description: The authors combined their collections of Civil War photographs and drawings having a medical aspect and collaborated in producing a readable, informative book that will interest medical professionals, Civil War buffs, and students of Americana in general. The subjects of the images are surgeons, nurses, designs of field and general hospitals, and, inevitably, grisly photographs of young soldiers maimed in combat.
Purpose: The book seeks to wed photography with medicine. Photography had advanced from early heliographs, daguerreotypes, ambrotypes, and tintypes just in time for the internecine struggle that helped define America. The authors intend to show that photography was a forerunner of today's indispensable medical imaging techniques. Their book identifies all the subjects and offers interesting anecdotes about the surgeons and the conditions under which they worked.
Audience: The book will appeal to Civil War scholars and to students of medical history. While most Civil War scholars probably know about weaponry, tactics, uniforms, communications, and the like, they might not know about the frequency of amputations, occurrences of diseases and their effect on the fighting force, and the use of anesthetics (which were surprisingly abundant and available). The authors, a dentist and a physician, speak to their fellow practitioners and do not hesitate to use precise medical terms that a layman might not know.
Features: Because this book is primarily a presentation of visual images, a pleasing aspect of the book is the remarkable quality of the photographs. Almost 150 years old, they are, as one might expect, sometimes rough around the edges and the lighting is crude by today's studio standards for the many cartes de visite, but the images are clear and interesting. Anecdotes add to the book's appeal. For instance, Civil War soldiers needed all four front incisors in order to tear open paper cartridges to load their rifles. At enlistment stations, examining physicians would mark "4F" on the records of men lacking those front teeth; hence the term 4F came to denote those unfit for duty for any medical reason. The one serious objection to the book is that it is self-restricting: almost all of the images are from the Union side because this is what the authors collected. The section dealing with Confederate surgeons consists of only 13 pictures on nine pages, and those pictures were borrowed from Dr. Jonathan O'Neal. For this reason, the book cannot be called comprehensive.
Assessment: The authors have made a valuable contribution to the field of Civil War medicine; a companion volume with similar images from the Confederate side would be welcome. This attractive book deserves a place in all medical school libraries and in the private book collections of military historians.
Reviewer: Philip W. Leon, PhD(The Citadel)
Description: The authors combined their collections of Civil War photographs and drawings having a medical aspect and collaborated in producing a readable, informative book that will interest medical professionals, Civil War buffs, and students of Americana in general. The subjects of the images are surgeons, nurses, designs of field and general hospitals, and, inevitably, grisly photographs of young soldiers maimed in combat.
Purpose: The book seeks to wed photography with medicine. Photography had advanced from early heliographs, daguerreotypes, ambrotypes, and tintypes just in time for the internecine struggle that helped define America. The authors intend to show that photography was a forerunner of today's indispensable medical imaging techniques. Their book identifies all the subjects and offers interesting anecdotes about the surgeons and the conditions under which they worked.
Audience: The book will appeal to Civil War scholars and to students of medical history. While most Civil War scholars probably know about weaponry, tactics, uniforms, communications, and the like, they might not know about the frequency of amputations, occurrences of diseases and their effect on the fighting force, and the use of anesthetics (which were surprisingly abundant and available). The authors, a dentist and a physician, speak to their fellow practitioners and do not hesitate to use precise medical terms that a layman might not know.
Features: Because this book is primarily a presentation of visual images, a pleasing aspect of the book is the remarkable quality of the photographs. Almost 150 years old, they are, as one might expect, sometimes rough around the edges and the lighting is crude by today's studio standards for the many cartes de visite, but the images are clear and interesting. Anecdotes add to the book's appeal. For instance, Civil War soldiers needed all four front incisors in order to tear open paper cartridges to load their rifles. At enlistment stations, examining physicians would mark "4F" on the records of men lacking those front teeth; hence the term 4F came to denote those unfit for duty for any medical reason. The one serious objection to the book is that it is self-restricting: almost all of the images are from the Union side because this is what the authors collected. The section dealing with Confederate surgeons consists of only 13 pictures on nine pages, and those pictures were borrowed from Dr. Jonathan O'Neal. For this reason, the book cannot be called comprehensive.
Assessment: The authors have made a valuable contribution to the field of Civil War medicine; a companion volume with similar images from the Confederate side would be welcome. This attractive book deserves a place in all medical school libraries and in the private book collections of military historians.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781932603392
Publisher:
Demos Medical Publishing, LLC
Publication date:
10/23/2007
Pages:
204
Sales rank:
1,084,322
Product dimensions:
(w) x (h) x 0.50(d)

Meet the Author

Dr Gordon Damman is the founder of the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in Frederick, MD. He is a member of many historical societies and Civil War associations, and has written and lectured extensively on the subject. He is the author of Volumes I, II and III of the Pictorial Encyclopedia of Civil War Medical Instruments and Equipment. He is also on the editorial board of North/South Magazine.

Dr. Alfred Jay Bollet has had a long and distinguished medical career, with a focus in internal medicine and rheumatology. He has served on the faculty of several medical schools, was chairman of the departments of medicine at the Medical College of Georgia and the State University of New York in Brooklyn, and has been Clinical Professor of Medicine at Yale University School of Medicine for many years.

Author of the critically acclaimed, award-winning Plagues & The Impact of Human History on Epidemic Disease, Dr. Bollet's previous book on civil war medicine was published in 2002 and has been referred to as the most accurate and extensive treatment of the subject to date; by the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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