In Dublin's Fair City (Molly Murphy Series #6)

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Overview

Praise for Rhys Bowen

"A lot of fun and some terrific historical writing. Fans of the British cozy will love it, and so will readers of historical fiction."

—-Toronto Globe and Mail on Oh Danny Boy

"Its enjoyable charm and wit will appeal to a cross-section of mystery fans."

—-Baltimore Sun on Oh Danny Boy

"It's hard not to be charmed by this young immigrant woman who fled murder charges in Ireland to become a...

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In Dublin's Fair City (Molly Murphy Series #6)

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Overview

Praise for Rhys Bowen

"A lot of fun and some terrific historical writing. Fans of the British cozy will love it, and so will readers of historical fiction."

—-Toronto Globe and Mail on Oh Danny Boy

"Its enjoyable charm and wit will appeal to a cross-section of mystery fans."

—-Baltimore Sun on Oh Danny Boy

"It's hard not to be charmed by this young immigrant woman who fled murder charges in Ireland to become a detective in turn-of-the-century New York."

—-Pittsburgh Post-Gazette on In Like Flynn

"Molly grows ever more engaging against a vibrant background of New York's dark side at the turn of the century."

—-Kirkus Reviews (starred review) on For the Love of Mike

"It's always a delight to discover a new book from the pen of Rhys Bowen."

—-Tampa Tribune & Times on Murphy's Law

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Set in 1903, Bowen's sixth brisk Molly Murphy historical (after 2006's Oh Danny Boy) takes the Irish immigrant to New York City back to the Emerald Isle for an assignment to find a theater impresario's long-lost sister, left behind when his family fled the potato famine 50 years earlier. Even though Molly had left Ireland under a cloud of suspicion herself, she bids a temporary farewell to her beau, New York police captain Daniel Sullivan. The voyage begins auspiciously when a famous actress offers Molly her first class stateroom, but Molly's discovery of a corpse in her sumptuous bed is only the beginning of a complicated, dangerous journey. In Dublin, she becomes embroiled in the Irish struggle for freedom and finds herself a target for murder. With a riveting plot capped off by a dramatic conclusion, Bowen captures the passion and struggles of the Irish people at the turn of the 20th century. (Mar.)

Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
"May you die in Ireland" may be more than just a toast. Detective Molly Murphy (Oh Danny Boy, 2006, etc.) jumps at a chance to go to Ireland despite the fact she may still be wanted for assault. Theatrical impresario Tommy Burke has recently learned that he had a sister who was left behind when his family fled the Old Sod. Since he's already rescued his ne'er-do-well nephew several times, he plans to leave his sister his fortune if she's still alive. So Molly sails for Queenstown on the Majestic, where famous actress Oona Sheehan persuades her to change cabins so that she can escape her admirers. Molly enjoys the luxury of first class until Oona's maid is murdered. The police put Molly on the suspect list when they learn that Oona never embarked. In her Dublin hotel, Molly discovers that Oona's trunks are packed with rifles. As she travels the Irish countryside searching for the missing Mary Ann Burke, she becomes involved with groups working to free Ireland from the British yoke. Learning that two of her brothers are committed to the Republican cause, she becomes the linchpin of a handsome Irishman's scheme to free her brother and others from prison, a plan that is nearly the death of her. The feisty Molly rarely disappoints in this rousing yarn seasoned with a dash of Irish history.
From the Publisher
Praise for Rhys Bowen

"A lot of fun and some terrific historical writing. Fans of the British cozy will love it, and so will readers of historical fiction."

—-Toronto Globe and Mail on Oh Danny Boy

"Bowen parcels out bits of her plot with an impeccable sense of timing and...has written another outstanding mystery."

—-Library Journal on Oh Danny Boy

"Its enjoyable charm and wit will appeal to a cross-section of mystery fans."

—-Baltimore Sun on Oh Danny Boy

"It's hard not to be charmed by this young immigrant woman who fled murder charges in Ireland to become a detective in turn-of-the-century New York."

—-Pittsburgh Post-Gazette on In Like Flynn

"Molly grows ever more engaging against a vibrant background of New York's dark side at the turn of the century."

—-Kirkus Reviews (starred review) on For the Love of Mike

"It's always a delight to discover a new book from the pen of Rhys Bowen."

