Immediate Family

Immediate Family

3.3 3
by Sally Mann
     
 

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Terror, self-discovery, doubt, vulnerability, pain, and joy all clash and converge in Mann's powerful photographs. Sally Mann's widely acclaimed Immediate Family, which explores childhood with unparalleled emotional depth, is now available in paperback for the first time.

Overview

Terror, self-discovery, doubt, vulnerability, pain, and joy all clash and converge in Mann's powerful photographs. Sally Mann's widely acclaimed Immediate Family, which explores childhood with unparalleled emotional depth, is now available in paperback for the first time.

Editorial Reviews

Gretchen Garner
Mann's "At Twelve" (Aperture, 1988) depicted girls at the threshold of sexual maturity. Her interest in sexualized childhood continues in these photographs of her own three youngsters. Often she shows them naked, perhaps not always willingly (one picture is "The Last Time Emmett Modeled Nude"), and sometimes in poses that might make not just feminists but nearly anyone shudder: e.g., "Hayhook," in which daughter Jessie hangs naked from a lethal-looking hook like so much dead meat. A shot of her son called "Popsicle Drips" crops his torso a la Edward Weston's famous picture of his son Neil but emphasizes the boy's penis, surrounded by said drips. The focus upon sex competes with the evocation of death in shots of bleeding children and dead animals and of sleeping postures that recall nineteenth-century postmortem portraits. The pictures do share a luscious, romantic quality, and Mann has become a curators' favorite despite (or because of) her clear references to many other photographers, especially Emmett Gowin. In an accompanying essay, Reynolds Price opines of Mann's children that he "can't well imagine that they'll regret any moment their mother has seen or arranged." Some viewers, though, may suspect they'll not only regret but resent their mother's employing them for such provocative, disturbing images.
Booknews
Mann's work is quite controversial in circles where nudity and innocence do not overlap. She offers 65 black-and-white photographs of her children doing children's things in and around their rural Virginia home. An exhibition of the collection began a US tour in October 1992. Includes an afterword by writer Reynolds Price. No scholarly paraphernalia. 11.25" deep. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
vogue.com - Rebecca Bengal
the book that catapulted her career into the realm of critically lauded and publicly debated celebrity
The Boston Globe - Sebastian Smee
They were simply among the most beautiful photographs I had ever seen.
American Photo - Krystal Grow
influential monograph...
elle.com - Lisa Shea
...the formal power and lapidary beauty of the work...
American Suburb X - The Editors
Sally Mann chooses to explore the concept of childhood and “growing up” using a variety of the sensual, reality and the fantastic; all through a maternal eye.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780714828251
Publisher:
Phaidon Press
Publication date:
01/01/1994
Pages:
78
Product dimensions:
11.02(w) x 9.45(h) x (d)
Age Range:
13 Years

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Immediate Family 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Though the photos are often appealing and many have great composition and clarity, many are just plain weird, such as a girl with her hair caught in a bush, popsicle stains on a torso, or a child who has wet the bed. Mann defends this in the text by referring to a Japanese philosophy of depicting reality even when beauty is tinged with ugliness, but I'm not convinced. Also, too many of the photos don't have a professional appearance but instead look like family snapshots that are too distant or even blurred. Artistically I don't see what Mann is trying to say in the photos, other than just being a mother documenting her children growing up; there is little underlying philosophy or direction. In fact, when her children had grown, she had no more models, and turned to far less interesting subject matter. Still, I like the book. The description of her upbringing and her father's eccentric sculptures was great. Young nudes are always attractive and a bit different than the run-of-the-mill 18+ nudes in America. Forget the political propaganda terminology about 'pornography' and 'weirdos;' if more Americans could mentally separate nudity from sex they might then be able enjoy books like this instead of wasting their time with picket signs in front of Barnes & Noble stores.
nolanmama More than 1 year ago
This is not art - is very inappropriate.