Images of the Modern Vampire: The Hip and the Atavistic [NOOK Book]

Overview

In the predecessor to this book, The Universal Vampire: Origins and Evolution of a Legend, Brodman and Doan presented discussions of the development of the vampire in the West from the early Norse draugr figure to the medieval European revenant and ultimately to Dracula, who first appears as a vampire in Anglo-Irish Bram Stoker’s novel, Dracula, published in 1897. The essays in that collection also looked at the non-Western vampire in Native American and Mesoamerican traditions, Asian and Russian vampires in ...
See more details below
Images of the Modern Vampire: The Hip and the Atavistic

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$55.49
BN.com price
(Save 30%)$79.99 List Price

Overview

In the predecessor to this book, The Universal Vampire: Origins and Evolution of a Legend, Brodman and Doan presented discussions of the development of the vampire in the West from the early Norse draugr figure to the medieval European revenant and ultimately to Dracula, who first appears as a vampire in Anglo-Irish Bram Stoker’s novel, Dracula, published in 1897. The essays in that collection also looked at the non-Western vampire in Native American and Mesoamerican traditions, Asian and Russian vampires in popular culture, and the vampire in contemporary novels, film and television. The essays in this collection continue that multi-cultural and multigeneric discussion by tracing the development of the post-modern vampire, in films ranging from Shadow of a Doubt to Blade, The Wisdom of Crocodiles and Interview with the Vampire; the male and female vampires in the Twilight films, Sookie Stackhouse novels and True Blood television series; the vampire in African American women’s fiction, Anne Rice’s novels and in the post-apocalyptic I Am Legend; vampires in Japanese anime; and finally, to bring the volumes full circle, the presentation of a new Irish Dracula play, adapted from the novel and set in 1888.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

CHOICE
As John Dryden might have said, had he lived in an alternate universe, 'Here is Satan's plenty.' Brodman and Doan have assembled a collection of 16 essays by diverse hands as a companion to their edited volume The Universal Vampire: Origins and Evolution of a Legend (2012). That first volume focuses on vampires up through Stoker's Dracula, and this new collection offers an eclectic variety of essays focused on modern incarnations of the vampire in print and film, organized in three sections: 'The Vampire in Modern Film,' 'Race, Gender and the Vampire,' and 'New Readings of the Vampire.' Not surprisingly, the collection contains no fewer than five essays devoted to the Twilight series (and several more that refer to it). Reading through the essays is rather like attending a conference on vampires, literature, and film. . . .Perhaps the most significant contributions are Zélie Asava's and Marie-Luise Loeffler's brief essays on the depiction of black vampires. Also notable is the editors' dramatic reimagining of Dracula set in Ireland. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates and above; general readers.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781611475838
  • Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press
  • Publication date: 10/4/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 262
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Barbara Brodman is professor of humanities at Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. She holds master's and doctoral degrees in Hispanic languages and literature, Latin American studies, and international business and has published a variety of scholarly works that deal with international arts and affairs.

James E. Doan is professor of humanities at Nova Southeastern University, where he teaches courses in literature, the arts, folklore and mythology, including a course on the vampire which he has taught for some twenty years.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Barbara Brodman and James E. Doan
Introduction

The Vampire in Modern Film

Victoria Williams
1 - Reflecting Dracula: The Un-dead in Alfred Hitchcock’s Shadow of a Doubt
Murray Leeder
2 - “A Species of One”: The Atavistic Vampire from Dracula to The Wisdom of Crocodiles
Melissa Olson
3 - Dracula the Anti-Christ: New Resurrection of an Immortal Prejudice
Simon Bacon
4 - Eat Me! The Morality of Hunger in Vampiric Cuisine

Race, Gender and the Vampire

Donna Mitchell
5 - The Madonna and Child: Re-Evaluating Social Conventions through Anne Rice’s Forgotten Females
Karin Hirmer
6 - Female Empowerment: Buffy and Her Heiresses in Control
Cheyenne Mathews
7 - Lightening “The White Man’s Burden”: Evolution of the Vampire from the Victorian Racialism of Dracula to the New World Order of I Am Legend
Zélie Asava
8 - “You’re Nothing to Me But Another... [White] Vampire”: A Study of the Representation of the Black Vampire in American Mainstream Cinema
Marie-Luise Loeffler
9 - “She Would Be No Man’s Property Ever Again”: Vampirism, Slavery, and Black Female Heroism in Contemporary African American Women’s Fiction

New Readings of the Vampire

Alaina Steiner
10 - Blood-Abstinent Vampires & the Women Who Consume Them
Ben Murnane
11 - “Exactly My Brand of Heroin”: Contexts and the Creation of the Twilight Phenomenon
Hope Jennings and Christine Wilson
12 - Disciplinary Lessons: Myth, Female Desire, and the Monstrous Maternal in Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight Series
Sarah Heaton
13 - Vampire Vogue and Female Fashion: Dressing Skin and Dressing-up in the Sookie Stackhouse and Twilight Series
Batia Stolar
14 - The Politics of Reproduction in Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight Saga
Burcu Genç
15 - The Vampire from an Evolutionary Perspective in Japanese Animation: Blood+
James E. Doan and Barbara Brodman
16 - Adapting Dracula to an Irish Context: Reconfiguring the Universal Vampire

About the Contributors
Index
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)