—-Tampa Tribune & Times on Murphy's Law

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312997021
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 3/4/2008
  • Series: Molly Murphy Series , #6
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Pages: 304
  • Product dimensions: 4.22 (w) x 6.68 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Rhys Bowen

Rhys Bowen’s novels have received a remarkable number of awards and accolades, including the Anthony and Agatha Awards for mystery as well as the Herodotus Award and the Bruce Alexander Historical Award. Rhys is also the author of the Edgar Award nominated Evan Evans series. Born in England, she now lives in San Rafael, California, with her husband.

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Read an Excerpt

In Dublin's Fair City
By Bowen, Rhys St. Martin's Paperbacks

Copyright © 2008 Bowen, Rhys
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780312997021


Excerpt
Be careful what you wish for.” 
That was another of my mother’s favorite sayings—one of the few in her wealth of warnings that didn’t predict a bad end, hell fire, and eternal damnation. It was brought out any time I expressed my childhood ambitions to see Dublin one day, to dance at a ball like a real lady, to own a horse and carriage, or just to free myself from our dreary life in Ballykillin. The end of the sentence was rarely said, but always implied—“or you may get it.”
Now it had finally come back to haunt me. My mother would undoubtedly be chuckling her head off in heaven, or wherever she was spending the hereafter. Ever since I’d arrived in New York and met Captain Daniel Sullivan, I suppose I had secretly nourished a hope that we could be together some day. Although I told myself that this would never happen, also that he was unreliable, two-faced, and all around bad news, I had never quite managed to put him out of my thoughts or my heart. And now it seemed I was being offered as much of Daniel Sullivan’s company as I ever wanted. More, in fact.
Three weeks had gone by since his release from The Tombs on bail, and he was still charged with taking bribes from a gang member, being in the pay of a gang, and setting up an illegal prize fight. Since then he’dreceived no news on his future or his fate, although we now knew who had so carefully plotted his downfall. It was a horrible way to be living, to be sure—like walking on eggs—and Daniel wasn’t taking it well. He was used to being cock o’ the walk, a powerful man who commanded the respect of his colleagues among the New York police and who had connections to the Four Hundred—the highest-born families in town. Those weeks in The Tombs had taxed him physically and mentally so that he was now alternately moping or prowling around like a caged tiger.
And much of his prowling was being done at my house, which is why I was pacing the floor myself one muggy September afternoon. Daniel had finally managed to engage the services of a reputable attorney, who was working on his behalf, and had arranged a meeting today with the police commissioner, Mr. John Partridge. And I was left to pace the floor at home, wondering if he’d return a free man, reinstated at his job. Please let him be freed from this terrible burden, I found myself praying, even though I was not much one for chats with the Almighty. And please let him get his old job back and leave me in peace. I was appalled at myself immediately. Wasn’t I supposed to be in love with Daniel Sullivan? Hadn’t I seriously considered the prospect of marrying him some day? And yet here I was, dreading the thought of his presence. What about for better or worse, richer, poorer, in sickness or health? This marriage question would require some serious rethinking, provided Daniel was ever in a position to ask for my hand, of course.
While I waited I cleaned the house feverishly, polishing my few pieces of furniture till I could see my face in them and still no Daniel. Surely the interview must be over by now. Surely the commissioner would have no alternative but to declare him a free man. I paced the house, exactly as Daniel had done so often these past days. I pulled back the net curtain, looked down Patchin Place, then let it fall again. Suddenly I could stand it no longer. I needed company, and I needed it now. Pleasant company, amusing company. And I knew exactly where that could be found.
I crossed the street and knocked on the door of the house on the other side of the alleyway. It was opened by an alarming vision with a deathly white face and two green circles where eyes should have been. I gasped as the vision removed one of the green circles.
