Imagine Harry
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Imagine Harry

5.0 1
by Kate Klise, M. Sarah Klise
     
 

Meet Harry. He is the best friend a little rabbit could have. But no one else can see Harry, so Little Rabbit is extra careful to look out for him. He makes sure Harry gets plenty of cookies, no brussels sprouts, and absolutely no baths. Then Little Rabbit starts school, and he discovers that friendships change. Luckily, the best sorts of friends

Overview


Meet Harry. He is the best friend a little rabbit could have. But no one else can see Harry, so Little Rabbit is extra careful to look out for him. He makes sure Harry gets plenty of cookies, no brussels sprouts, and absolutely no baths. Then Little Rabbit starts school, and he discovers that friendships change. Luckily, the best sorts of friends always know just when they're needed.

Sisters Kate and Sarah Klise have created a profoundly sweet, emotionally true story about growing up, starting school, and the beauty of having a best friend (imaginary or not).

Editorial Reviews

Booklist

* “In words and art, this strikes just the right chord." (starred)
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz
Many youngsters have imaginary friends. Little Rabbit's best friend, Harry, keeps him company by playing through the year, in winter snow and through summer swims, while the other animals refer to him as "Imagine Harry." Little Rabbit's mother has to humor him by bringing an extra glass of lemonade for Harry, and being careful not to sit on him. When it's time for Little Rabbit to start school, his mother says that Harry can keep him company as long as he sits quietly. Harry behaves well as Little Rabbit becomes more involved with his classmates. Gradually, Harry seems to disappear. "Harry moved away," Little Rabbit tells his mother. He is happy with new friends, but glad to have his good memories. The characters are anthropomorphic in this story, although only the rabbits occasionally wear appropriate clothes within suitably detailed settings at home and in school. Acrylic paints depict all the low-key action with mixed hues. Neither text nor visuals explain the absence of Little Rabbit's father. The story is reassuring for families with imaginary visitors, as well as being amusing for all.
School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 1
Little Rabbit and his imaginary best friend do everything together until the youngster starts school. While Harry's status is never explicitly stated, he is represented by a blank space, and the bunny's friends call him "Imagine Harry." The text strikes a balance between humor and understanding without patronizing Little Rabbit. His mother is good-natured about her son's request for two lemonades and four cookies so that he can share with his companion, but her patience begins to wears thin after he says he cannot go to bed, wash his hair, or eat Brussels sprouts because of Harry. As Little Rabbit adjusts to school and his life begins to fill up with new friends and activities, Harry fades away until one day he is startled to realize that he has not seen his imaginary playmate in weeks. The acrylic illustrations reflect the gradual change, as the empty spaces become less prominent and eventually disappear. Warm tones of apricot, blue, and brown infuse the pictures, reinforcing the themes of acceptance and love. Detailed settings emphasize the importance of home and school in the rabbit's life, such as multiple family photos hanging on the walls. The family is composed of himself and his mother, a fact that is never mentioned but will be appreciated by single parents looking for books that reflect their own lives. Make room on the shelf for this warm, funny story.
—Suzanne Myers HaroldCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Kirkus Reviews
Little Rabbit has an imaginary best friend named Harry, but what will Harry do when Little Rabbit goes to school? Little Rabbit loves playing with Harry in winter snow, rolling down the hill with Harry in the spring grass and climbing trees with Harry in the summer. A very sympathetic and understanding Mother Rabbit patiently supplies Harry with his own lemonade and cookies, lets Little Rabbit stay up past his bedtime to keep Harry company and even tolerates it when Little Rabbit refuses to eat his Brussels sprouts. But she warns Little Rabbit that when he starts school in the fall, Harry won't be able to have his own desk and will have to be quiet. When school starts, Harry is so quiet that as Little Rabbit makes new friends and becomes involved in school activities, Harry gradually disappears. And that's okay. Humorous acrylic illustrations chronicle Little Rabbit's escapades with and without his imaginary playmate as he makes the transition from life with Harry to life with real friends in this amiable homage to the invisible playmate. (Picture book. 3-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780152057046
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
06/01/2007
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.00(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.36(d)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Kate Klise is the author of many punny and funny middle grade novels, including all of the books in the popular 43 Old Cemetery Road series. She has also written a number of picture books and young adult novels. Ms. Klise lives in Norwood, Missouri. For more information about Kate, visit www.kateandsarahklise.com.

M. Sarah Klise illustrates picture books and middle grade novels with a graphic twist. She also teaches art to children and adults in the Bay Area in California. For more information about Sarah, visit www.kateandsarahklise.com.

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Imagine Harry 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
smg5775 More than 1 year ago
Cute story of a little girl who has an imaginary friend. I enjoyed it. I especially liked that no one tried to impose their reality on hers to make her get rid of her imaginary friend. Adorable drawings in the book.