Images, Representations and Heritage: Moving beyond Modern Approaches to Archaeology / Edition 1

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Overview

This volume begins a discourse on the implications of performing archaeology in a world dominated by modern trends of mass production, mass replication and representation of cultural forms, and mass consumption of images of the past. The contributors explore the extent to which contemporary consumption of mass-produced replicas, simulations, images and experiences of the past cause a crisis of representation of the past. Eschewing romantic beliefs, it discusses what archaeology can do.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

From the reviews:

'This collection of essays takes our understanding of the public role of archaeology forward, by placing themes of representation, tourism and the heritage industry into the contexts of contemporary debates on the character of modern society. Where public archaeology is often blandly portrayed as a matter of the management of a cultural resource, Russell's volume presents the traces of the past as active in the present, recruited in the formation of multiple identities, circulated in media and the arts, and formative of dreams and fantasies. This is a book that will be of interest to anyone concerned with the place of the past in today's world, not simply archaeologists and heritage professionals.'
Professor Julian Thomas, School of Arts, Histories and Cultures, University of Manchester

"Reaching for some new ways to approach archaeology, editor Russell brings together 12 contributions scholars based in Europe and the US who come from diverse disciplines including art, archaeology, architecture, history, visual culture, classics, and regional planning.... The subject index affords access to the specifics of this wide-ranging exploration." (Reference and Research Book News, November 2006)

"One of the intriguing elements of this book is the opportunity at the end of each section for authors to respond to their articles and the articles of others. This gives a congruency to chapters where seemingly different topics of museum design, Irish passage tombs, and bog bodies can be seen as connected under some broad intellectual thread of understanding. Russell did well as the editor of this volume acting as both a guide and a narrator connecting dots and helping explain themes, allowing chapter authors to do what they do best, tell us about their topics. In this book you will find no mention of flaked stone, Egyptian mummies, or Meso-American temples, though Stonehenge is mentioned. If you are looking for a good book from a distinctly post-modern approach on the future of archaeology, you should look no further." (Historical Archaeology)

"The editor, Ian Russell, has obviously performed a considerable feat in creating a forum for debate and marshalling these articles and commentaries. He also provides a very thorough Introduction and Conclusion tying the volume together. … this is an important book, not only for those interested in public archaeology and heritage, but for anyone involved in the production of images on the past." (Siân Jones, Journal of Anthropological Research, Vol. 64, 2008)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780387322155
  • Publisher: Springer US
  • Publication date: 6/21/2006
  • Edition description: 2006
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 390
  • Product dimensions: 9.21 (w) x 6.14 (h) x 0.94 (d)

Table of Contents

Foreword.- Introduction: Images of the Past: Archaeologies, Modernities, Crises and Poetics.- Part One: Archaeologically Imagined Communities.- Introduction.- Archaeological Tourism: A Signpost to National Identity.- Irish Images on English Goods in the American Market: The Materialization of a Modern Irish Heritage.- Representing Spirit: Heathenry, New-Indigenes and the Imaged Past.- Responses.- Part Two: Archaeologies and Opportunities.- Introduction.- The Role of Archaeology in Presenting the Past to the Public.- Assessing the Role of Digital Technologies for the Development of Cultural Resources as Socoeconomic Assets.- Experiencing Archaeology in the Dream Society.- Responses.- Part 3: The 'Crisis of Representation' of the Past.- Introduction.- Towards Archaeologies of Memories of the Past and Planning Futures: Engaging the Faustian Bargain of 'Crises of Interpretation'.- Collective Memory and the Museum: Towards a Reconciliation of Philosophy, History and Memory in Daniel Libeskind's Jewish Museum.- The Simulacra and Simulations of Irish Neolithic Passage Tombs.- Responses.- Part 4: Poetic Archaeologies and Movements Beyond Modernity.- Introduction.- Practice Makes Perfect: A Discussion of the Place of the Brochure Image in Landscape Tourism.- Bog Bodies and Bog Lands: Trophies of Science, Art and the Imagination.- Who Wants to Visit a Cultural Heritage Site? A Walk Through an Archaeological Site with a Visual and Bodily Experience.- Responses.- Concluding Remarks.

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