Immortality: Four Sermons Preached Before The University Of Cambridge (1869)

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LECTURE II. THE HOPE OF THE GENTILE. 2 Timothy I. 10. ... Who hath abolished Death, and brought Life and Immortality to light tlvrow/h the Gospel. In my last Lecture I glanced at some of those philosophical systems which, having ...
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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
LECTURE II. THE HOPE OF THE GENTILE. 2 Timothy I. 10. ... Who hath abolished Death, and brought Life and Immortality to light tlvrow/h the Gospel. In my last Lecture I glanced at some of those philosophical systems which, having their origin later than Christianity, profess to deal with the problem of a Future Life. I purpose in this Lecture briefly to pass in review some of the doctrines of heathen religions, and some of the speculations of heathen philosophers on the Life to come. In the religious system, we may recognize the voice of man's heart and conscience; in the philosophical speculation, we shall trace the effort to give certainty to the instincts of nature by the aid of reason and experience. We shall observe— however it may be accounted for—that there is for the most part a growth and development of belief. The primary, elemental belief, that death is not the endLECT. ii.] Growth of a belief in a Future Life. 35 of man, may be said to be as wide as the human race. Even in such systems as those of Buddha and Confucius, which have sometimes been held either formally to deny, or at any rate to pass by in silence a life beyond the grave, there may be found traces of such a belief, and whatsoever the sage may have held, or the philosopher have thought, there can be no doubt as to the popular persuasion. The worship of ancestors in China, the infinite series of transmigrations through which the Buddhist must pass, before he can hope to attain Nirvana, are witnesses to that indestructible instinct of the human heart, which refuses to admit the annihilation of so divine a thing as man. But this universal, ineradicable belief has assumed a variety of different forms. Its first and simplest expression has been in the respect shown for the dead, in the interment...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781165419395
  • Publisher: Kessinger Publishing Company
  • Publication date: 9/10/2010
  • Pages: 170
  • Product dimensions: 9.00 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 0.36 (d)

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LECTURE II. THE HOPE OF THE GENTILE. 2 Timothy I. 10. ... Who hath abolished Death, and brought Life and Immortality to light tlvrow/h the Gospel. In my last Lecture I glanced at some of those philosophical systems which, having their origin later than Christianity, profess to deal with the problem of a Future Life. I purpose in this Lecture briefly to pass in review some of the doctrines of heathen religions, and some of the speculations of heathen philosophers on the Life to come. In the religious system, we may recognize the voice of man's heart and conscience; in the philosophical speculation, we shall trace the effort to give certainty to the instincts of nature by the aid of reason and experience. We shall observe however it may be accounted forthat there is for the most part a growth and development of belief. The primary, elemental belief, that death is not the endLECT. ii.] Growth of a belief in a Future Life. 35 of man, may be said to be as wide as the human race. Even in such systems as those of Buddha and Confucius, which have sometimes been held either formally to deny, or at any rate to pass by in silence a life beyond the grave, there may be found traces of such a belief, and whatsoever the sage may have held, or the philosopher have thought, there can be no doubt as to the popular persuasion. The worship of ancestors in China, the infinite series of transmigrations through which the Buddhist must pass, before he can hope to attain Nirvana, are witnesses to that indestructible instinct of the human heart, which refuses to admit the annihilation of so divine a thing as man. But this universal, ineradicable belief has assumed a variety of different forms. Its first andsimplest expression has been in the respect shown for the dead, in the interment...
Read More Show Less

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