In the Picture: Get Looking! Get Thinking!

In the Picture: Get Looking! Get Thinking!

by Lucy Micklethwait
     
 

Here, in one big book, are 10 exciting, detailed paintings, each surrounded by 6 small, close-ups of something in the picture. Can you work out where each close-up belongs? Every spread carries a simple note about its picture, date and artist. And there are lots more activities at the end of the book to get you looking and thinking. The 10 paintings range fromf

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Overview

Here, in one big book, are 10 exciting, detailed paintings, each surrounded by 6 small, close-ups of something in the picture. Can you work out where each close-up belongs? Every spread carries a simple note about its picture, date and artist. And there are lots more activities at the end of the book to get you looking and thinking. The 10 paintings range fromf amiliar names such as Hieronymus Bosch and Jan Breughel the Elder to modern painters such as Marc Chagall and Georges Seurat, and also include a Moghul manuscript and trompe l'oeil painting, all chosen from the world's greatest art galleries

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Carlee Hallman
Through questions, games, and activities, young people are given a chance to look at ten paintings in depth. The book shows paintings from different ages, places, and media. Circles with a portion of the artwork are removed from the paintings and placed on the facing page for the reader to recognize and identify. The author asks questions about the paintings. For example, for the Bathers at Asnieres (1884) by George Seurat, she asks, "Is anybody talking?" and "Can you find the artist's signature?" In Tobias and the Angel (1470-80) by the Workshop of Andrea del Verrocchio, the activity is to draw or paint a picture of your guardian angel. In The Toy Shop (1962) by Peter Blake, we are told that the picture shows a real door and window full of collectables. The activity suggests cutting out magazine pictures of things you would like to sell, pasting them on cardboard, and using colored paper to create window panes and a frame. More parts of paintings are shown at the back with further questions such as "Can you name these creatures?' and "What shapes can you find in the details below?" Children will grow in their appreciation and enjoyment of different art forms through a course of discovery. Reviewer: Carlee Hallman
Kirkus Reviews
The age-old "I Spy" game continues to engage. Micklethwait (I Spy Colors in Art, 2007, etc.) builds on tried-and-true elements to provoke successful, quality interactions around art with these ten "specially chosen" images. She encourages readers to "[t]hink about what you see and how [the pictures] make you feel." After enjoying the cover, a detail from Seurat's accessible The Bathers at Asnières, readers find a series of ten two-page spreads, each of which include the total image, a brief description of the painting in question, some engaging facts about the artist, a few pointed questions and carefully chosen details for the readers'/viewers' delectation. The book ends with several pages that variously pique interest, ask questions or suggest art projects. Painters include Chagall, Breughel the Elder, Bosch, Collier, Verrocchio, Steen and more. Unfortunately, the paintings highlighted are so large and their image details so small that large group interactions with the book will be less than effective. Better for close sharing; children will probably enjoy multiple trips through it. (Informational picture book. 5-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781845076368
Publisher:
Frances Lincoln Children's Books
Publication date:
02/23/2010
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.60(w) x 11.90(h) x 0.30(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

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