Impossible

( 33 )

Overview

When a high-powered gallery owner collides with a wildly offbeat artist, it’s the perfect recipe for disaster. But in her 63rd bestselling novel, Danielle Steel proves that when two hopelessly mismatched people share a love for art, a passion for each other, and a city like Paris, nothing is truly impossible…or is it?

Everything Sasha does is within the boundaries of tradition. Liam is sockless in December. Sasha is widowed, a woman who knows she was lucky enough to be married ...

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Impossible

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Overview

When a high-powered gallery owner collides with a wildly offbeat artist, it’s the perfect recipe for disaster. But in her 63rd bestselling novel, Danielle Steel proves that when two hopelessly mismatched people share a love for art, a passion for each other, and a city like Paris, nothing is truly impossible…or is it?

Everything Sasha does is within the boundaries of tradition. Liam is sockless in December. Sasha is widowed, a woman who knows she was lucky enough to be married to the most wonderful man in the world and thankful for every moment they had. Liam is half in and half out of a marriage that only a “wacky” artist could manage, and that his own impossibly impulsive behavior has helped tear apart. But while Sasha has been methodically building her father’s Parisian art gallery into an intercontinental success story, Liam has been growing into one of the most original and striking young painters of his time. So while the two are utterly unalike–and a nine-year age difference stares them squarely in the face–the miracle of art brings them crashing together. Now the question is, can Sasha guard her reputation while juggling a secret, somewhat scandalous relationship? And how can Liam, who lives for the moment, put up with a woman who insists on having things her own way, in her own style, and at her own time?

For Sasha, it’s a matter of keeping Liam hidden from her grown children and well-heeled clientele as she commutes between New York and Paris and two thriving galleries. For Liam, it’s about creating chaos out of order, bringing out the wild streak that Sasha barely knows she has, of choosing pizza over foie gras, and making love when others are busy making money. That is, until a family tragedy suddenly alters Liam’s life–and forces a choice and a sacrifice that neither one of them could have expected. But from the snow falling on the Tuileries to the joy of eating ice cream by candlelight, the artist and the art dealer have tasted perfection. And giving up now might just be the most impossible thing of all.

