In a Glass Grimmly (Grimm Series #2)

( 64 )

Overview

More Grimm tales await in the harrowing, hilarious companion to a beloved new classic

Take caution ahead—
Oversize plant life, eerie amphibious royalty, and fear-inducing creatures abound.

Lest you enter with dread.
Follow Jack and Jill as they enter startling new ...

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In a Glass Grimmly (Grimm Series #2)

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Overview

More Grimm tales await in the harrowing, hilarious companion to a beloved new classic

Take caution ahead—
Oversize plant life, eerie amphibious royalty, and fear-inducing creatures abound.

Lest you enter with dread.
Follow Jack and Jill as they enter startling new landscapes that may (or may not) be scary, bloody, terrifying, and altogether true.

Step lively, dear reader . . .
Happily ever after isn't cutting it anymore.

In this companion novel to Adam Gidwitz's widely acclaimed, award-winning debut, A Tale Dark & Grimm, Jack and Jill explore a new set of tales from the Brothers Grimm and others, including Jack and the Beanstalk and The Frog Prince.

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  • In a Glass Grimmly
    In a Glass Grimmly  

Editorial Reviews

The New York Times Book Review
Each story flows into the next with humor, cleverness and an oddly absorbing realism…Gidwitz plays fast and loose, with reality a springboard from which to reapproach age-old stories.
—Holly Black
Publishers Weekly
The grossness quotient has gone up in Gidwitz’s companion to A Tale Dark and Grimm, his grisly reimagining of classic fairy tales. Translation: this second foray is even more enjoyable than the author’s acclaimed debut. The protagonists in this installment are Jack, Jill, and a talking frog, whose adventures begin separately in reworkings of “The Frog Prince” and “The Emperor’s New Clothes,” before the three join forces in “Jack and the Bean-stalk.” Parental cruelties are more ordinary this time—mockery, neglect, and recrimination—but what the children find in their quest for the Seeing Glass is horrifying enough to compensate for any perceived softness at the outset. When Jill rescues Jack atop the beanstalk by accepting the giants’ eating challenge, even the Monty Python gang might cringe at the results—it’s the phrase “no guts, no glory” brought to Technicolor life. Gidwitz can do nuance, too, as Jill’s perilous encounter with a sympathetic mermaid demonstrates. Technically polished, and with more original content, this romp has lost none of the edge of its predecessor. Ages 10–up. Agent: Sarah Burnes, the Gernert Company. (Sept.)
VOYA - Erin Wyatt
This companion to A Tale Dark & Grimm (Dutton, 2010) echoes the tone and style of the earlier installment as it follows Jack and Jill on their adventures. While the duo falls down a hill and Jack has a serious head injury, much more awaits the two cousins as they try to find happiness through acceptance. Feeling dejected, the cousins take on a quest for a valuable lost glass in exchange for the fulfillment of their deepest desires upon the return of the item. They swear on their lives, and are off on a harrowing, humorous journey. Interjecting throughout, the narrator has an active role, warning of gore and violence ahead, all the while reminding the readers that the true stories behind the popular fairy tales they have heard are the ones unfolding on the pages of the book. Gidwitz pulls from many fairy tales, including Jack and the Beanstalk, The Frog Prince, and The Emperor’s New Clothes, to weave his story together and makes up some lore of his own along the way. It is an enjoyable, creative read rife with fairy tale violence and injury befalling the intrepid heroes and their clever, cautious, talking three-legged frog sidekick. The adults in this novel are not kind or loving, leaving the children to their own devices. Ultimately, the cousins find happiness in themselves and each other as they learn to really see themselves. Ages 11 to 14.
School Library Journal
Gr 3 Up—Gidwitz is back with a second book that, if possible, outshines A Tale Dark & Grimm (Dutton, 2010). Once upon a time, in a faraway kingdom, cousins Jack and Jill have had a particularly tough day. Jack has a mean-boy problem: he's bullied and tortured by a clique whom he hero-worships. Jill has a mirror-obsessed, pettily cruel mother who lets her daughter walk naked, unaware, in front of the entire kingdom. But our woe-ridden hero and heroine are in for far worse: a skyscraping beanstalk, a fratlike group of giants, a deadly mermaid, and an oversize fire-breathing salamander show up before these brave, loving, and realistically flawed children get their happily ever after. This book, like the first, features a bold-font "storyteller" who introduces, explains, and comments on the story as it unfolds-usually with alacrity as he promises gore in the pages ahead, but with a fair dose of true insight into the characters and what makes them, like us, human. However, the chapters derive only loosely from fairy tales; they are mostly Gidwitz's inventions, which allows the character and story arcs to congeal into a satisfying whole. Most delightfully, that snarky, insightful narrator reminds us that stories were once verbal, communal experiences. This book begs to be read aloud, preferably to children who delight equally in hearing about pools of vomit and blood and about triumphant heroes.—Allison Bruce, The Children's Storefront, New York City
Kirkus Reviews
The author of A Tale Dark and Grimm (2010) starts over--sending young Jack and Jill on a fresh quest for self-knowledge through trials and incidents drawn (stolen, according to the author) from a diverse array of European folk and fairy tales. Foolishly pledging their lives on finding the long-lost Seeing Glass, cousins Jack and Jill, with a three-legged talking frog to serve as the now-requisite comical animal sidekick, set out from the kingdom of Märchen. They climb a beanstalk, visit a goblin market and descend into a fire-belching salamander's lair (and then down its gullet). In a chamber of bones ("It gave new meaning to the term rib vaulting"), they turn the tables on a trio of tricksy child eaters. Injecting authorial warnings and commentary as he goes, Gidwitz ensures that each adventure involves at least severe embarrassment or, more commonly, sudden death, along with smacking great washes of gore, vomit and (where appropriate) stomach acid. Following hard tests of wit and courage, the two adventurers, successful in both ostensible and real quests, return to tell their tales to rapt children (including one named "Hans Christian," and another "Joseph," or "J.J.") and even, in the end, mend relations with their formerly self-absorbed parents. Not so much a set of retellings as a creative romp through traditional and tradition-based story-scapes, compulsively readable and just as read-out-loudable. (source note) (Fantasy. 11-14)
Holly Black
"Each story flows into the next with humor, cleverness and an oddly absorbing realism…Gidwitz plays fast and loose, with reality a springboard from which to reapproach age-old stories."
Children's Literature - Suzanna E. Henshon
What is it like to live in a topsy-turvey fairytale landscape? In this companion to A Tale Dark & Grimm, Adam Gidwitz once again brings magic in his renditions of the adventures of Jack and Jill. Readers will follow Jack and Jill into a dangerous world, where a narrator seems to leap off the page with his wit and wisdom and commentary about the events. Gidwitz has taken the old tales from Hans Christian Andersen and the Brothers Grimm, refreshing them with humor and sarcasm that is fun to read and more up-to-date with the current field of children's literature. Reading along, one will not help laughing whenever the narrator butts in: it is hard to resist a narrator who warns you not to turn the page because you are about to read a horrible story. Indeed, this book contained a flavor reminiscent to Daniel Handler's A Series of Unfortunate Events, but Gidwitz's narrator is bewitching and fun to follow. Young readers will enjoy reading about Jack and Jill and their exciting (and sometimes horrid) adventures in a new and exciting fairytale world. Reviewer: Suzanna E. Henshon, Ph.D.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780525425816
  • Publisher: Penguin Young Readers Group
  • Publication date: 9/27/2012
  • Series: Grimm Series , #2
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 146,055
  • Age range: 10 - 14 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.86 (w) x 8.34 (h) x 1.14 (d)

