Imperial Nature: Joseph Hooker and the Practices of Victorian Science

Imperial Nature: Joseph Hooker and the Practices of Victorian Science

by Jim Endersby
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0226207919

ISBN-13: 9780226207919

Pub. Date: 05/15/2008

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

Joseph Dalton Hooker (1817–1911) was an internationally renowned botanist, a close friend and early supporter of Charles Darwin, and one of the first—and most successful—British men of science to become a full-time professional. He was also, Jim Endersby argues, the perfect embodiment of Victorian science. A vivid picture of the complex

Overview

Joseph Dalton Hooker (1817–1911) was an internationally renowned botanist, a close friend and early supporter of Charles Darwin, and one of the first—and most successful—British men of science to become a full-time professional. He was also, Jim Endersby argues, the perfect embodiment of Victorian science. A vivid picture of the complex interrelationships of scientific work and scientific ideas, Imperial Nature gracefully uses one individual’s career to illustrate the changing world of science in the Victorian era. By focusing on science’s material practices and one of its foremost practitioners, Endersby ably links concerns about empire, professionalism, and philosophical practices to the forging of a nineteenth-century scientific identity.

            “A refreshing record of how scientists worked. . . . The practice of science provides the context necessary for understanding how theories advanced; without this background, scientific progress looks too simple, and leaps seem extraordinary.”—Nature
            “Imperial Nature adds significantly to our understanding of the multifaceted and far from inevitable ascendancy of the professional scientist in Victorian culture.”—Isis 

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780226207919
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
Publication date:
05/15/2008
Pages:
448
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.30(d)

Table of Contents

     List of Illustrations
     Acknowledgements

     Introduction

1.  Traveling

2.  Collecting

3.  Corresponding

4.  Seeing

5.  Classifying

6.  Settling

7.  Publishing

8.  Charting

9.  Associating

10. Governing

     Conclusion

     Notes
     Bibliography
     Index

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