In the Presence of the Enemy (Inspector Lynley Series #8)

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Overview

Hailed as the "king of sleaze," tabloid editor Dennis Luxford is used to ferreting out the sins and scandals of people in exposed positions. But when he opens an innocuous-looking letter addressed to him at The Source, he discovers that someone else excels at ferreting out secrets as well.

Ten-year-old Charlotte Bowen has been abducted, and if Luxford does not admit publicly to having fathered her, she will die. But Charlotte's existence is Luxford's most fiercely guarded ...

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In the Presence of the Enemy (Inspector Lynley Series #8)

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Overview

Hailed as the "king of sleaze," tabloid editor Dennis Luxford is used to ferreting out the sins and scandals of people in exposed positions. But when he opens an innocuous-looking letter addressed to him at The Source, he discovers that someone else excels at ferreting out secrets as well.

Ten-year-old Charlotte Bowen has been abducted, and if Luxford does not admit publicly to having fathered her, she will die. But Charlotte's existence is Luxford's most fiercely guarded secret, and acknowledging her as his child will throw more than one life and career into chaos. Luxford knows that the story of Charlotte's paternity could make him a laughingstock and reveal to his beautiful wife and son the lie he's lived for a decade. Yet it's not only Luxford's reputation that's on the line: it's also the reputation—and career—of Charlotte Bowen's mother. For she is Undersecretary of State for the Home Office, one of the most high-profile Junior Ministers and quite possibly the next Margaret Thatcher.

Knowing that her political future hangs in the balance, Eve Bowen refuses to let Luxford damage her career by printing the story or calling the police. So the editor turns to forensic scientist Simon St. James for help. It's a case that fills St. James with disquiet, however, for none of the players in the drama seem to react the way one would expect.

Then tragedy occurs and New Scotland Yard becomes involved. Detective Inspector Thomas Lynley soon discovers that the case sends tentacles from London into the countryside, and he must simultaneously outfox death as he probes Charlotte Bowen's mysterious disappearance. Meanwhile, his partner Detective Sergeant Barbara Havers, working part of the investigation on her own and hoping to make the coup of her career, may be drawing closer to a grim solution—and to danger—than anyone knows.

In the Presence of the Enemy is a brilliantly insightful and haunting novel of ideals corrupted by self-interest, of the sins of parents visited upon children, and of the masks that hide people from each other—and from themselves.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Combining the eloquence of P.D. James with a story John Grisham would envy, George serves up a splendid, unsettling novel."—People

"Elizabeth George reigns as queen of the mystery genre....the Lynley books constitute the smartest, most gratifyingly complex and impassioned mystery series now being published."—Entertainment Weekly

"Rich...and addictively readable...elegant and unsettling, classy and caustic...a page-turner with unusual breadth and generous depth." —USA Today

"Elizabeth George only gets better...another superb British mystery."—Daily News, New York

"A masterpiece."—Winston-Salem Journal

"Tough, breathtaking."—Cosmopolitan

"A dazzler."—New Yorker

Cynthia Hacinli
The author brings back her familiar cast of London-based characters for another smart, literary crime novel. -- Bantam
Salon
Here's a suggestion: You may want to have a stash of Snickers bars on the night table before picking up Elizabeth George's latest British whodunit, In the Presence of the Enemy. This is the kind of smart, tantalizing novel that inspires late-night sugar runs. (It doesn't help that one of George's ne'er-do-well characters is a hardcore chocolate fiend who inhales Cadbury Whole Nut bars, Kit Kats and Aeros with abandon.) If you haven't read her, George herself is something of a treat. She's a fortysomething Californian who's been an anglophile since the age of 16 (when she first traveled to England), and she writes mysteries that are steeped in the lingo of London. In her new novel, George's core ensemble is back: Detective Inspector Thomas Lynley, of Scotland Yard; his partner Sergeant Barbara Havers; friends Simon and Deborah St. James; and his betrothed, Lady Helen Clyde. George cleverly picks up the threads and neuroses of each life, but at the heart of the book is a deftly-plotted tale spun around an emotionally stunted MP, her fanciful daughter who's been kidnapped, a macho Fleet Street editor, his ex-supermodel wife and a naive local constable. George may like old-fashioned mysteries, but this is very much a '90s novel, full of references to such subjects as the IRA, bulimia and AIDS. ("Safe sex was great," George writes at one point, "but she couldn't understand why its proponents never quite made the leap from coital protection to post-coital clean-up.")