With unerring insight into the hearts of men and women– and into the soul of the artist –Danielle Steel takes us into a world of glamour and genius, priceless art and dazzling creativity. From the luxurious galleries of Europe to the endless beaches of the Hamptons, ImPossible weaves an extraordinary tale of love and compromise, of taking chances and counting blessings. With brilliant color and breathtaking emotion, Danielle Steel has written her most compelling novel to date.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Sasha de Suvery Boardman, the 48-year-old heroine of Steel's latest romance, knew she had it all-perfect marriage, two terrific grown kids, prestigious art galleries in Paris and New York, three luxury homes-until her husband's fatal heart attack. Now brokenhearted, but still beautiful and chic, she buries herself in her gallery work, until son Xavier introduces her to bad-boy painter Liam Allison, a gorgeous, "wacky" 39-year-old who instantly "[brings] out the mother in her." So she offers him a gallery contract, thus igniting a "torrid affair" punctuated by endless arguments about their nine-year age difference, his severe allergy to all forms of authority and their incompatible "lifestyles and appearances" (including his strong aversion to wearing socks). Despite Steel's repeated assurances that Liam is actually "innocent and likable," his petulance and impulsiveness are seriously off-putting, and the tortured romance has an icky, near-incestuous quality that may make some readers cringe. Others may just be bored by the sketchy, meandering plot, the skimpy characterizations and the hyperbolic, often stunningly repetitious style ("He was just a young man who liked to have fun and still acted like a boy at times, full of mischief and fun"). Even hardcore Steel addicts may not make it all the way through this one, her 63rd. (Mar. 1) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Steel's latest is set in the glamorous art worlds of Paris and New York. All the characters are drop-dead gorgeous, which lets the reader know right away that this is not the real world. Sasha, a rich, respected 49-year-old art dealer, has a fling with Liam, a wacky 39-year-old artist whom she represents. Sparks fly between them, and not just sexually; they really fight. Their age difference is the major issue; nothing else of interest goes on except for the opening of Liam's art show and peripheral family issues. Liam's paintings are so wonderful that the show sells out, but the reader has not been given the clues needed to visualize his work. Sasha, a mature, sensible businesswoman, somehow has no resistance to this inappropriate suitor, whose behavior is childlike down to his tantrums. The dialog is repetitive, with the couple fighting, making up, fighting, etc. Not one of Steel's better novels, but many of her fans will probably still enjoy it. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 11/1/04.]-Carol J. Bissett, New Braunfels P.L., TX Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Wealthy widow, artist lover. Sasha Boardman is attracted to an artist who shows in her internationally famous gallery, Suvery Contemporary. Liam Allison is so tall, so rugged in that cable-knit sweater, and so, so wacky. Why, he doesn't wear socks with shoes! Is Sasha, 50, ready for a walk on the wild side? Perhaps. Yet she still grieves decorously for her late husband, Arthur, a kind investment banker conveniently finished off by a heart attack in order for our heroine to Learn To Love Again. Her grown children will simply have to cope. Her son Xavier actually introduced her to Liam, but that was all about art-it never occurred to him that his devoted mother is a Lonely Woman With Needs. Liam also has Needs, but he can't be bought and he won't let Sasha boss him around, giving a stirring speech about his cherished independence. "Well, I'm an artist, Sasha. . . . and I won't let you cut off my balls." Sasha hastens to reassure him that she has no intention of doing so, and, somewhat later, her bitchy daughter Tatianna is appalled to encounter a naked Liam wandering about her mother's apartment in a postcoital glow. How can she do that in Daddy's bed? howls Tati. Xavier, the voice of reason, begs to differ. Other issues arise: it seems that Beth, Liam's first love, still evokes powerful if mixed emotions in his wayward heart. . . . When Beth and Liam's daughter falls through a giant, heretofore unseen, hole in the floor, severely injuring her spine, the plot stops dead in its tracks. Will Charlotte walk again? Will Liam return to Beth and make good on a long-ago promise? Will Sasha continue to suffer nobly through hospital vigils and late-night loneliness?Cartoonish prose and skimpystoryline do little for a notably unsexy romance from the indefatigable Steel (Echoes, 2004, etc., etc.).
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780440242017
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 1/31/2006
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Pages: 416
  • Sales rank: 576,955
  • Product dimensions: 4.17 (w) x 6.90 (h) x 1.16 (d)

Meet the Author

Danielle Steel has been hailed as one of the world’s most popular authors, with over 570 million copies of her novels sold. Her many international bestsellers include Rogue, Honor Thyself, Amazing Grace, Bungalow 2, Sisters, H.R.H., and other highly acclaimed novels. She is also the author of His Bright Light, the story of her son Nick Traina’s life and death.

Biography

When it comes to commanding bestseller lists, no writer can come close to Danielle Steel. Her work has been published in 47 countries, in 28 languages. She has been listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the author who has spent the most consecutive weeks on The New York Times bestseller list. She has not only published novels, but has written non-fiction, a book of poetry, and two series of children's books. Many of her books have been adapted for television movies, one of which (Jewels) was nominated for two Golden Globe awards. She has received the title of Chevalier of the distinguished Order of Arts and Letters by the French Government for her immense body of work. In short, to say that Steel is the single most popular living writer in the world is no overstatement.

Steel published her first novel, Going Home, when she was a mere 26 years old, and the book introduced readers to many of the themes that would dominate her novels for the next 30-odd years. It is an exploration of human relationships told dramatically, a story of the past's thrall on the present. Anyone familiar with Steel's work will recognize these themes as being close to her heart, as are familial issues, which are at the root of her many mega-sellers.

Although Steel has a reputation among critics as being a writer of fluffy, escapist fare, she never shies away from taking on dark subject matter, having addressed illnesses, incest, suicide, divorce, death, the Holocaust, and war in her work. Of course, even when she is handling unsavory topics, she does so entertainingly and with refinement. Her stories may often cross over into the realm of melodrama, but she never fails to spin a compelling yarn told with a skilled ear for dialogue and character, while consistently showing how one can overcome the greatest of tragedies. Ever prolific, she usually produces several books per year, often juggling multiple projects at the same time.

With all of the time and effort Steel puts into her work (she claims to sometimes spend as much as 20 hours a day at her keyboard), it is amazing that she still has time for a personal life. However, as one might assume from her work, family is still incredibly important to her, and she maintains a fairly private personal life. Fortunately for her millions of fans, she continues to devote more than a small piece of that life to them.

