In Search of Self in India and Japan: Toward a Cross-Cultural Psychology

Hardcover (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $1.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 96%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (17) from $1.99   
  • New (2) from $24.90   
  • Used (15) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$24.90
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(171)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
New NEW copy! Ships out within 24 hours! 4-D30.

Ships from: Kenosha, WI

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$60.00
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(213)

Condition: New

Ships from: Chicago, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview

Drawing on work with Indian and Japanese patients, a prominent American psychoanalyst explores inner worlds that are markedly different from the Western psyche. A series of fascinating case studies illustrates Alan Roland's argument: the "familial self," rooted in the subtle emotional hierarchical relationships of the family and group, predominates in Indian and Japanese psyches and contrasts strongly with the Western "individualized self." In perceptive and sympathetic terms Roland describes the emotional problems that occur when Indians and Japanese encounter Western culture and the resulting successful integration of new patterns that he calls the "expanding self." Of particular interest are descriptions of the special problems of women in changing society and of the paradoxical relationship of the "spiritual self" of Indians and Japanese to the "familial self."

Also described is Roland's own response to the broadening of his emotional and intellectual horizons as he talked to patients and supervised therapists in India and Japan. "As we were coming in for a landing to Bombay," he writes, "the plane banked so sharply that when I supposedly looked down all I could see were the stars, while if I looked up, there were the lights of the city." This is the "world turned upside down" that he describes so eloquently in this book. What he has learned will fascinate those who wish to deepen their understanding of a different way of being.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"While Western psychology assumes that human nature is the same everywhere, there are profound psychological differences from culture to culture, according to a growing body of evidence . . . . One of the most extensive criticisms of Western psychology has been made by Dr. Roland in [this] book."The New York Times

"Roland compares the extended familial-self typical of Indian and Japanese experience with the individualized self-concept of America.... This book adds crucial psychological dimensions to our study of Eastern philosophy and religion. It catches the vital nuances of self-experience that escape philosophical and historical approaches."—Harold Coward, Hindu-Christian Studies Bulletin

"This book addresses a fundamental question—the universality of human nature.... Drawing upon work with patients and therapists in both India and Japan, [Roland] describes the profound differences between the Western individualized self and the familial self so central to Asian culture.... Of particular value is Roland's sensitive treatment of the evolving identity of women in the two cultures, as well as his exploration of the deeply significant spiritual self, a topic that is largely neglected in Western theory and practice."Choice

Hindu-Christian Studies Bulletin
Roland compares the extended familial-self typical of Indian and Japanese experience with the individualized self-concept of America.... This book adds crucial psychological dimensions to our study of Eastern philosophy and religion. It catches the vital nuances of self-experience that escape philosophical and historical approaches.
— Harold Coward
Choice
This book addresses a fundamental question—the universality of human nature.... Drawing upon work with patients and therapists in both India and Japan, [Roland] describes the profound differences between the Western individualized self and the familial self so central to Asian culture.... Of particular value is Roland's sensitive treatment of the evolving identity of women in the two cultures, as well as his exploration of the deeply significant spiritual self, a topic that is largely neglected in Western theory and practice.
The New York Times
While Western psychology assumes that human nature is the same everywhere, there are profound psychological differences from culture to culture, according to a growing body of evidence . . . . One of the most extensive criticisms of Western psychology has been made by Dr. Roland in [this] book.
Hindu-Christian Studies Bulletin - Harold Coward
Roland compares the extended familial-self typical of Indian and Japanese experience with the individualized self-concept of America.... This book adds crucial psychological dimensions to our study of Eastern philosophy and religion. It catches the vital nuances of self-experience that escape philosophical and historical approaches.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691086170
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 10/28/1988
  • Pages: 424
  • Product dimensions: 6.47 (w) x 9.57 (h) x 1.27 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface ix
1 Introduction: The Familial Self, the Individualized Self, and the Spiritual Self 3
Part 1 The Indian and Japanese Self and Social Change
2 Indian Identity and Colonialism 17
3 Psychoanalysis in India and Japan 55
4 The Familial Self, Individualization, and the Modernization Process 89
5 The Dynamics of Change in Urban Indian and Japanese Women 146
6 The Indian Self: Reflections in the Mirror of the American Life Style 195
Part 2 The Indian and Japanese Self: Theoretical Perspectives
7 The Indian Familial Self in Its Social and Cultural Contexts 209
8 The Indian and Japanese Familial Self 242
9 The Spiritual Self: Continuity and Counterpoint to the Familial Self 289
10 Conclusions: Psychoanalysis in Civilizational Perspective 312
Glossary 335
References 349
Index 369
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)