“Sorry about that,” she said. “Cucumber. We’re trying out skin remedies. Sid just read an article in Ladies’ Home Journal on the subject of natural health and beauty from the larder.”
The white-faced ghost now revealed itself as my dear friend and neighbor, Augusta Mary Walcott, of the Boston Walcotts, but more usually known by her nickname, Gus.
“Ladies’ Home Journal?” I had to chuckle. “You two are the last creatures on earth I would have suspected of reading ladies’ magazines.”
“The cover promised interesting tips for decorating the home in the Japanese style, which we were thinking of doing anyway, so we bought the magazine and there was this delicious article on health and beauty, so of course we had to try it for ourselves. Come on in, you’re just in time to try our complexion paste.” She ushered me in and set off ahead of me down the hall and into their kitchen. “It’s egg whites boiled in rose water with alum and oil of sweet almonds, and a dash of honey, all whipped together into a paste, and then left to dry,” she called over her shoulder. “I must say, it feels very strange as it hardens, but you can actually sense all the impurities being drawn from the body.”
Sid and Gus had added a conservatory onto the back of their kitchen and the doors between the two were open, as were the doors to the little garden beyond, giving the place a delightfully rural feel. As we approached I could see another white-faced specter lying under a white sheet on a garden chair, looking horribly like a corpse until she started fanning herself furiously.
“These damn flies,” she muttered. “I suppose they are attracted to egg white, but they won’t leave me alone.”
“We have company, Sid darling,” Gus called. “Molly has come to share in our experiment.”
Elena Goldfarb, usually known as Sid, sat up and peeled the cucumber slices from her eyes. “I wanted to send Gus to fetch you, but she said you wouldn’t be able to desert Daniel the Deceiver.”
“He’s not around at the moment, saints be praised,” I said.
“That doesn’t sound like the voice of a woman in love.” Sid attempted to frown, but her mask would not let her.
“I know. It’s terrible of me. I should be delighted that he is gracing me with his constant presence, but frankly I’m not. His gloomy, moody behavior is driving me insane. I’ve come to the conclusion that I won’t make a very good wife.”
“I’m sure every person on this earth drives his or her partner insane from time to time,” Sid said. “I know we do. Now tie back your hair and let me slather some of this mixture onto your face. Madame Vestris is said to have preserved her beauty with this very concoction until late in life.”
I had no idea who Madame Vestris was. “Oh, I really don’t think—” I began.
“Don’t be a spoil sport, Molly.” Gus was already gathering back my unruly mop of hair. “Besides, it’s supposed to draw out impurities so you may be more saintly and forgiving the next time Daniel comes to call.”
I resigned myself to my fate, and was soon laughing with Sid and Gus as they turned me into a meringue. The laughter felt strange. How long since I had laughed and allowed myself to be silly with friends? The whole summer had been one of tension and heartbreak, to say nothing of the constant worry about money. Now I was recovered from my recent ordeal, both physically and mentally, but there were no new cases on the books for my small detective agency.
“So where is the dreadful Daniel this afternoon?” Sid asked. “Sit still, or the cucumber slices will fall off.”
“His new attorney has set up a meeting with the police commissioner and is asking to have all the charges against him dropped.”
“Well, that’s finally good news, isn’t it?” Gus said.
“I do hope so,” I said. “Daniel’s reputation means so much to him. His fellow officers still think he betrayed them, and I know how deeply that has affected him.”
“All’s well that ends well,” Sid said. “Daniel will be exonerated and go back to work, Molly can get on with her life, and peace will reign in Patchin Place.”
She was just finishing the sentence when there came a thunderous knocking on their front door. Gus hurried to open it. We heard an explosive, “What the deuce?”
“Beauty treatments.” We heard Gus’s calm voice. “And if you’re looking for Molly, she’s with us.”
I hastily removed the cucumber slices from my eyes in time to see Daniel striding down the hallway toward me.
“I went to your house and you weren’t there,” Daniel said petulantly.