Meet the Author

Adam Gidwitz

Adam Gidwitz is an elementary school teacher and storyteller. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

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Read an Excerpt

Fairy tales were, in a word, horrible.

Two hundred years ago, in Germany, the Brothers Grimm first wrote down that version of Cinderella in which the stepsisters slice off pieces of their feet and get their eyes pecked out. In England, a man names Joseph Jacobs collected tales like Jack the Giant Killer, which is about a boy named Jack who goes around murdering giants in the most gruesome and grotesque ways imaginable. And there was this guy called Hans Christian Andersen, who lived in Denmark and wrote fairy tales filled with sadness and humiliation and loneliness. Even Mother Goose’s rhymes could get pretty dark—after all, Jack and Jill go up a hill, and then Jack falls down and breaks his head open.

Yes, fairy tales were horrible. In the original sense of the word.

But even these horrible fairy tales and nursery rhymes aren’t true. They’re just stories. Right?

Not exactly.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 64 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(51)

4 Star

(9)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

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1 Star

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 64 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2012

    Cant wait till it comes out!!!

    3 words. Can. Not. Wait.

    10 out of 21 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2012

    BEST BOOK EVER

    I loved the first book but this ones even better with all sorts of twists and turn and u just like me will be forced to read throuh the book sooo fast its an amazing book

    9 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2012

    Great!

    I loved this book! Since I'm really interested in the Grimm fairytales, this made a lot of since to me! The story line was great and I also loved A Tale Dark and Grimm! I recommend this!

    8 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 8, 2012

    Adam Gidwitz's A TALE DARK & GRIMM was an unbelievable wonde

    Adam Gidwitz's A TALE DARK & GRIMM was an unbelievable wonder: a children's book that combined a whirlwind of Grimm's fairytales that became a salve and benediction to all those readers with lost playground days and unresolved glances to the rearview mirror. ATD&G worked (and continues to work) on multiple levels, and spoke many languages, but it had surprise on it's side, and a killer ending. So, the expectations were very high for IN A GLASS GRIMMLY, and it does that rare thing in literature: it does not try to be better than it's predecessor, but instead, to stand proudly beside it and tell an equally enthralling story.

