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In My Place
     

In My Place

5.0 1
by Hunter-Gault
 

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The award-winning correspondent for the MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour gives a moment-by-moment account of her walk into history when, as a 19-year-old, she challenged Southern law--and Southern violence--to become the first black woman to attend the University of Georgia. A powrful act of witness to the brutal realities of segregation.

Overview

The award-winning correspondent for the MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour gives a moment-by-moment account of her walk into history when, as a 19-year-old, she challenged Southern law--and Southern violence--to become the first black woman to attend the University of Georgia. A powrful act of witness to the brutal realities of segregation.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In this warmhearted, well-observed memoir, the national correspondent for the MacNeil-LehrerNewsHour reflects on her childhood and young adulthood, including her historic role as one of two black students who desegregated the University of Georgia in 196 1. Dwelling a bit too much on her family history and descriptions of the southern towns where she grew up, Hunter-Gault identifies many of the forces that shaped her: strong teachers, good friends and a dignified father struggling as a chaplain in a racist Army. After attending a largely white school in Alaska, she spent her high school years in the supportive black environment of L.A.-Lovely Atlanta. She downplays her heroism at the University of Georgia in order to highlight the heady but humbling feelings she derived from other blacks' pride in her. She tells of harassment and support in those dramatic years, as well as of her growth as a journalist, her public speaking tours and even her romance with a white Southerner. She concludes, a bit awkwardly, with the commencement address she delivered at her alma mater in 1988; this work hints, however, that Hunter-Gault could write a rich sequel. (Nov.)
School Library Journal
YA-- A vivid feeling of place and immediacy pervades this moving memoir of the first black woman to graduate from the University of Georgia. It is the story of growing up in Alaska on a military base and in small towns in Georgia during the stable 1950s and coming-of-age during the turbulent 1960s. Taught by her father, a military chaplain, that she deserved the best, and loved unconditionally by her mother and extended family, Hunter-Gault shows how she was emotionally equipped to face loneliness, ostracism, and even violence for the cause of civil rights. Her story is about the universal adolescent search for one's place in the family, among one's peers, in the community, and eventually in the world. It is also a compelling documentation of the ugly turmoil of the times. An inspiring historical journey.-- Jackie Gropman, Richard Byrd Library, Springfield, VA
Mary Carroll
After nearly 30 years in journalism, Hunter-Gault is finally prepared to write about her early encounter with history: in January 1961, Hunter-Gault and her high school friend Hamilton Holmes were the University of Georgia's first African American students. Defining her "place" was an essential task for Hunter-Gault. Her father, a proud, stiff-necked U.S. Army chaplain, lived apart from his family much of the time; in his absence, her mother and grandmother formed a warm, supportive household. Still, her time away from Georgia--South Carolina and New York City summers with relatives, and eighth grade in Alaska (although her parents were reunited, she was her school's only black student)--made Hunter-Gault a bit of an army brat. Journalistic hopes led her to participate in the University of Georgia suit; no other state school had a journalism major. When Judge Bootle ordered the registrar to enroll the plaintiffs, white students reacted violently, but Hunter-Gault and Holmes persisted. Some 25 years after their 1963 graduation, Hunter-Gault was a commencement speaker, while orthopedic surgeon Holmes was on the university's Board of Advisors. Eloquent family tribute as well as intimate social history, "In My Place" is a useful addition to civil rights movement collections.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780374175634
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Publication date:
11/01/1992
Edition description:
1st ed
Pages:
257
Product dimensions:
6.33(w) x 9.33(h) x 0.98(d)

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In My Place 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Hunter-Gault's story is inspiring to all women who must transcend the prejudice and stereotyping imposed upon us by a society that has yet to learn to appreciate diversity. African, Asian, Hispanic, Caucasian, and Native-American women - all have made unique and indelible contributions to women's history and to the rich cultural diversity of our country. We should celebrate them in our schools and in our hearts