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In Defense of Single-Parent Families
     

In Defense of Single-Parent Families

by Nancy E. Dowd
 

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Single-parent families succeed. Within these families children thrive, develop, and grow, just as they do in a variety of family structures. Tragically, they must do so in the face of powerful legal and social stigma that works to undermine them.

As Nancy E. Dowd argues in this bold and original book, the justifications for stigmatizing single-parent

Overview

Single-parent families succeed. Within these families children thrive, develop, and grow, just as they do in a variety of family structures. Tragically, they must do so in the face of powerful legal and social stigma that works to undermine them.

As Nancy E. Dowd argues in this bold and original book, the justifications for stigmatizing single-parent families are founded largely on myths, myths used to rationalize harshly punitive social policies. Children, in increasing numbers, bear the brunt of those policies. In this generation, more than two-thirds of all children will spend some time in a single-parent family before reaching age 18. The damage done in the name of justified stigma, therefore, harms a great many children.

Dowd details the primary justifications for stigmatizing single-parent families, marshalling an impressive array of resources about single parents that portray a very different picture of these families. She describes them in all their forms, with particular attention to the differential treatment given never-married and divorced single parents, and to the impact of gender, race, and class. Emphasizing that all families face significant conflicts between work and family responsibilities, Dowd argues many two-parent families, in fact, function as single-parent caregiving households. The success or failure of families, she contends, has little to do with form. Many of the problems faced by single-parent families mirror problems faced by all families.

Illustrating the harmful impact of current laws concerning divorce, welfare, and employment, Dowd makes a powerful case for centering policy around the welfare and equality of all children. A thought-provoking examination of the stereotypes, realities and possibilities of single-parent families, In Defense of Single-Parent Families asks us to consider the true purpose or goal of a family.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Dowd (law, Univ. of Florida) has written a strong argument in favor of public support for needy families bringing up young children, particularly those where single parents are sole caretakers. She explains how society stigmatizes single parents, especially those who are female and black, as immoral, shiftless, and unworthy of help. Not only denigrated, female single parents are also victims of gender hierarchy in the application of divorce, employment, and welfare laws. Dowd argues that the quality of family functioning is related more to the level of economic and social support present than to the number of parents. She feels strongly that society should support in meaningful ways the nurture of children and their caregivers regardless of family structure. A thoughtful analysis of a serious problem in this country; recommended for professionals, academics, and the public.-Suzanne W. Wood, SUNY Coll. of Technology, Alfred
Booknews
Dowd (law, U. of Florida) argues that the justifications for stigmatizing single-parent families are founded on myths used to rationalize harshly punitive social policies that hit children hardest. She says that many two-parent families in fact function as single-caregiving environments anyway, that the two kind of families have some unique and some common problems, that the failure or success of a family has little to do with its form, and that single-parent children often grow up with more admirable traits than their more conventional contemporaries. She looks hard at how the laws and other policies lay extra burdens on families, and recommends reforms. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
Choice
Dowd does a good job of explaining how discrimination in the workplace and the devaluation of those who provide child care works against the single parent. . . . Should provoke lively classroom discussion.
National Law Journal
If there is a less-popular cause in this country than single-parent families, it doesn't come readily to mind. But Dowd presents a very different view of single-parent families as pioneers in the development of nonpatriarchal family structures, arguing that the perceived inferiority of single-parent families has more to do with bias and poverty than the lack of a male figure, and that we need legal change to increase employment, income and community support.
From the Publisher
"If there is a less-popular cause in this country than single-parent families, it doesn't come readily to mind. But Dowd presents a very different view of single-parent families as pioneers in the development of nonpatriarchal family structures, arguing that the perceived inferiority of single-parent families has more to do with bias and poverty than the lack of a male figure, and that we need legal change to increase employment, income and community support."

-National Law Journal

"A strong argument in favor of public support for needy families bringing up young children, particularly those where single parents are the sole caretakers. . . . A thoughtful analysis of a serious problem in this country; recommended for professionals, academics, and the public."

-Library Journal

"Dowd does a good job of explaining how discrimination in the workplace and the devaluation of those who provide child care works against the single parent. . . . Should provoke lively classroom discussion."

-Choice

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780814744246
Publisher:
New York University Press
Publication date:
05/01/1999
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
222
Sales rank:
1,161,000
File size:
2 MB

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What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

"A strong argument in favor of public support for needy families bringing up young children, particularly those where single parents are the sole caretakers. . . . A thoughtful analysis of a serious problem in this country; recommended for professionals, academics, and the public."

-Library Journal,

"Dowd does a good job of explaining how discrimination in the workplace and the devaluation of those who provide child care works against the single parent. . . . Should provoke lively classroom discussion."

-Choice,

"If there is a less-popular cause in this country than single-parent families, it doesn't come readily to mind. But Dowd presents a very different view of single-parent families as pioneers in the development of nonpatriarchal family structures, arguing that the perceived inferiority of single-parent families has more to do with bias and poverty than the lack of a male figure, and that we need legal change to increase employment, income and community support."

-National Law Journal

Meet the Author

Nancy E. Dowd is Director of the Center for Children and Families at the University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law and holds the David H. Levin Chair in Family Law. She is the author of several books, including Redefining Fatherhood (NYU Press).

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