    IN A GLASS GRIMMLY is truly more of a companion piece than an actual sequel to ATD&G. In Gidwitz's mythology, about sixty years have passed, and we are set to embark with with Gretel's granddaughter, Jill, and Hansel's grandson, Jack. We have left the Kingdom of Grimm behind, and now find ourselves in the Land of Marchen (basically a change from Germany to Denmark.) But, I believe, this world is darker, and there is a gloom that hangs over this land because of a goblin prank that went terribly wrong (my connecting of the dots and clues... other readers might discover other paths that have a different interpretive clarity, too). The promise of Hansel's & Gretel's victory has been short-lived, and we are left with Jack, Jill, and Frog trying to right an ancient wrong that will permit, at the very least, a simple yet seismic reset on their lives, and the lives of the characters that stand along the road. Everyone you meet is troubled and fractured; much like the legendary mirror at the tale's motivational center. I will say that the middle journey of IAGG might even be more strange and engaging with these gaggle of broken characters. Their stories are surprising and contain the requisite controlled blood splatter that makes for the best discoveries.

    The particular grain of bread found in IAGG is much darker than the one that sustained ATD&G, but I do not not believe that this loaf is without nutrition. On the contrary, there is great familiarity in these new (old) stories, and now he's added Hans Christian Andersen's lantern to Jacob & Wilhem's dim hallways. In these undiscovered pages and days, there are Magic Trees, Brotherhoods of Giants, Melancholy Mermaids, Homicidal Goblins, Fractured Mirrors, and an Eddie... And each one of these strange travelers has sat noisily beside me, and guided this fulfilling reading experience. And even when the Ravens (the hilarious threads of continuity from the previous story, the ones that link the two worlds with such warmth and humor) yelled gently and sarcastically to get me back on the path, I realized that these voices had already become some of my closest friends. Thank you, Adam Gidwitz, for another glorious story that sits like a old friend's hand on my shoulder, and like a frosted window unto my childhood.

    Relax, it's only scary for just a little while (but oh, what a delight it is to be reminded, again)!

    7 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2012

    OMG !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    I'M SPEECHLES..................... BECAUSE RIGHT NOW MY 5TH/6TH HOUR TEACHER IS CURRENTLY READING A TALE DARK AND GRIMM AND WE'RE ONLY AT CHAPTER 3 AND I'VE ALREADY FALLEN IN LOVE WITH THE BOOK BUT THIS ONE LOOKS SO GOOD I DON'T KNOW WHAT TO DO BOTH OF THE BOOKS LOOK SO GOOD THAT I MIGHT PASS OUT TRYING TO READ THEM BOTH !!!!!!!!! NOW I HAVEN'T READ THIS BOOK YET BUT NOTHING IS STOPPING FROM READING IT NOTHING AT ALL !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    6 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2012

    Yes

    Cant wait to read. I actuly met adam at local library (real nice guy)

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2012

    Awesomeness

    ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS I HAVE EVER READ

    3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 12, 2013

    First book great, second book epic at a ballistic level and also... horrible. You will know what I mean if you speak Adam Gwitz

    Awesomley epic

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2013

    Perfect

    It was very very gooooooooooood i could not stop reading it it was amazing and thats comming from an 11 year old

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2012

    A Tale Dark and Grimm

    You must read A Tale Dark and Grimm if you like this book! A Tale Dark and Grimm was AMAZING! Once apon a time fairytales were AWESOME!

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 4, 2012

    Chez

    Cant wait too

    2 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 8, 2014

    BEST BOOK EVER

    READ IT. TAWK DURTY 2 MEEE

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2014

    <3

    I LOVE this book

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2014

    OMG! I loved this sequel so much!!!! When I read this I couldn't

    OMG!
    I loved this sequel so much!!!! When I read this I couldn't put it down, I just love the twisted mixed up fairytales that Adam writes. I love how the author just comes out and talks to the reader in the bold print. A lot times he's really funny. I loved the interesting and brave journey Hansel and Gretel went through just to get the seeing glass for a creepy old lady. The funniest character had to be the frog named Frog, how creative. I'm also reading  The Grimm Conclusion. So far so good.
    Well I hope everybody reads this series!!!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 22, 2013

    Hello author of daughter of charm!!!!

    Hello! My name is Percabeth!!! I would just like to say great job!!!! Keep up the great work!! And just a favor, when you have time, could you read my story. Its called The Sorceress' Labyrinth in The Lost Hero. Sorry if you have to scrowl down a bit. Please give my thoughts and help spread the word!!! THANKS!!! YOU ARE AMAZING!!!!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 2, 2013

    Good

    Awesome book

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2013

    BEST BOOK IN THE WORLD : D

    If you ask my about this i would say you just have to read it

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2013

    Creepy

    Two words. Creepy. Horrifying. Bloody. YES. I meant three words

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2013

    What a book

    It flows from chapter to chapter with ease. First you review them you start back up with the story linw.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2012

    AWESOME!!!!!!

    This book brings adventure and leaves you anxious to read more.It had me flipping every page!I hope readers enjoy both of the books adam gidwitz has written and read more!!!<3 (: (:

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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