Good To Know

Along with her famed adult novels, Steel has also written two series of books for kids with the purpose of helping them through difficult situations, such as dealing with a new stepfather and coping with the death of a grandparent.

When Steel isn't working on her latest bestseller or spending time with her beloved family, she is devoting her time to one of several philanthropic projects to benefit the mentally ill, the homeless, and abused children.

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    1. Hometown:
      San Francisco, California
    1. Date of Birth:
      August 14, 1947
    2. Place of Birth:
      New York, New York
    1. Education:
      Educated in France. Also attended Parsons School of Design, 1963, and New York University, 1963-67
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

The Suvery Gallery in Paris was housed in an impressive building, an elegant eighteenth-century hotel particulier on the Faubourg St. Honore. Collectors came there by appointment, through the enormous bronze doors into the courtyard. Straight ahead was the main gallery, to the left the offices of Simon de Suvery, the owner. And to the right was his daughter's addition to the gallery, the contemporary wing. Behind the house was a large elegant garden filled with sculptures, mainly Rodins. Simon de Suvery had been there for more than forty years. His father, Antoine, had been one of the most important collectors in Europe, and Simon had been a scholar of Renaissance paintings and Dutch masters before opening the gallery. Now he was consulted by museums all over Europe, held in awe by private collectors, and admired although often feared by all who knew him.

Simon de Suvery was a daunting figure, tall, powerfully built, with stern features and dark eyes that pierced through you right to your soul. Simon had been in no hurry to get married. In his youth, he was too busy establishing his business to waste time on romance. At forty he had married the daughter of an important American collector. It had been a successful and happy union. Marjorie de Suvery had never involved herself directly in the gallery, which was well established before Simon married her. She was fascinated by it, and admired the work he showed. She loved him profoundly and had taken a passionate interest in everything he did. Marjorie had been an artist but never felt comfortable showing her work. She did genteel landscapes and portraits, and often gave them as gifts to friends. In truth, Simon had been affected but never impressed by her work. He was ruthless in his choices, merciless in his decisions for the gallery. He had a will of iron, a mind as sharp as a diamond, a keen business sense, and buried far, far beneath the surface, well concealed at all times, was a kind heart. Or so Marjorie said. Though not everyone believed her. He was fair to his employees, honest with his clients, and relentless in his pursuit of whatever he felt the gallery should have. Sometimes it took him years to acquire a particular painting or sculpture, but he never rested until it was his. He had pursued his wife, before their marriage, in much the same way. And once he had her, he kept her as a treasure—mostly to himself. He only socialized when he felt he had to, entertaining clients in one wing of the house.

They decided to have children late in their marriage. In fact it was Simon's decision, and they waited ten years to have a child. Knowing how Marjorie longed for children, Simon had finally acceded to her wishes, and was only mildly disappointed when Marjorie gave birth to a daughter and not a son. Simon was fifty when Sasha was born, and Marjorie thirty-nine. Sasha instantly became the love of her mother's life. They were constantly together. Marjorie spent hours with her, chortling and cooing, playing with her in the garden. She nearly went into mourning when Sasha began school, and they had to be apart. She was a beautiful and loving child. Sasha was an interesting blend of her parents. She had her father's dark looks and her mother's ethereal softness. Marjorie was an angelic-looking blonde with blue eyes, and looked like a madonna in an Italian painting. Sasha had delicate features like her mother, dark hair and eyes like her father, but unlike both her parents, Sasha was fragile and small. Her father used to tease her benevolently and say that she looked like a miniature of a child. But there was nothing small about Sasha's soul. She had the strength and iron will of her father, the warmth and gentle kindness of her mother, and the directness she learned early on from her father. She was four or five before he took serious notice of her, and once he did, all he spoke to her about was art. In his spare time, he would wander through the gallery with her, identifying paintings and masters, showing her their work in art books, and he expected her to repeat their names and even spell them, once she was old enough to write. Rather than rebelling, she drank it all in, and retained every shred of information her father imparted. He was very proud of her. And ever more in love with his wife, who became ill three years after Sasha was born.

