Impossible Presence: Surface and Screen in the Photogenic Era / Edition 2

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Overview


Impossible Presence brings together new work in film studies, critical theory, art history, and anthropology for a multifaceted exploration of the continuing proliferation of visual images in the modern era. It also asks what this proliferation—and the changing technologies that support it—mean for the ways in which images are read today and how they communicate with viewers and spectators.
Framed by Terry Smith's introduction, the essays focus on two kinds of strangeness involved in experiencing visual images in the modern era. The first, explored in the book's first half, involves the appearance of oddities or phantasmagoria in early photographs and cinema. The second type of strangeness involves art from marginalized groups and indigenous peoples, and the communicative formations that result from the trafficking of images between people from vastly different cultures. With a stellar list of contributors, Impossible Presence offers a wide-ranging look at the fate of the visual image in modernity, modern art, and popular culture.

Contributors:
Jean Baudrillard
Marshall Berman
Jeremy Gilbert-Rolfe
Elizabeth Grosz
Tom Gunning
Peter Hutchings
Fred R. Myers
Javier Sanjines
Richard Shiff
Hugh J. Silverman
Terry Smith

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780226763859
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • Publication date: 9/28/2001
  • Edition description: 1
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 309
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author


Terry Smith is a professor of art history and the director of the Power Institute, Centre for Art and Visual Culture, Unversity of Sydney, Australia. He is the editor of In Visible Touch: Modernism and Masculinity, also published by the University of Chicago Press.
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Table of Contents


Preface and Acknowledgments
Introduction
Enervation, viscerality: the fate of the image in Modernity
Terry Smith
Chapter 1
Too much is not enough: metamorphoses of Times Square
Marshall Berman
Chapter 2
New thresholds of vision: instantaneous photography and the early cinema of Lumière
Tom Gunning
Chapter 3
Through a fishwife's eye: between Benjamin and Deleuze on the timely image
Peter J. Hutchings
Chapter 4
Realism of low resolution: digitisation and modern painting
Richard Shiff
Chapter 5
Beauty and the contemporary sublime
Jeremy Gilbert-Rolfe
Chapter 6
Andy Warhol: snobbish machine
Jean Baudrillard
Chapter 7
Andy Warhol: chiasmatic visibility
Hugh J. Silverman
Chapter 8
Naked
Elizabeth Grosz
Chapter 9
Visceral Cholos: desublimation and the critique of Mestizaje in the Bolivian Andes
Javier Sanjines
Chapter 10
Traffic in culture: on knowing Pintupi painting
Fred R. Myers
Chapter 11
Warped Space: architectural anxiety in digital culture
Anthony Vidler
List of Images
Notes on Contributors
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