In Search of Stupidity: Over Twenty Years of High Tech Marketing Disasters

Overview

In Search of Stupidity: Over Twenty Years of High-Tech Marketing Disasters, Second Edition is National Lampoon meets Peter Drucker. It's a funny and well-written business book that takes a look at some of the most influential marketing and business philosophies of the last twenty years. Through the dark glass of hindsight, it provides an educational and entertaining look at why these philosophies didn?t work for many of the country's largest and best-known high-tech companies.

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Overview

In Search of Stupidity: Over Twenty Years of High-Tech Marketing Disasters, Second Edition is National Lampoon meets Peter Drucker. It's a funny and well-written business book that takes a look at some of the most influential marketing and business philosophies of the last twenty years. Through the dark glass of hindsight, it provides an educational and entertaining look at why these philosophies didn’t work for many of the country's largest and best-known high-tech companies.

Marketing wizard Richard Chapman takes you on a hilarious ride in this book, which is richly illustrated with cartoons and reproductions of many of the actual campaigns used at the time. Filled with personal anecdotes spanning Chapman's remarkable career (he was present at many now-famous meetings and events), In Search of Stupidity, Second Edition examines the best of the worst marketing ideas and business decisions in the last 20 years of the technology industry.

This second edition includes new chapters on Google and on how to avoid stupidity, plus the extensive analyses of all chapters from the first edition. You’ll want to get a copy because it:

  • Features an interesting preface and interview with Joel Spolsky of "Joel on Software"
  • Offers practical advice on avoiding PR disaster
  • Features actual pictures of some of the worst PR and marketing material ever created
  • Is highly readable and funny
  • Includes theme-based cartoons for every chapter
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Editorial Reviews

From The Critics
Slashdot.org
An excellent source of information, analysis and good laughs. It's one of the few industry titles that will give you a large supply of stories to re-tell to other developers over a beer. Chapman's book is also an excellent case study collection of anti-management rules that one should avoid when running a high tech company.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781590597217
  • Publisher: Apress
  • Publication date: 9/26/2006
  • Edition description: 2ND
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 408
  • Product dimensions: 9.00 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 0.84 (d)

Meet the Author

Merrill R. (Rick) Chapman is the author of the first edition of In Search of Stupidity. He has worked in the software industry since 1978 as a programmer, salesman, support representative, senior marketing manager, and consultant for many different companies, including WordStar (really MicroPro, but no one remembers the name of the company), Ashton-Tate, IBM, Inso, Novell, Bentley Systems, Berlitz, Hewlett-Packard, and Ziff-Davis. His first computer was a Trash One (you antiques out there know what that is), and he began his career writing software inventory management systems for beer and soda distributors in New York City. He is the author of The Product Marketing Handbook for Software, coauthor of the Software Industry and Information Association's U.S. Software Channel Marketing and Distribution Guide, and periodically writes articles about software and high-tech marketing for a variety of publications.
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Table of Contents

Foreword
About the Artist
Acknowledgments
1 Introduction 1
2 First Movers, First Mistakes: IBM, Digital Research, Apple, and Microsoft 13
3 A Rather Nutty Tale: IBM and the PC Junior 33
4 Positioning Puzzlers: MicroPro and Microsoft 47
5 We Hate You, We Really Really Hate You: Ed Esber and Ashton-Tate 65
6 The Idiot Piper: OS/2 and IBM 79
7 Frenchman Eats Frog, Chokes to Death: Borland and Philippe Kahn 105
8 Brands for the Burning: Intel and Motorola 123
9 From Godzilla to Gecko: The Long, Slow Decline of Novell 145
10 Ripping PR Yarns: Microsoft and Netscape 163
11 Purple Haze All Through My Brain: The Internet and ASP Busts 193
Afterword: Stupid Development Tricks 223
Glossary of Terms 233
Selected Bibliography 241
Index 243
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