Marjorie's illness was a mystery at first, and had all their doctors stumped. Simon secretly believed it was psychosomatic. He had no patience with illness or weakness, and thought that anything physical could be mastered and overcome. But rather than overcome it, Marjorie became weaker with time. It was a full year before they got a diagnosis in London, and a confirmation in New York. She had a rare degenerative disease that was attacking her nerves and muscles, and ultimately would cripple her lungs and heart. Simon chose not to accept the prognosis, and Marjorie was valiant about it, complaining little, doing whatever she could for as long as she was able, spending as much time as she had the strength for with her husband and daughter, and resting as much as possible in between. The disease never snuffed out her spirit, but eventually, as predicted, her body succumbed. She was bedridden by the time Sasha was seven, and died shortly after she turned nine. Despite all the doctors had told him, Simon was stunned. And so was Sasha. Neither of her parents had prepared Sasha for her mother's death. Sasha and Simon had both grown accustomed to Marjorie being interested in all they did, and participating in their lives, even while in bed. The sudden realization that she had disappeared from their world hit them both like a bomb, and fused Sasha and her father closer together than they had ever been. Other than the gallery, Sasha then became the focus of Simon's life.

Sasha grew up eating, drinking, sleeping, loving art. It was all she knew, all she did, and all she loved, other than her father. She was as devoted to him as he was to her. Even as a child, she knew as much about the gallery, and its complicated and intriguing workings, as any of his employees. And sometimes he thought, even as a young girl, she was smarter about it, and far more creative than anyone he employed. The only thing that annoyed him, and he made no bones about it, was her ever increasing passion for modern and contemporary art. Contemporary work irritated him particularly, and he never hesitated to call it junk, privately or otherwise. He loved and respected the Great Masters, and nothing else.

As her father had before her, Sasha attended the Sorbonne, and got a "license," a master's degree, in the history of art. And as she had promised her mother she would, she earned her PhD at Columbia in New York. Then she spent two years working as an intern at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, which rounded out her education. During that time, she returned frequently to Paris, sometimes just for a weekend, and Simon visited her as often as possible in New York. It gave him an excuse to visit his clients, as well as museums and collectors in the States. All he really wanted to do was see Sasha, and he used any excuse to do so. What he wanted more than anything else was for Sasha to come home. He was irritable and impatient during her years in New York.

The one thing Simon had never expected was the appearance of Arthur Boardman in Sasha's life. She met him the first week of her doctoral studies at Columbia. She was twenty-two at the time, and married him, despite her father's grumbling protests, within six months. At first, Simon was horrified at her marrying so young, and the only thing that mollified him, and made him consent to the marriage, was that Arthur assured his father-in-law that when Sasha was finished her studies and apprenticeship in New York, he would move to Paris with her and live there. Simon nearly made him sign it in blood. But even he couldn't resist seeing Sasha as happy as she was. Simon finally conceded that Arthur Boardman was a good man, and the right one for her.

Arthur was thirty-two, ten years older than Sasha. He had gone to Princeton, and had an MBA from Harvard. He had a respectable position in a Wall Street investment bank, which conveniently had a Paris office. Early on in their marriage, he began lobbying to run it. Within a year, their son Xavier was born. Two years later, Tatianna arrived. In spite of that, Sasha never missed a beat with her studies. Miraculously, both her babies managed to arrive in the summer, right after she finished her classes. She hired a nanny to help her with them while she was in school and working at the museum. She had learned how to keep many balls in the air, while watching her father run the gallery when she was a child. She loved her busy life, and adored Arthur and her two children. And although Simon was a somewhat hesitant grandfather at first, he warmed to it quickly. They were enchanting children.

Sasha spent every spare moment with them she could, singing the same songs and playing the same nursery games her mother had played with her. In fact, Tatianna looked so much like her maternal grandmother that it unnerved Simon at first, but as Tatianna grew older, he loved just sitting and watching her, and thinking of his late wife. It was like seeing her reborn as a little girl.

True to his word, Arthur moved the entire family to Paris when Sasha finished her two-year internship at the Met in New York. The investment bank was literally giving him the Paris office to run, at thirty-six, and had full confidence in him, as did Sasha. She was going to be even busier there than she had been in New York, where she'd been working only part time at the museum, and spent the rest of her time caring for her children. In Paris, she was going to work at the gallery with her father. She was ready for it now. He had agreed to let her leave by three o'clock every day, so she could be with her children. And she knew she would have a lot of entertaining to do for her husband. She returned to Paris, victorious, educated, excited, and undaunted, and thrilled to be home again. And so was Simon to have her home, and working with him at last. He had waited twenty-six years for that moment, and it had finally come, much to their mutual delight.

