Implementing the Four Levels: A Practical Guide for Effective Evaluation of Training Programs

Implementing the Four Levels: A Practical Guide for Effective Evaluation of Training Programs

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by Donald L. Kirkpatrick, James D. Kirkpatrick
     
 

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In this indispensable companion to the classic book Evaluating Training Programs: The Four Levels, Donald and James Kirkpatrick draw on their decades of collective experience to offer practical guidance for putting any or all of the Four Levels into practice. In addition, they offer a comprehensive list of the ten requirements for an effective training program and

Overview

In this indispensable companion to the classic book Evaluating Training Programs: The Four Levels, Donald and James Kirkpatrick draw on their decades of collective experience to offer practical guidance for putting any or all of the Four Levels into practice. In addition, they offer a comprehensive list of the ten requirements for an effective training program and show how to decide what to evaluate, how to get managers to support the evaluation process, and how to use the Four Levels to construct a compelling chain of evidence demonstrating the contribution of training to the bottom line.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781576755327
Publisher:
Berrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
10/01/2007
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
153
Sales rank:
611,277
File size:
3 MB

What People are saying about this

Christopher R. Hardy
"Without Kirkpatrick's Four Levels, we would all be flying blind! This new book is another very important addition to our evaluation body of knowledge and will provide very practical solutions to your evaluation problems."--(Christopher R. Hardy, PhD., Director, Strategic Planning and Customer Relationship Management, Defense Acquisition University)
Barbara Hewitt
"Don and Jim's insights on management buy-in tactics and many practical examples of how to execute comprehensive level three and four evaluations are truly invaluable. As no industry dynamics are exactly the same, I found the flexibility of options/tools/resources around learning evaluations to be credible and comprehensive."--(Barbara Hewitt, Executive Director, MGM Grand University)
Allison A. S. Wimms
"Unless training directly addresses an organization's need, and unless the training professional can prove this with evidence, the value of the program (or the entire training department) may be missed. What better authors to address this than Don and Jim Kirkpatrick!"--(Allison A. S. Wimms, Senior Training and Development Specialist, Johns Hopkins HealthCare LLC)

Meet the Author

Donald L. Kirkpatrick is Professor Emeritus of the University of Wisconsin and is the author of six books. He is a past president of ASTD and is the recipient of its highest honor, the Lifetime Achievement in Workplace Learning and Performance Award. He is also a member of Training Magazine’s Hall of Fame.
James D. Kirkpatrick, PhD, is SMR-USA’s Vice President of Global Training and Consulting. He is the coauthor, with Donald L. Kirkpatrick, of the third edition of Evaluating Training Programs: The Four Levels and Transferring Learning to Behavior.

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Implementing the Four Levels: A Practical Guide for Effective Evaluation of Training Programs 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This practical guide, a companion to Donald Kirkpatrick¿s Evaluating Training Programs: The Four Levels, provides a framework for putting his system into practice. The book assumes a prior knowledge of the four-level system, but demonstrates how to determine which programs to evaluate and at which level to pitch the evaluation, and how to gather the right evidence and present it in a compelling format. The authors provide many examples of every form they discuss in the book and emphasize the importance of following each level in sequence. The style of writing is rather repetitive and could have been better edited, but the advice is sound. We recommend this guide to all those involved in learning and development, such as trainers, training designers and managers.