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Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism
     

Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism

4.2 5
by Benedict Anderson
 

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Anderson's seminal work shows how the European processes of inventing nationalism were transported to the Third World through colonialism and adapted by subject races in Latin America and Asia.

Overview

Anderson's seminal work shows how the European processes of inventing nationalism were transported to the Third World through colonialism and adapted by subject races in Latin America and Asia.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“One of the greatest … deserves still to be central to our thinking about the world.”
—T. J. Clark, London Review of Books

“Anderson’s work stands as an inspiration not only to his students, his readers, and all those whose lives have been affected by his work, but also to all those who reject the false choice between politics and scholar¬ship, and who seek to live accordingly.”
Nation

“Anderson transformed the study of nationalism … and was renowned not only for his theoretical contributions but also for his detailed examinations of language and power in Indonesia, Thailand and the Philippines.”
New York Times

“Far and away the most influential study of nationalism … As well-versed in novels and poetry as he was in scholarship, Anderson was an eloquent advocate for global culture.”
—Jeet Heer, New Republic

“Everything Anderson wrote was boldly original … He was never content to tell an audience what they wanted to hear.”
—Anthony Reid, Guardian

“This is a book to be owned and read, re-read, and treasured.”
Academic Library Book Review

“Anderson’s knowledge of a vast range of relevant historical literature is most impressive; his presentation of the gist of it is both masterly and lucid.”
—Edmund Leach, New Statesman

“Everything Anderson wrote was boldly original … He was never content to tell an audience what they wanted to hear.”
—Anthony Reid, Guardian

“A brilliant little book.”
—Neal Ascherson, Observer

“Sparkling, readable, densely packed.”
—Peter Worsley, Guardian

Peter Worsley - Guardian
“Sparkling, readable, densely packed.”
Neal Ascherson - Observer
“A brilliant little book.”
Edmund Leach - New Statesman
“Anderson’s knowledge of a vast range of relevant historical literature is most impressive; his presentation of the gist of it is both masterly and lucid.”
Nation
“A brilliant exegesis on nationalism.”
Guardian
Sparkling, readable, densely packed.”— Peter Worsley
Observer
A brilliant little book.”— Neal Ascherson
New Statesman
Anderson’s knowledge of a vast range of relevant historical literature is most impressive; his presentation of the gist of it is both masterly and lucid.”— Edmund Leach
Academic Library Book Review
“This is a book to be owned and read, re-read, and treasured.”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781784786755
Publisher:
Verso Books
Publication date:
09/13/2016
Pages:
240
Sales rank:
720,632
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.20(h) x 0.80(d)

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher
"Sparkling, readable, densely packed." —-Peter Worsley, Guardian

Meet the Author

Benedict Anderson was Aaron L. Binenkorp Professor of International Studies Emeritus at Cornell University. He was Editor of the journal Indonesia and author of numerous books including A Life Beyond Boundaries, Java in a Time of Revolution, The Spectre of Comparisons: Nationalism, Southeast Asia, and the World and The Age of Globalization: Anarchists and the Anticolonial Imagination.

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Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The author of the book, Imagined Communities, Benedict Anderson, Professor of International Studies at Cornell University, promotes a process that people of different cultures go through in order to reach a point where they feel a kinship with people that they have not even met. When there is this togetherness, a people can be considered a nation. This kinship does not make a nation real though. There is not a short answer for why a nation is an imagined community. The professor described nationalism as an anomaly. The point that nationalism has philosophical poverty, or lack of a stable base in order to rise as a mindset demotes it to a substance without merit, to imagination. The professor goes on to describe that a nation is imagined because the people who feel a camaraderie will not know even most of the people in their group. It is required that in order to belong to a group in reality, one has to know all the members of their group. Failure of this causes the togetherness to be imagined only. This thought describes that nationhood was borne out of necessity and not reality because independent thought brought by Enlightened thinkers, that being royal was not proof that God would speak and lead the people, showed that people were somehow equal and subsequent Revolution and overthrow left a power vacuum. Now more than any other during the age of technology and instant communication nationwide, nations are imaginary on a grander scale. The process of nationhood is too long to describe on one page since it includes religion, the decline of kingships, capitalism and books, and languages being used in government. It was shown that this process rises from necessity and not legitimacy. This is a good book to describe this concept.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Magma45 More than 1 year ago
An excellent book with plenty of insights into society.