In the Dark Places (Inspector Alan Banks Series #22)

In the Dark Places (Inspector Alan Banks Series #22)

4.0 4
by Peter Robinson
     
 

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Published in the United Kingdom and Canada as Abattoir Blues

Detective Chief Inspector Alan Banks is back in this crackling novel of suspense, a moody and sophisticated mystery full of serpentine curves from New York Times bestselling, Edgar Award-winning author Peter Robinson.

One of the world’s greatest suspense writers returns

Overview

Published in the United Kingdom and Canada as Abattoir Blues

Detective Chief Inspector Alan Banks is back in this crackling novel of suspense, a moody and sophisticated mystery full of serpentine curves from New York Times bestselling, Edgar Award-winning author Peter Robinson.

One of the world’s greatest suspense writers returns with this sensational new novel featuring Inspector Alan Banks, hailed by Michael Connelly as “a man for all seasons.”

It’s a double mystery: Two young men have vanished, and the investigation leads to two troubling clues in two different locations—a scorched van and a peculiar bloodstain in an abandoned airport hangar.

As Banks and his team scramble for answers, the inquiry takes an even darker turn when a truck careens off an icy road in a freak hailstorm. In the wreckage, rescuers find the driver, who was killed on impact, as well as another body—a body that was dead well before the crash.

Snow falls. The body count rises. And Banks, perceptive and curious as ever, feels himself being drawn deeper into a web of crime, and at its center something—or someone—dark and dangerous lying in wait.

Vibrating with tension, ingeniously plotted, and filled with soul and poignancy, In the Dark Places is a remarkable achievement from this masterful talent.

Editorial Reviews

Louise Penny
“Brilliantly plotted, beautifully paced, it gathers speed and dread until I could barely stand it. Peter Robinson writes with compassion, with depth, with the assurance of a writer at the top of his game.”
Michael Connelly
Praise for Peter Robinson’s In the Dark Places: “Peter Robinson is an author with amazing empathy, a snare trap ear for dialogue and a clear eye for the telling detail.”
Tess Gerritsen
“Peter Robinson is a master, and In the Dark Places shows why. Thrilling, sophisticated, and emotionally involving, this is edge-of-your-seat, heart-in-your-throat suspense. A must-read.”
Publishers Weekly
06/22/2015
In bestseller Robinson’s deftly plotted 22nd Inspector Banks novel (after 2014’s Children of the Revolution), the Yorkshire copper investigates the disappearance of a tractor belonging to gentleman farmer John Beddoes. There’s no reason to connect the theft to the mysterious bloodstain found at a nearby WWII-era airplane hangar, until Beddoes mentions his neighbor’s allegedly ne’er-do-well son, a young man named Michael Lane, who apparently runs with the wrong crowd. When Banks and Det. Insp. Annie Cabot look into Michael’s past, they find that he’s mates with Morgan Spencer, a known tough who soon turns up dead. Morgan’s murder leads the team to local abattoirs—scenes that vegetarian readers may want to skip—as Bank tries to tie all the disparate pieces together. Robinson is equally adept at making murder on a small scale as compelling as any serial killer hunt, and Banks continues to charm. Agent: Dominick Abel, Dominick Abel Literary Agency. (Aug.)
