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In Hitler's Shadow: An Israeli's Amazing Journey inside Germany's Neo-Nazi Movement
     

In Hitler's Shadow: An Israeli's Amazing Journey inside Germany's Neo-Nazi Movement

by Yaron Svoray, Simon Wiesenthal (Introduction), Nick Taylor
 
Since re-unification, disturbing headlines have poured out of an unstable Germany: Violent attacks by neo-Nazi skinheads against foreigners, including members of the U.S. National luge team and the rise of militant far-right nationalism have caught the attention of the world--and provoked only seething indifference from the German government. Now, in an

Overview

Since re-unification, disturbing headlines have poured out of an unstable Germany: Violent attacks by neo-Nazi skinheads against foreigners, including members of the U.S. National luge team and the rise of militant far-right nationalism have caught the attention of the world--and provoked only seething indifference from the German government. Now, in an extraordinary personal report, an eyewitness goes behind the headlines to penetrate the dark heart of Germany's neo-Nazi movement. Yaron Svoray, an Israeli journalist, was pursuing unrelated story when he literally stumbled on a cadre of neo-Nazis; soon, backed by the Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles, he used the cover of a fictitious American right-wing organization to infiltrate the movement--whose members never discovered Svoray's true identity. What he saw--and documented with hidden cameras and microphones--was a highly organized group whose connections spread across social strata and included "respectable" German politicians as well as wealthy patrons (in Germany and the U.S.), all of whom are unrepentant about Germany's past and wish to put Nazism in its future. In Hitler's Shadow is not an alarmist tract but a powerful expose of the clear and present danger posed by Germany's radical right. Not only does this a amazing story--which will be an original HBO feature early 1995--give meaning to today's news, it has already made news and will continue to do so throughout publication.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Israeli journalist and ex-detective Svoray pulled off a stunning investigative coup by penetrating Germany's neo-Nazi movement in 1992-93, and this extraordinary report, coauthored by Taylor (Sins of the Father), makes urgent reading. Posing first as an Austrian journalist, and later as a neo-Nazi sympathizer promising to funnel U.S. funds to German ultra-rightists, Svoray met several of Germany's leading neo-Nazis and toured a clandestine skinhead training camp. With assistance from the Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles, he exposed close links among various German neo-Nazi groups, as well as their ties to U.S. and European neo-fascists. Svoray documented many of his encounters using hidden cameras and microphones, and this chilling expos is the basis for an HBO feature to air in 1995. His mission, unveiled to news media in mid-1993, forced the German government to acknowledge the threat posed by anti-Semitic, racist, hate-mongering neo-Nazi groups. Author tour. (Oct.)
Library Journal
Journalist Svoray, who served in the Israeli Army and on the Tel Aviv detective force, describes himself as "a large man with a natural sense of self-confidence, a gift for talk, and a curiosity that sometimes outweighed prudence." Still, it must have take extraordinary courage for Svoray, the son of Jews who had fled Hitler's Europe, to infiltrate Germany's neo-Nazi movement and detail their political intentions. Svoray stumbled upon his initial neo-Nazi contact by accident. Backed by the Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles, he posed as a right-wing Australian journalist living in the United States who had the contacts to help fund the movement. Using the third person, he here recounts his experiences in colorful, you-are-there prose that brings home just how sleazy as well as frightening these fanatics are. Some readers might initially find the cloak-and-dagger tone a little offputting, but Svoray ultimately delivers a solid, highly readable account of an organized group that Germany has been trying to write off as a few malcontents.-Barbara Hoffert, "Library Journal"
Aaron Cohen
Israeli Svoray's account of his encounters with neo-Nazis in today's Germany is one of the most astonishing, frightening stories yet about contemporary hate groups. While searching for diamonds in Europe, Svoray found a few skinheads and organized neo-Nazis who did not know or learn his nationality. Later he obtained U.S. Jewish organizational funding to return to Germany to investigate further. Gradually, as he convinced them he was an American sympathizer, Svoray got further inside those groups. He witnessed their violence (too closely in one case), and he observed how some new fascists are starting to pass as respectable politicians. Surprisingly, one of their most virulent leaders became very affectionate toward him. Much of this book is cloak-and-dagger intrigue and succeeds on that level. Its scariest aspect is that it shows that seemingly quiet citizens and official policies do not contradict the thugs' rhetoric; the line between Germany's tightening of refugee asylum provisions and skinhead attacks on immigrants is not clear, Svoray says. Did he need to risk his life to learn that?

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780385472845
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
09/01/1994
Edition description:
1st ed
Pages:
275

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