“So being a great detective, you deduced she might be over here with us,” Sid said calmly. “Would you like a glass of ice tea, Captain Sullivan, or something stronger?”
“I’m not in the mood for socializing, I’m afraid,” Daniel said. “I’ve just had an infuriating meeting with the police commissioner.”
“He wouldn’t agree to drop all the charges?” I asked.
“No, he damned well wouldn’t.” He checked himself. “I apologize for the language, ladies, but my patience has been stretched to its limit this afternoon. Molly, would you please remove that ridiculous concoction from your face and let’s go home.”
I put my hand up to my cheek. “I think it needs to harden first or it will be impossible to remove,” I said. “But what was Mr. Partridge’s reason for not declaring you innocent on the spot?”
“Because that snake Quigley refuses to confess to anything. So until he is brought to trial and found guilty, I am still officially charged and will still have to stand trial myself.”
“But that’s ridiculous,” I said, rising from my garden chair with difficulty. “We have the proof that Quigley is guilty.”
“Of his part in the murders, yes, but there is nothing to prove that he orchestrated my meeting with the gang member; and I have, of course, admitted to my part in setting up the prize fight.”
“But they can’t punish you for that. Half the New York Police Department was present at that fight. I saw them with my own eyes.”
Daniel sighed. “I know none of it makes sense, but I have the feeling that Partridge wants to make an example of me. The only way that he’ll let me off is if I can get the gang member in question or Monk Eastman himself to come forward and categorically deny that I was working with them.”
“Then that’s what you should do,” I said.
Daniel gave a bitter chuckle. “Ask Monk Eastman to speak in my defense? I don’t think you understand the adversary, my dear. He would like nothing more than my downfall. He’ll not say a good word on my behalf nor let any of his gangsters.”
“He might, if I asked him for you,” I said.
“Under no circumstances, Molly. And that is an order.”
“You can’t order me around,” I said. “I’m not married to you; and even if I were, I’d not take commands like some dog.”
He laughed again. “I don’t doubt it for a second,” he said. “But I’d rather suffer the indignities of a trial than send you to plead with Monk Eastman on my behalf.”
“Then send Gentleman Jack to plead for you,” I said. “He must be in favor with Monk at the moment. I’m sure he made Monk a good deal of money by winning that prize fight.”
“I’m sure he did, but you’ve met him, Molly. The man is so addlepated that he’d forget his own name if people didn’t keep addressing him by it. What good could he do?”
“At least give him a try, Daniel,” I said. “Write a letter to Monk and send Jack in a hansom cab to deliver it in person. He could then add his appeal to the letter.”
“Molly, I can’t go on discussing this in these circumstances,” Daniel snapped. “Would you please do as I ask. Remove that ridiculous stuff—it makes you look like an iced cake—and let us continue this conversation in private. I hardly think it appropriate to discuss my current situation in front of those who aren’t concerned with it.”
“Oh, we are most concerned,” Gus said. “It affects us too. If you are unhappy, then Molly is unhappy, and if Molly is unhappy, then we cannot truly enjoy life ourselves. And since it is our aim and pledge to enjoy every moment, the sooner the situation is rectified, the better.”
“Hmmph,” was all that Daniel could say to that.
“Captain Sullivan, let us pour you a glass of brandy,” Gus said in her soothing voice. “I’m sure you have had the most vexing afternoon, and poor Molly was quite distressed when she came to visit. It’s not easy for her either, you know.”
“I’m sure it’s not,” Daniel said. He sighed again. “Very well. I accept your kind offer, simply because I refuse to walk across the street until Molly has removed that stuff from her face.”
“Replace the cucumber slices, Molly, or your eyes won’t feel the true benefit,” Gus directed as she disappeared into the drawing room to find the decanter. Feeling stupidly self-conscious with Daniel’s eyes on me, I replaced the slices, then thought better of it.
“I think you should stay for dinner over here, don’t you, Sid?” Gus said, returning with a generously full brandy snifter. “We could try something Japanese. I’ve been dying to do things with raw fish.”
“I really don’t think . . .” Daniel began when there was yet another knock at the front door.
“My, but we are popular this afternoon,” Sid said, attempting to rise.
“Perhaps I should answer it,” Daniel said. “You ladies present a most alarming appearance.”