The Observer
“Classic Robinson: labyrinthine plot merged with deft characterisation.”
Independent
“It’s neither the setting nor even the characters that makes Robinson’s work so satisfying, but the plotting of Swiss-watch precision.”
Publisers Weekly on CHILDREN OF THE REVOLUTION
“Absorbing...Robinson excels at connecting his detectives’ personal stories to the investigation, endowing familiar characters with fresh nuance and depth. Impeccable pacing fleshes out Miller’s tragic life and unravles the killer’s motive.”
Library Journal
06/01/2015
DCI Alan Banks's team is miffed at having been sent to investigate a stolen tractor, albeit such an expensive one that the theft is considered a major crime. It's not easy to steal a piece of equipment that size, and the detectives believe that the theft may be tied to a major smuggling operation. Suspicion falls on a neighbor's troubled son, as the young man and a friend have disappeared. Robinson's latest mystery (after Children of the Revolution) finds the team investigating farmers and employees of the local slaughterhouse, offering the author an opportunity to provide abundant descriptions of the unsavory side of the meat industry. VERDICT The focus here is less on Banks and more on the no-nonsense DS Winsome Jackman, her background, and the possibility of a romance. The series remains absorbing, and procedural fans will be satisfied. Robinson's portrayal of the realities of slaughterhouses will, no doubt, inspire new commitments to vegetarianism. [See Prepub Alert, 2/23/15.]—Linda Oliver, MLIS, Colorado Springs
Kirkus Reviews
2015-04-30
A case no one in Eastvale HQ wants to work—a gentleman farmer's stolen tractor—leads to all the homicidal twists and turns beloved of Robinson's many fans. Returning from a holiday in Mexico, John and Patricia Beddoes find that someone's broken into their barn—child's play, really—and driven off a tractor worth £100,000. It may not sound like much to Eastvale CID, but Beddoes is worked up about it, and DI Annie Cabbot obligingly begins her inquiries with neighboring farmer Frank Lane, whose son, Michael, exactly the sort of tearaway Beddoes would suspect, has fortuitously vanished. So has his ne'er-do-well mate Morgan Spencer, who's soon linked to a killing in a disused airline hanger. Several pieces of the puzzle come together with a bang when an accident sends Caleb Ross' delivery van hurtling over a cliff and a search discloses the remains of Morgan Spencer, neatly chopped and bagged, among the parcels of dead animals headed for a meat-packing plant. Where did Spencer meet his end, at whose hand, and why? DCI Alan Banks, returning from his own holiday, is nominally in charge of the inquiry, but the mystery this time has so many strands and so many players, some of them quite memorable, that it requires the entire Eastvale team, with a particularly strong performance from DS Winsome Jackman, to chase down every complication. Too diffuse in both its crimes and its coppers to rank among Robinson's finest work (Children of the Revolution, 2014, etc.). But if malfeasance in Yorkshire is what you crave, you won't hesitate, and you won't go wrong.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780062240569
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
07/26/2016
Series:
Inspector Alan Banks Series , #22
Pages:
352
Sales rank:
103,879
Product dimensions:
5.31(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.82(d)

