Immoralist

Immoralist

4.3 9
by Andre Gide
     
 

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Superb novel by modern French master deals with the consequences of amoral hedonism. It is the story of Michel, who tries to rise above good and evil and give free rein to his passions. In so doing, he neglects his wife, with tragic consequences. Introductory Note. Map. Footnotes.
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Overview

Superb novel by modern French master deals with the consequences of amoral hedonism. It is the story of Michel, who tries to rise above good and evil and give free rein to his passions. In so doing, he neglects his wife, with tragic consequences. Introductory Note. Map. Footnotes.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780679741916
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
02/28/1996
Series:
Vintage International Series
Edition description:
First Vintage International Edition
Pages:
192
Sales rank:
384,982
Product dimensions:
5.10(w) x 7.99(h) x 0.49(d)

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Immoralist 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
carlosmock More than 1 year ago
The Immoralist by André Gide Translated to English by Richard Howard This is the story of Michel, an French archaeologist and philologist who to satisfy his dying father's wishes marries Marceline, a peasant. Michel clearly does not love Marceline and has an repressed attraction to young boys. As they impart into their honeymoon to the Sahara, he gets sick with tuberculosis, forcing Marceline to nurse him to health. In his convalescence, he stops his inhibitions towards young boys. "This was more than a convalescence - this was an increase, a recrudescence of life, the afflux of a richer, hotter blood which would rough my thoughts one by one, penetrating, stirring, coloring the most remote, delicate and secret fibers of my being." Michel's brush with death awakens his passion for the sensual and forbidden. "I looked at myself a long time, without any more shame, with joy." Feeling guilty and ungrateful, Michel finally consummates his marriage. Marceline becomes pregnant so they return to Paris. Michel is bored with Parisian life, and after Marceline miscarriages, they embark on another trip to the Sahara. This time, it's Marceline who succumbs to tuberculosis and it's Michel's turn to take care of her. Unfortunately, Michel is too deep into his fascination of boys and Marceline dies. The book opens with a letter to a government official from his brother, one of Michel's friends. Apparently he's gone down somewhere in the Sahara (Sidi b. M.) to fetch him. As the letter finishes, we get the story told from Michel's first person point of view. Published in 1902 and it was scandalous. Gide in many instances hides the name of people, government officials and locales to avoid scandal. Funny how things have changed. Other than a three way between Michel, Moktir - an Arab boy, and his girlfriend, there is no same sex narrated in the book. If there is anything immoral about Michel it is his languorous, sometimes complacent style that has focused all of his energy of a man to be happy - no matter the consequences. I read all of its 171 pages in a few hours. A Classic!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is one of the best books I've read in a while. Gide does an amazing job revealing his own inner struggles through his character development of Michael. I wanted to be appalled by his behavior, but rather than distain, I found myself relating to his actions and thoughts...a testimate to Gide's ability as a story-teller. This book is short, easy to read, and well worth the time.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Just picture a young James Dean playing the role of the Arab boy Bachir and it will give this book a new, wonderful touch.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Gide's protagonist will explore the nature of morality. You'll question him at first ... you'll end up questioning your own conventions. Not for the timid!