He still appeared as stern as he had when she was a child, but even Arthur noticed, once they moved to Paris, that Simon was softening almost imperceptibly with age. He even chatted with his grandchildren from time to time, although most of the time, when he visited, he preferred to just sit and observe them. He had never felt at ease with young children, not even Sasha when she was small. By the time they moved back to Paris, he was seventy-six years old. And Sasha's life began in earnest from that moment.

Their first decision was where to live, and Simon stunned them by solving their dilemma for them. Sasha had been planning to look for an apartment on the Left Bank. Their small family was already too large for the apartment the bank owned in the sixteenth arrondissement. Simon volunteered to move out of his wing of the house, the elegant three-floor domain he had occupied for his entire marriage, and the years before and after. He insisted it was far too big for him, and claimed the stairs were hard on his knees, although Sasha didn't quite believe him. Her father still walked for miles. He volunteered to move to the other side of the courtyard, on the top floor of the wing they used for additional offices and storage. He quickly set to work remodeling it with charming oeil de boeuf windows under a mansard roof, and put in a funny little motorized seat, which sped up and down the stairs, and delighted his grandchildren, when he let them ride it. He walked up the stairs beside them while they squealed with excitement. Sasha helped him with the decorating and remodeling, which instantly gave her an idea. Not one he liked at first. It was a plan she'd had for years, and had dreamed of all her life. She wanted to expand the gallery to include contemporary artists. The wing that had previously been used for storage was perfect for her plan. It was across the courtyard and from their offices and her father's new home. Admittedly, opening the ground floor would cramp their storage space, but she had already consulted an architect to build highly efficient storage racks upstairs. At her first mention of selling contemporary work, Simon went through the roof. He was not going to corrupt the gallery, and its venerable name, selling the garbage that Sasha liked, by unknown artists he insisted had no talent. It took her almost a year of bitter arguments to convince him.

It was only when she threatened to leave the gallery and set up shop on her own that Simon finally relented—albeit with considerable rancor and a ferocious amount of grumbling. Although gentler in style, Sasha was as tough as he was, and had held her ground. Once the plan was agreed to, she didn't even dare meet her new artists in their main offices because her father was so rude to them. But Sasha was as stubborn as he was. A year after they moved back to Paris, she opened the contemporary arm of the gallery with style and fanfare. And much to her father's astonishment, to unfailingly great reviews, not just because she was Sasha de Suvery but because she had an eye for good, solid contemporary work, just as her father did in what he knew best.

Remarkably, Sasha kept a foot in both worlds. She was knowledgeable about what he sold so competently and brilliant about newer work. By the time she was thirty, three years after she had opened Suvery Contemporary on his premises, it was the most important contemporary gallery in Paris, and perhaps in Europe. And she'd never had so much fun in her life. Nor had Arthur. He loved what she did, and supported her in every move, every decision, every investment, even more than her father, who remained reluctant though ultimately respectful of what she'd accomplished with contemporary work. In fact, she had brought his gallery into the present with a bang.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 2.5
( 33 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(6)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(7)

1 Star

(12)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 33 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2006

    EXCELLENT!!!! DEFINITELY MUST READ!!!

    This book puts you through the full emotional range of experiences. It made me laugh, sad, and it's full of suspense. If you want to go on an emotional rollercoaster, you MUST read this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 9, 2013

    IT TOOK ME AWAY, BUT WHAT SOLD ME ON IT WAS HEARING IT READ ON S

    IT TOOK ME AWAY, BUT WHAT SOLD ME ON IT WAS HEARING IT READ ON SIRUS RADIO ON THE BOOK CHANNEL. I HAD TO BUY IT BECAUSE I KEPT MISSING PARTS OF IT. I LOVED IT.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2012

    Impossible

    I love her books

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2008

    While not an impossible book to finish, there was a struggle for gradification.