Almost instantly we heard a man’s voice saying in theatrical tones, “What a disappointment. I was expecting to see two lovely ladies. Don’t tell me they’ve hired a butler?”
“The lovely ladies you refer to are unable to receive visitors at this moment,” Daniel said. “And I am not the butler.”
“Unable? Don’t tell me they have succumbed to the horrible grippe that is felling everyone. Oh God, tell me it’s not bad news. You’re not the doctor, are you?”
“No, I’m not, and may I ask who you are so that I can convey a message?”
“Moi? I thought everyone knew me. Tell them that Ryan is pining for them and has to see them immediately. You wouldn’t happen to know where the divine Miss Molly is, would you? She’s the one I am especially seeking tonight.”
“Miss Molly is with the other ladies at the back of the house, but they are in no condition—”
Before he could utter another word there was the sound of some kind of scuffle or commotion, a yell from Daniel, and wicked Irish playwright Ryan O’Hare came flying down the hallway toward us. He was wearing a white peasant shirt and a royal blue cape, and I must say he made a most dramatic entrance.
He stopped short when he saw us then gave a delighted gasp. “It’s the complexion paste from Ladies’ Home Journal. What fun. I’m dying to try it.”
“We used up the last on Molly,” Sid said.
“Molly, my angel, is that you under there? Yes, it is. I’d know that delicate white hand anywhere. Let me give it a kiss.”
“I’m sorry about this, ladies,” Daniel said in a tight voice. “I presume you know this gentleman?”
“Oh dear. You two gentlemen obviously haven’t been introduced. Ryan O’Hare, playwright extraordinaire. Captain Daniel Sullivan of the New York police.”
“Not Daniel the Deceiver?” Ryan exclaimed. “We meet at last. I have heard much about you. We’re all so proud that our dear Molly managed to rescue you from prison.”
“Well, actually I’m only out on bail,” Daniel said dryly. “Of course I’m grateful for what Molly tried to do.”
Then it hit me. He didn’t know the truth. I had never managed to speak of that night on Coney Island, so he didn’t know what I’d been through. And would never know, I decided. That chapter of my life was firmly sealed.
“I think the paste has hardened enough,” Sid said, and began to peel it off. We followed suit. Ryan danced between us, stroking our cheeks. “Wonderful,” he exclaimed, “deliciously soft, like a baby’s bottom.”
“Really, Ryan, you’ll go too far one day,” Gus scolded. “You know you only do it to shock.”
“One just wants to have one’s little fun,” Ryan said, pouting.
“Molly, can we please leave now?” Daniel came over to me and took my arm.
“You haven’t drunk your brandy,” Sid pointed out.
“Thank you, but in the circumstances—” Daniel said.
“You can’t possibly take Molly away. I forbid it,” Ryan said. “It was to seek her out that I trudged all this way through the heat and the flies and the dust.” Ryan took hold of my other arm. “I’m whisking you away, Molly dearest. I’ve been instructed to escort you to a party tonight. Someone is dying to meet you.”
I glanced at Daniel. His face was like granite.
“I’m afraid that I can’t go to a party tonight, Ryan,” I said, then my curiosity got the better of me. “Who is dying to meet me?”
“None other than Tommy Burke.”
“I’m afraid I don’t know Tommy Burke,” I said.
“Never heard of Tommy Burke?” Ryan sounded shocked. “My dear girl, he is only the leading theatrical impresario in the city. If Tommy Burke puts on a play, it is always a sensation. Did you not see his version of Uncle Tom’s Cabin? Not a dry eye in the house. But that’s beside the point. Tommy Burke is hosting a fabulous party tonight at the roof cabaret at Madison Square. Now tell me you can’t resist that, can you?”
“My, that does sound glamorous,” Sid said. “But you’re only inviting Molly so we understand. Gus and I are mortally wounded that we’re not to be included.”
“Of course you two are included. Our bold police captain too, if he so wishes,” Ryan said. “It just happened that Tommy Burke expressed a desire to meet Molly.”
“Why?” I asked. “How could he have heard of me?”
“I can’t exactly say. Something to do with your detective work, I understand. Anyway, all will be made clear tonight at the roof garden cabaret of Madison Square Garden, while sipping the most delightful champagne. I’ll return to escort you at eight. Wear something devastating.” He glanced at the clock on the kitchen wall. “Horrors. Is that the time? I’m late for my fitting. Must fly.”
And he was gone. 
Copyright © 2007 by Rhys Bowen. All rights reserved. 

