Impact!: The Threat of Comets and Asteroids

Impact!: The Threat of Comets and Asteroids

by Gerrit L. Verschuur
     
 

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Noted radio astronomer and author Gerrit L. Verschuur paints an unsettling portrait of the possibility of collisions between the earth and comets and asteroids in space. Verschuur explores potential threats to our planet and describes what scientists are doing to prepare for the frightening possibility. 40 photos. 3 line drawings. 256 pp.

Overview

Noted radio astronomer and author Gerrit L. Verschuur paints an unsettling portrait of the possibility of collisions between the earth and comets and asteroids in space. Verschuur explores potential threats to our planet and describes what scientists are doing to prepare for the frightening possibility. 40 photos. 3 line drawings. 256 pp.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Not since Spengler has the end of civilization been threatened so often. Astronomer Verschuur may well be right to be so alarmist. In recent centuries, humans tended to see the probability of being hit by a substantial meteoroid as being so slight as to be negligible. But then we discovered that the moon's craters did not originate in extinct volcanoes but in impacts. At the beginning of this decade, it became widely accepted that the dinosaurs were wiped out as a result of impact, more precisely an impact that created Chicxulub Crater off the coast of the Yucatan. Groups like Spacewatch have been discovering new NEOs (Near-Earth Objects) at an impressive rate. Finally, in 1994, after some much-publicized dud comets, the many fragments of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 slammed into Jupiter causing, among other things, a 10,000-kelvin fireball that flew outward at 38,000 mph. Recently, estimates of the size of the impactor (or impactors) that could destroy much of the world has been reduced as it has become clearer that the real damage would not be so much to the land as to the atmosphere. Verschuur would have been better off letting these facts speak for themselves. Instead, he spends much of the book talking about the history of uniformitarianism vs. catastrophism without giving lay readers enough help with the underlying differences between the two. And his excitable prose sometimes undermines the power of the fact ("`Wow!' I responded profoundly to illustrate how stunned I was.") Verschuur's tone is that of a prophet in the desert, warning of doom with a sometimes disturbing single-minded determination: "On the morning of June 30, 1908, civilization may have suffered the worst piece of luck in its history," he says describing the meteoroid that flattened miles in a remote area of Siberia. "Had the Tunguska object struck a large city, a million people or more might have perished, and the phenomenon would have raised everyone's awareness to the threat of comet impact." (Sept.)
Library Journal
Earth may not need a plan to counter an alien invasion, but its inhabitants would be wise to determine the extent of a more likely threat from outer space: the untold numbers of comets and asteroids hurling around the solar system, some of which are bound to hit home sooner or later. So warns astronomer and science writer Verschuur (Hidden Attraction, Oxford Univ., 1993), who insists on the need for a thorough census of large objects with earth-crossing orbits. Beginning with the reputed dinosaur-killing asteroids and ending with the Jupiter comet hits of 1994, Verschuur traces the geographical and historical evidence suggesting the role of such collisions in the earth's formation, the evolution of life, and even in the course of human civilization. He laments that our species has been slow to accept the reality of the situation despite having evolved to the point where we might actually be able to defend ourselves against future impacts. This interesting and accessible if somewhat repetitive book is recommended for public and academic libraries. [We are being bombarded not only by comets but also by books about them; see Duncan Steel's Rogue Asteroids and Doomsday Comets, LJ 5/1/95; John Lewis's Rain of Iron and Ice, LJ 1/96; and John and Mary Gribbin's Fire on Earth, LJ 6/1/96.Ed.]Patrick Dunn, East Tennessee State Univ. Lib., Johnson City
Booknews
Radio astronomer Vershuur tells scary stories about 10,000 tons of space debris falling to Earth every year, the meteorite (or whatever it was) that was responsible for the extinction of the dinosaurs, our near miss with an asteroid in 1989, the comet falling on Jupiter in 1994, and what would happen to us if another big one fell. He also explains NASA's plans to detect and deflect dangerous celestial objects. Moderately illustrated in black and white. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
Kirkus Reviews
Verschuur, an astronomer (Hidden Attraction, 1993), offers a detailed and alarming account of the meteors and comets that have struck the Earth in the past, with devastating consequences, and reminds us that such disasters are likely to reoccur.

He begins his account in 1980 with the discovery of an anomalous concentration of the element iridium at the geological boundary between the Cretaceous and Tertiary eras—the point at which the dinosaurs became extinct. Rare on Earth, iridium is far more common in comets and meteors; this discovery led to the theory that a massive comet striking the earth with the impact of 20 million hydrogen bombs led to the death of the dinosaurs. At first reluctant to accept the concept, many geologists were eventually brought around by the discovery of a massive impact crater near Yucatán. Verschuur then examines both the geological and astronomical evidence for frequent large impacts: the presence of other craters on Earth (145 had been identified by 1995), the prevalence of craters on other bodies of the solar system, the large number of astronomical bodies in near-Earth orbits, historical accounts of comet or meteor impacts. Verschuur places great emphasis on the possibility of a large, devastating strike in the near future. He also gives particular attention to the consequences of an ocean impact (in fact, the most likely scenario), with huge tsunamis crashing hundreds of miles inland. And he considers courses of action we might take, emphasizing a program to detect (and possibly deflect) the menaces from space. Verschuur argues that we should seriously entertain the prospect of moving some of Earth's population off the planet, to allow the human race to survive an unpreventable large strike.

Occasionally overblown, often jumpy in its organization, this is nonetheless a strong treatment of one of the key scientific discoveries of our time.

From the Publisher
"Verschuur is a fine writer with an engrossing writing style."—New Scientist

"A strong treatment of one of the key scientific discoveries of our time."—Kirkus Reviews

"Interesting and accessible."—Library Journal

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780198026174
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Publication date:
01/01/1997
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
6 MB

Meet the Author

Gerrit L. Verschuur is a noted radio astronomer and author of many articles and books popularizing astronomy. He lives in Lakeland, Tennessee.

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