    Danielle Steel is obviously a natural born writer. With over 50 some odd titles under her belt one would think that creative story lines would come rather naturally. Unfortuantely, in Impossible this is not the case. While it is quite a quick read, simple story line and vocabulary, the plot is tired and repetitive. If you enjoy all her novels then I guess this one would be no exception but otherwise stear more towards one of her elder novels.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 22, 2007

    Very Disapponited

    I have read all of her books but this is the worst book she has wrote. it is boring, nothing happens and I had to force myself to finish it...Dont buy it!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 25, 2007

    A reviewer

    This is BAD. I've read almost all of DS's books and this one had me dying. I want my 2 weeks back. HORRIBLE, TERRIBLE, BAD.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2006

    JUST AWFUL

    'Possibly' the worst book I've ever read, but at 30,000 feet 'impossible' to throw out the window! Boring and repetitive to the max!! If this is the quality of Ms. Steel's recent work she needs to find a new hobby!! Don't waste your money, time or enjoyment on this one!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2006

    ImPossible

    This was the worst book she has ever written. I couldn't finish it - I finally just put it down. This book is very repetitive and boring. I'm glad I only purchased the paper back and not the hard cover, I would have been upset after I had spent all that money.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2006

    Worst Steel Novel Yet

    I would like to begin with, I am a huge Steel fan. However, this book, upset me. I had to put the book down several times, tempted to throw it away. Sasha, the main character, who was supposed to be the strong, intelligent woman, continally put up with a man whose tantrums are worse than my four year olds. The on again, off again relationship bored me to tears. Women are not that dumb, to constantly take back a man who keeps having tantrums and dumping them over little things. Definately not her best writing.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2006

    Impossible was impossible to get through

    The storyline was boring and repetitive - definitely not one of Danielle Steel's better efforts. I'm normally not disappointed by Steel's books but there is a first time for everything.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2006

    A little Disappointed with This One from Steel

    I have been Steel's fan since the Wheels.Of course I bought this one'Impossible'.Indeed, it's almost impossible for me to believe that she wrote this one.The story is the same old song of a sad business lady whose husband died and later found a younger man and ran into a heartbreaking situations. It's kind of stale. When I compared this one to the House, I can only give her a three for Impossible.Sorry.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2006

    It's not 'Impossible'...

    I agree this was different than most Steel's novels..but the idea of an older, beautiful, business oriented woman attracted to a younger, handsome, artistic man appealed to me. The heartache of losing the love of your life and the possibility to find happiness again despite all the obstacles of age, children, and being accepted by those around you.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2006

    Wacky Boring Disjointed

    I lost count of the work 'wacky'. Danielle needs a Thesaurus. Book was boring and repetitive, the same conversation, situation, instance, happening, over and over, and no one I know has such a relationship with their grown children. I know this is fiction but c'mon...... I tried Danielle Steels books a few times and wondered again why I purchased Impossible. A waste, in any language. Am I the only reader who sees that the 'emperor is not wearing clothes?'

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2006

    Long-winded and a Steele disappointment.

    I always expect Steele's heroines to be strong, intelligent, independent, etc. Sasha was an example of immaturity and how to be a door mat - really, at her age and experience. Too many fill-in words that took away from the true background, description of situations, feelings... quite boring - turn two (2) pages and still be in the same spot you were. A very slow mover. I wouldn't recommend this book to anyone. Steele needs to come back up a notch or five!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 27, 2005

    Almost impossible to finish

    This is probably the first Danielle Steel book I had to make myself finish...neither Sasha or Liam sparked my interest, 9 years is not that much difference in age, and how many times can the author use the word 'impossible' in the storyline?? Make up and break up was the whole storyline, fickle characters made a fickle story...

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 18, 2005

    One of her worst books

    Boring as ever!! Sasha the main character is a loser for accepting Liam into her life. The man just continually broke her heart.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 14, 2005

    I loved it.......

    yes Sasha sounded strong but her heart was broken when her husband died....and yes Liam had to grow up....but they both left each other for family first and realized they needed each other more.....their love for each other was so strong it brought them back together

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2005

    Utterly Disappointing

    This book was not only the worst Danielle Steel's book I had ever read but also the worst book EVER... The storyline and the characters were dull to the extreme. The same lines were repeated throughout the book and it was as though several pages were just copied over and over again! I would not recommend this book to anyone for any reason!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 13, 2005

    hmm, definitely not her best

    I have read all of Danielle Steel's published books, this book was okay, I have read better.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2005

    A Huge Disappointment

    I have read all of Steels books and this has to be one of the worst. Repitious and boring with no surprizes.Not even worth it in paperback..

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