Continues...

Excerpted from In Dublin's Fair City by Bowen, Rhys Copyright © 2008 by Bowen, Rhys. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 27 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 27 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 14, 2009

    Rhys Bowen

    Rhys Bowen has done another fine job with Molly. I love these sequels of hers. Molly is like an angel with trouble following behind her. Great read!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    If you are a mystery fan and love strong female characters check out the latest in the Molly Murphy Mystery series, In Dublin's Fair City.

    I am such a fan of the Molly Murphy Mystery book series!! I found the series about a year ago and I can never wait until a new title is released.
    Rhys Bowen is a great character writer. You can totally imagine not only what the character looks like but you visualize their surroundings so vividly. You really feel you can see what old New York looked like way back when.
    This series is about a young, strong and anything but traditonal Irish female who needs to escape Ireland and ends up becoming a private investigator. My favorite thing about her character is she never falls into the role most women of this time had to take. She is very opinionated and often speaks her mind which usually leads to trouble! You really need to read the first book, Murphys Law, to gain the full background. Each book takes you on an adventure of twists and turns and along the way provides actual historical events. The characters are vivid and Mrs. Bowen is not affaid to speak the unspeakable for the time period of which the books are based.
    This current book, In Dublins Fair City, is no exception. Miss Murphy has taken on a case which leads her back to Ireland, which she has not visited since escaping. Facing her fears, she packs her bags and heads over seas. You don't have to wait long before the mystery begins. New characters emerge, more twists occur and some heart felt moments that actually left me in tears.
    If you are a mystery lover and also love old world and strong characters, I encourage you to read any one of Rhys Bowens books.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    great historical mystery

    In 1903 New York¿s leading theatrical impresario Tommy Burke invites private detective Molly Burke to attend his bash at the roof cabaret of Madison Square. Molly is surprised because he is famous and they have never met before. Curious she goes to the party where he explains he wants to hire her. The next day at the Casino Theatre he tells her that he has recently learned upon the death of his mother that when his family fled Ireland during a famine fifty years ago, they left behind his ailing baby sister Mary Ann, whom he never knew existed. If she is alive, she will inherit his fortune instead of his always in trouble nephew Harvey (progeny of his other late sister). Though she may still be a criminal in Ireland, Molly welcomes the chance to go home. She sails on the Majestic along with actress Oona Sheehan, who she just met via Tommy. Oona convinces Molly to change cabins so when the actress¿ maid is murdered the police suspect the sleuth especially since Oona never sailed. As Molly seeks a killer as well as the sister, she searches Oona's trunks for clues only to find them loaded with rifles bound for a Free Ireland movement. As Molly becomes involved with the freedom fighters, someone else searches for Mary Ann to insure she does not inherit. This is a great historical mystery series starring a wonderful heroine who in this adventure goes home to learn that in many ways you can¿t go home again because nothing is quite the same. The story line is filled with action, a strong cast, and an incredible sense of time and location that are prime reasons the Molly Murphy mysteries are consistently some of the sub-genre¿s best. IN DUBLIN¿S FAIR CITY Rhys Bowen provides her usual entertaining enjoyable MURPHY'S LAW. Harriet Klausner

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 4, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    suspenseful

    Lots of turns and clues to drive the story forward and as always a very enjoyable adventure.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2012

    Was great, just not as great as the others...

    I love the whole series. I found that this one dragged once the mercenary/army was introduced. I found the situation with Oona Sheehan and the trunk filled with weapons to be really weird. I liked how the story with the sister turned out. This one didn't have the feel-good moments that the other ones have.

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  • Posted March 3, 2012

    Highly Recommended

    I love the Molly Murphy series. If you're looking for a great mystery with a little humor, I highly recommend all of the Molly Murphy books. Rhys Bowen does an excellent job and I'm looking forward to reading her other series as well.

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  • Posted June 29, 2009

    Good read

    Rhys Bowen has a winner with her Molly Murphy series.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 15, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Good Read for Fans of Series

    I like this series. I like Molly's spunk and love the side characters. If I hadn't read the previous stories, though, I don't think I would have liked this much. The plot was a stretch. I haven't read the next book yet and will be interested in how the handle what should be some relatively serious fallout from some of the things that happened in Dublin.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2007

    GOOD GOLLY, MOLLY HAS DONE IT AGAIN !!

    This is the sixth and latest book in the series and it just keeps getting better. I love Molly and I love the time period in which this takes place. Read them all, it doesn't matter if you read them in order, you'll love every one. You might also try Rhys Bowen's 'Evan Evans' mysteries...which is another great series.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2007

    Wonderful

    This is a terrific book, best in the series. One question, though. Isn't Dublin on the Irish Sea, not the North Sea?

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