In the Footsteps of J.E.B. Stuart

In the Footsteps of J.E.B. Stuart

3.0 2
by Clint Johnson
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

How elusive was Confederate cavalry chief J. E. B. Stuart? Just ask Union general George McClellan, who suffered embarrassment when Stuart rode a circle around his entire army in June 1862. Or Union general John Pope, from whose headquarters tent Stuart brazenly stole a coat, a dispatch book, and half a million dollars.

This book will bring you closer to

Overview

How elusive was Confederate cavalry chief J. E. B. Stuart? Just ask Union general George McClellan, who suffered embarrassment when Stuart rode a circle around his entire army in June 1862. Or Union general John Pope, from whose headquarters tent Stuart brazenly stole a coat, a dispatch book, and half a million dollars.

This book will bring you closer to Stuart than the Federal army managed to get during most of the Civil War. You’ll visit his birthplace, the site of his fatal wounding, and the cemetery where he was buried. You’ll see the scenes of his military feats in the East, of course, but you’ll also travel to rural Kansas, where he was almost killed by a Cheyenne Indian in 1857, and to southwestern Texas, where he nearly ended up riding a camel instead of a horse.

For many, the flamboyant, daring Stuart—he of the thick beard, plumed hat, flowing cape, and galloping horse—remains a lasting symbol of the Confederacy. This book provides an intimate look at the man by introducing the places he knew throughout his life.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940016251974
Publisher:
Blair, John F. Publisher
Publication date:
02/08/2013
Series:
In the Footsteps , #3
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
174
File size:
7 MB

Meet the Author

Clint Johnson is a native Southerner whose Scots-Irish and Welsh ancestors first settled in North Carolina in the 1730s and 1760s. One of those ancestors owned more than 100 acres on Manhattan Island, New York in the early 1760s, which he leased to the island’s government for 99 years. When a grandson tried to reclaim the land for the family, those New York Yankees claimed their deed book had been lost in a fire and they would not honor the legitimate claim. As late as the 1920s, members of Clint’s family were trying to sue New York City for the return of their property. Clint counts Confederate soldiers from Florida, Georgia, and Alabama among his more recent ancestors.

He is a native of Fish Branch, Florida, an unmapped community of orange groves, cypress bayheads, cattle ranches, panthers, bobcats, alligators, and friendly neighbors. Fish Branch is what Florida was before Walt Disney World changed the state. He graduated from high school in Arcadia, Florida, the cow town whose wild and wooly residents inspired many of the cowboy paintings of Frederick Remington. He then graduated from the University of Florida with a degree in journalism.

Fascinated with The War for Southern Independence (Northern readers can call it The Civil War if you wish) since the fourth grade, Clint has written eight books on The War. One of his favorite projects was helping Clarence “Big House” Gaines, one of the nation’s best basketball coaches, write his autobiography. Clint has also written two corporate biographies, and hundreds of newspaper and magazine articles on business, history and travel.

Clint, his wife Barbara, their cats, dog, and horse live in the mountains of North Carolina near where the Overmountain Men gathered to go fight the Tories at Kings Mountain, South Carolina, in the American Revolution.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

In the Footsteps of J. E. B. Stuart 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The better book would be the sights missed. Nothing about the interpretation at Laurel Hill or the town of Stuart or the Stuart sites in Mount Airy. He gets the sight in Orange County where Stuart lost his hat totally wrong.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Mr. Broughton is not a very thorough reader. He apparently missed pages 84-86 of my book, In The Footsteps of J.E.B. Stuart, where Laurel Hill, the birthplace of J.E.B. Stuart is prominently mentioned, complete with phone number and web site (the only such site to get such favorable treatment). I intentionally gave Laurel Hill prominent mention in an effort to help the group that is preserving the ground- a group that was once headed by Mr. Broughton. The Orange County site where Stuart's hat was captured was pointed out to me by local historians. If I was misled by locals, I was misled, but I tend to trust the people who live in the area. Stuart, Va. was named in honor of the general, but has little, if any, connection to him that I know about. Mt. Airy, N.C. was supposedly the place where the Stuarts got their mail, but as JEB was off to school by the time he was 12, I doubt there is much to see there that would interest visitors who are more interested in him as an older person. Finally, these types of books are limited by the number of pages that can be printed so not every single spot can be mentioned. Mr. Broughton's is the first complaint I have ever received about any of the sites mentioned in my three book series: In The Footsteps of Robert E. Lee, Stonewall Jackson and J.E.B. Stuart. Buy or borrow the book and you be the judge if it guides you to sites associated with Stuart that interest you.