Meet the Author

One of the world’s most popular and acclaimed writers, Peter Robinson is the bestselling, award-winning author of the Inspector Banks series; he has also written two short-story collections and three standalone novels, which combined have sold more than ten million copies around the world. Among his many honors and prizes are the Edgar Award, the CWA (UK) Dagger in the Library Award, and Sweden’s Martin Beck Award.

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In the Dark Places (Inspector Alan Banks Series #22) 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Engaging all the way to the end. The back stories of Winsome and Annie only add to the enjoyment. Cleverly crafted. To Peter : best get cracking on your next.... I have the hardest time waiting for the next one!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
it was just too gorey. I've read all of Mr Robinson's books (I read a LOT) and always thought they were terrific, all 5 stars, but there was an awful lot of blood and guts in this one. Really like all of the "good guys" in this series, and the not so good and truly awful ones were at least interesting. This story had a lot of descriptions about what happens when people and animals were shot with a bolt gun.....not only gross but really sadistic...if a description can be called sadistic. I know I'll buy the next one regardless, but please not so vividly, well, VIVID!
gloriafeit 17 days ago
From the publisher: The 22nd book in the DCI Banks series, “In the Dark Places,” develops some of the best-loved characters in contemporary suspense fiction. A perfect mix of police procedural and psychological study, the novel begins with a simple of vehicle abduction. Two young men implicated in the theft have vanished, and the investigation leads to two troubling clues in two different locations - - a scorched van and a peculiar bloodstain in an abandoned WWII airport hanger. As Bank and his team scramble for answers, the inquiry takes an ever darker turn when a truck careens off an icy road in a freak hailstorm. Rescuers swiftly uncover both the driver, who was killed on impact, as well as another body . . . a body that was dead well before the crash. Snow falls. The body count rises. And Banks, perceptive and curious as ever, feels himself being drawn deeper into a web of crime, and at its center something – - or someone - – dark and dangerous lying in wait. This is indeed a wonderful police procedural, but so much more than just that. Annie says of Banks “They’d have to drag him kicking and screaming out of his office soon. Or would he get a newer, bigger office and an extra five years’ grace if he got promoted to superintendent, as Gervaise had promised last November?” Alongside Banks in Homicide and Major Crimes of the Eastvale Police are his regular colleagues: DI Annie Cabbot, DC Dougal (”Doug”) Wilson, AC (Area Commander) Gervais, DC Gerry Masterson, forensic bloodstain analyst Jasminder (“Jazz”) Singh, as well as DS Winsome Jackman, a bit over 6’ in stature and surely one of the most intriguing of the cops in this wonderful series, having grown up in rural Jamaica, the daughter of a local police corporal. Then there is DCS Richard (“Dirty Dick”) Burgess, who’d known Banks since their school days, who Banks says “had a habit of turning up when you least expected him - - which was, perhaps, when you should most expect him) . . . The thing about Burgess, Banks knew from experience, was that however crude and blokeish he was with the lads, he was still a handsome devil in his way, and he had the sort of manly charm that many women found attractive. Not exactly a bit of rough - - he was too sophisticated for that - - but world-weary with a hint of danger and definite dash of the bad boy.” Banks is of course the central protagonist, alone since his divorce and not seeing either his son or daughter as often as he would like, only recently involved with the beautiful Oriana, almost half his age and presently vacationing in Australia. The book opens with Banks returning early from a weekend holiday, and on that Monday morning is faced with the incident of the stolen tractor, only the first in a series of various thefts, threats and murders. Always distrustful of coincidences, he is convinced that they are all connected. The descriptions of the ensuing investigations are done in the author’s usual elegant style, as are his forays into the inner lives of his cohorts. And sexist as this may seem, I was surprised to read the following, written by a male author about two of the important characters in the book (and I mean that in the most praiseworthy way): “Banks could understand what [she] saw in [him]: perhaps someone she could change and forge a future with. Someone who might lack ambition and wealth but who would cherish her and treat her with kindness and love. Someone who would look after her and Ian. Wouldn
Karen-M 3 months ago
Okay. I am a fan of British mysteries and especially of four gentlemen known as Chief Inspector Barnaby, Superintendent Adam Dalgliesh, Inspector Endeavor Morse and Inspector Roderick Alleyn. So, when I am introduced to a new potential representative of the British form of law and order, I have to ask myself ‘do I need to add another Inspector to my list of favorites?’ Well, this time the answer is a definite yes, I do, Inspector Alan Banks. The only fault I find in this new British favorite of mine is that I have started at the end of this series instead of the beginning, which is my fault not Inspector Banks’ fault. He will be added to my wish-list beginning with the first book, of course because I am filled with questions of his past history which at times is hinted at in In the Dark Places/Abattoir Blues (guess they thought most Americans wouldn’t know what an Abattoir was). Now, putting all my personal rambling aside, I really enjoyed this mystery. Interesting characters, enough suspense to keep me reading, solid descriptions of the countryside which made it easy for me to picture the desolate and lonely area of the crime scenes and a different sort of premise for crime and murder, one that I have not come across before. Two young men vanish and a tractor is stolen. Two separate cases to be solved or is there a connection? An accident with a truck reveals what may have happened to one of the young men but where is the other? The Inspector, freshly back from vacation, returns to headquarters and to his team, who after working both cases, have come to the conclusion that there may be a connection. First rate mystery which was a pleasure to read. I see more of Inspector Banks and his team in my future.
Delphimo More than 1 year ago
I have read all the Inspector Banks novels and some fall short of a reader's expectations, and this falls in that category. Descriptive and graphic violence dominate the book, and that little hope in humanity barely seeps through the cracks. Of course, not every book can live up to a reader's criteria. Inspector Banks falls to the sidelines as his team races to find a devious killer. Alan spends much of the time thinking of past events and his relatives, and wondering about his new romance with a much younger woman. The story seems off balance and never hits a balance.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago