The Importance of Being Earnest / Edition 1

The Importance of Being Earnest / Edition 1

4.2 51
by Oscar Wilde, Samuel Lyndon Gladden
     
 

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ISBN-10: 1551116944

ISBN-13: 9781551116945

Pub. Date: 11/13/2009

Publisher: Broadview Press

About the Author

Oscar Wilde was born in Dublin in 1854. He graduated from Oxford University in 1878 with a reputation as a brilliant scholar and quickly dazzled London society with his wit and his flamboyant dress. His first literary successes came in the 1880s with his lecture tour of America and the publication of his fairy tales. These were followed

Overview

About the Author

Oscar Wilde was born in Dublin in 1854. He graduated from Oxford University in 1878 with a reputation as a brilliant scholar and quickly dazzled London society with his wit and his flamboyant dress. His first literary successes came in the 1880s with his lecture tour of America and the publication of his fairy tales. These were followed by five highly polished plays and The Picture of Dorian Gray, all completed during the first half of the 1890s. After losing a slander suit over accusations of his homosexual behavior, Wilde was prosecuted and spent two years in prison. Following his release in 1897, estranged from his wife and children, Wilde moved to Paris, where he died in 1900.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781551116945
Publisher:
Broadview Press
Publication date:
11/13/2009
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
224
Sales rank:
1,010,820
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.50(d)

Related Subjects

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
Introduction
Oscar Wilde: A Brief Chronology
A Note on the Text

The Importance of Being Earnest:
A Trivial Comedy for Serious People

Appendix A: Playbills for The Importance of Being Earnest (1895)

  1. The First, Uncensored Playbill
  2. The Second, Censored Playbill

Appendix B: Reactions and Reviews

  1. From The Daily Graphic (15 February 1895)
  2. From William Archer, The World (20 February 1895)
  3. From The Observer (17 February 1895)
  4. From The Times (15 February 1895)
  5. From Bernard Shaw, Saturday Review (1895)
  6. From Max Beerbohm, Around Theatres (1902)

Appendix C: Ada Leverson’s “The Advisability of Not Being Brought Up in a Handbag” (1895)

  1. Ada Leverson, “The Advisability of Not Being Brought Up in a Handbag,” Punch; or,The London Charivari (2 March 1895)
  2. Telegram from Oscar Wilde to Ada Leverson (15 February 1895)

Appendix D: Three Works by Gilbert and Sullivan

  1. From W.S. Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan, Patience; or, Bunthorne’s Bride (1881)
  2. From W.S. Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan, The Gondoliers; or, The King of Barataria (1889)
  3. From W.S. Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan, HMS Pinafore; or, The Lass That Loved a Sailor (1878)

Appendix E: From J.G.F. Nicholson, Love in Earnest (1892)

Appendix F: Conduct Manuals

  1. From Mrs. Humphrey, Manners for Men (1897)
  2. From Julia McNair Wright, Practical Life; or,Ways and Means for Developing Character and Resources (1881)

Appendix G: On Dandyism and on Wilde as a Dandy

  1. From Charles Kendrick, Ye Soul Agonies in Ye Life of Oscar Wilde (1882)
  2. George Frederick Keller, “The Modern Messiah,” Wasp (31 March 1882)
  3. Linley Sambourne, “O.W. [Punch’s Fancy Portraits 37],” Punch; or,The London Charivari (25 June 1881)
  4. From Lloyd Lewis and Henry Justin Smith, “No Wave of His Chiseled Hand” (1936)
  5. “Aestheticism as Oscar Understands It” (1882)
  6. “Mr. Wild [sic] of Borneo” (1882)
  7. W.H. Beard, “The Aesthetic Monkey” (1882)

Appendix H: Other Works by Wilde

  1. From “A Few Maxims for the Instruction of the Over-Educated” (1894)
  2. From “Phrases and Philosophies for the Use of the Young” (1894)
  3. From “Preface,” The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891)
  4. From “The Decay of Lying” (1889)
  5. From De Profundis (1897; published 1962)
  6. Letter to Philip Houghton (February 1894)
  7. Letter to George Alexander (July 1894)
  8. Letter to George Alexander (September 1894)
  9. Letter to George Alexander (October 1894)
  10. Letter to an Unidentified Correspondent (February 1895)
  11. Letter to Lord Alfred Douglas (February 1895)
  12. Letter to R.V. Shone (February 1895)

Appendix I: From the Original Four-Act Version

  1. Passages Regarding Algernon’s and Ernest’s Past-due Accounts
  2. Passages Illuminating the Characters and Roles of Miss Prism and Canon Chasuble
  3. Additional Passages

Bibliography

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The Importance of Being Earnest 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 51 reviews.
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My theatre class is going to put on this production at our school in a few months and I can't wait. This play is unbelievably hilarious and witty as well. There are alot of big words that don't quite make sense but when you put it all together it creates the perfect classic story about betrayal and deception and diguise! I have read alot of plays in my 14 year life and this is definately at the very top of my favorites list!!!
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is such a brilliant play! Honestly it's simply hilarious and a must read for absolutely everyone! It's funny enough for reader's to be entertained throughout the play and it uses satirical prose to reveal a deeper meaning.
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Yay!
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It was awesome clasic situation. Really easy and fast read. Itvtruly leaves you with a lesson if being earnest
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