In the Absence of Alexander: Harpalus and the Failure of Macedonian Authority

Overview

When Alexander the Great's treasurer fled to Athens in 324 BC, three separate Macedonian embassies failed to secure his return. Blackwell's explanation of this event traces the history of Macedonian rule in Greece from 335 BC until the death of Alexander. This study probes political realities behind titles and treaties, and complex interactions among individuals, states, and institutions. In the Absence of Alexander describes a "Macedonian Hegemony" that held power without commanding authority, an empire that ...
See more details below
This Hardcover is Not Available through BN.com
Sending request ...

Overview

When Alexander the Great's treasurer fled to Athens in 324 BC, three separate Macedonian embassies failed to secure his return. Blackwell's explanation of this event traces the history of Macedonian rule in Greece from 335 BC until the death of Alexander. This study probes political realities behind titles and treaties, and complex interactions among individuals, states, and institutions. In the Absence of Alexander describes a "Macedonian Hegemony" that held power without commanding authority, an empire that could not have hoped to survive the death of its king.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Kent Rigsby
"Blackwell offers a meticulous study of the Harpalus affair in order to analyze the limits of the Macedonians' ability to control Greece. He shows that in the continuing absence of Alexander in the East, those who claimed to speak for the king had increasing difficulty in exercising authority, in part because of their competition with one another. The book is an important answer both to historians who see a constitution in the Macedonian state and to those who think that the state was merely a projection of Alexander's `power.' On Blackwell's showing, Athens in the Harpalus affair exposed both Macedonian authority and Macedonian power as fluid, subject to interpretation, and finally ineffective."

-- Professor of Classical Studies, Duke University

Thomas R. Martin
"This perceptive scholarly study reveals the hollowness of Macedonian authority in Greece caused by Alexander's prolonged absence in Asia. Christopher Blackwell expertly analyzes the sources to show that Athens in 324 BC could operate as an independent agent in international politics and that Macedonian dominance in Greece was very far from a sure thing at that date. This book makes a significant contribution to Greek history, not least because it points to the contingency of the coming Macedonian victory that would initiate the Hellenistic period."

-- Professor of Classics, The College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, Massachusetts
Booknews
Elucidates the complex relations between Macedonians and Greeks while Alexander was off campaigning in Asia by analyzing the case of his treasurer running off to Athens in 324 BC and the inability of the imperial authorities minding the store to secure his return. Blackwell includes translations of the Greek and Roman quotations for the benefit of non-specialist readers, but warns that his account assumes a basic knowledge of events during the period. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780820439877
  • Publisher: Lang, Peter Publishing, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 1/1/1999
  • Series: Classical Studies Series
  • Pages: 185

Table of Contents

Preface
Introduction to the Crisis 11
Background to Harpalus' Flight 11
Harpalus' Flight, Arrest, and Escape 13
The Macedonian Embassies 17
The Embassies and the Crisis 27
Antipater in Macedonia 33
The Common Peace 38
Antipater and Agis 53
Antipater's Army and Alexander's Needs 65
Megalopolis and After 69
Conclusions 77
Olympias' Position 83
Olympias' Actions 89
Olympias' Move to Epirus 94
Olympias and Antipater 102
Olympias: 330 to 324 109
Antipater and the Greeks: 330 to 325 110
Alexander's Return 117
Conclusions 130
The Harpalus Affair: Summary of Events 134
The Harpalus Affair: Three Embassies 136
The Harpalus Affair: the Debate and Decision at Athens 140
After Harpalus: the Promulgation of the Exiles Decree 145
Alexander's Divinity 151
Antipater, Craterus, and the End of Hegemony 155
Conclusion 159
Bibliography 161
General Index 169
Index Locorum 179
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)