In the Pines: Lost Poems: 1972-1997 by David St. John, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
In the Pines: Lost Poems: 1972-1997

In the Pines: Lost Poems: 1972-1997

by David St. John
     
 

Poetry. IN THE PINES first appeared as a limited edition chapbook, which is reprinted here along with uncollected work. Spanning twenty-five years in his career, the work reflects the progression of a major voice in American letters in poems that predate his highly influential HUSH and including those that follow the publication of his selected poems in 1994. From

Overview

Poetry. IN THE PINES first appeared as a limited edition chapbook, which is reprinted here along with uncollected work. Spanning twenty-five years in his career, the work reflects the progression of a major voice in American letters in poems that predate his highly influential HUSH and including those that follow the publication of his selected poems in 1994. From earlier poems that reflect the decadence of their times to recent work that embodies the present world, St. John's fresh imagery draws the reader into elegant poems that resonate with the mysteries of life. Goodbye, old friend, goodbye, goodbye .../ The only evidence is my heart. / I lived, they say, & then I died; so what? —/ In between, just a breath of scarlet smoke (After Esenin). David St. John's many awards include a Guggenheim Fellowhsip and three National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships in Poetry. He currently lives in Venice, California and teaches at the University of Southern California.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The melancholic wisdom of St. John's sixth collection seems hard-won: his is the post-lapsarian "solitary way" of love lost daily and sex cheapened by night. Confessionally breathless, the syntax of these poems seems not spontaneous but rather like an exhalation long suppressed. Lack of punctuation--especially in the volume's last quarter, where not a single period appears--and a fondness for the ampersand lend an open-ended, speculative air that at times can cross the line to inconclusiveness. A typical crux at which these poems arrive is expressed in "Red Wheat: Montana": "There is a kind of weeping so inconsolable/ It occasions only silence/ Just as there is a kind of silence so horrible it requires weeping." The 18 parts of "Nocturnes and Aubades" imitate the Strand of Dark Harbor in their tendency towards long-lined tercets and in the way that limousines, foreign friends, and glasses of red wine crop up without warning in landscapes lit by moon- and starlight. In "Memphis," St. John resurrects the King of Rock 'n Roll with kitschy spirituality as an Osiris in attendance "The first time we did anything loving/That really mattered & might still once again/In the ever hushed and distant Memphis of our dreams." The figure of the troubadour recurs; in "Music" he reveals that "It became my passion to explain everything/With music even the randomness of starlight or death." Deploying images that are sharp-edged (if bizarre) with the paratactic rush typical of his highly acclaimed work, St. John solidifies his growing reputation--Study for the World's Body: New and Selected Poems was a finalist for the National Book Award in 1994--and becomes, more than before, the wandering, soulful troubadour of whom he writes. (Mar.) FYI: In the Pines: Lost Poems 1972-1997, also due in March, presents St. John's previously uncollected work. (White Pine, $16 paper 176p ISBN 1-877727-90-3)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781877727900
Publisher:
White Pine Press
Publication date:
01/01/1999
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.50(d)

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