George's mystery unfolds at a leisurely pace -- perhaps too leisurely for readers accustomed to John Grisham's work. Lynley doesn't really show up until page 205. And George may be waxing a tad cute for her own good; her earlier novels had a harder edge. But this is an author whose appeal has always been in the getting there, and she does so in a literate and literary fashion, offering players that can sometimes seem as infuriating and inscrutable as Jane Austen's. There is one murder; the stage is set for another. The truth becomes clear in 517 pages. Better make that a whole bag of snickers. --Cynitha Hacinli

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780553576085
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 5/28/1997
  • Series: Inspector Lynley Series , #8
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 656
  • Product dimensions: 4.17 (w) x 6.88 (h) x 1.07 (d)

Meet the Author

Elizabeth George
Elizabeth George’s first novel, A Great Deliverance, was honored with the Anthony and Agatha Best First Novel Awards and received the Grand Prix de Littérature Policière. Her third novel, Well-Schooled in Murder, was awarded the prestigious German prize for suspense fiction, the MIMI. A Suitable Vengeance, For the Sake of Elena, Missing Joseph, Playing for the Ashes, In the Presence of the Enemy, Deception on His Mind, In Pursuit of the Proper Sinner, A Traitor to Memory, and I, Richard were international bestsellers. Elizabeth George divides her time between Huntington Beach, California, and London. Her novels are currently being dramatized by the BBC.

From the Hardcover edition.

Biography

Elizabeth George was happy that her first novel was rejected.

Scratch that. She's happy now. At the time, it wasn't her best day. But the notes from her editor helped her realize that she had written the wrong book and chosen the wrong leading man. She threw out her Agatha-Christie/drawing-room-whodunit model in favor of a more modern police procedural set in the world of Scotland Yard. She promoted a minor character to her leading man, the handsome, aristocratic, Bentley-driving Thomas Lynley. And she invented a partner for him, the blue-collar, foul-mouthed, messy Barbara Havers.

"I was very lucky when the first one was rejected, because the editor explained to me why," George told the Los Angeles Times in 1999. "I had written a very Agatha Christie-esque book and she said that wasn't the way it was done. The modern crime novel doesn't have the detective call everyone into the library. It must deal with more topical crimes and the motives must be more psychological because the things you kill for are different now. Things like getting rid of a spouse who won't divorce you, or hiding an illegitimate child, or blackmail over a family scandal -- those are no longer realistic motivations."

And so, in A Great Deliverance, her first published novel, she opens with the decapitated body of a farmer, his blood-splattered daughter holding an ax, the horrified clergyman who happens on to the crime scene, and a rat feasting on the remains. Nope, not in Agatha Christie territory anymore.

George began writing as child when her mother gave her an old 1939 typewriter. When she graduated from high school, she graduated to an electric typewriter. But not until she graduated to a home computer (purchased by her husband in the 1983), did she actually try her hand at a novel. At the time, she was a schoolteacher and had been since 1974. But with the computer in front of her, she has said, it was put-up-or-shut-up time. She finished her first manuscript in 1983. But her first book wasn't published for five more years.

Though the Lynley/Havers novels are set in England -- as are the tales in her first book of short stories, 2002's I, Richard -- George is a Yank, born in Ohio and raised in Southern California. Maintaining a flat in London's South Kensington as a home base for research, George has been an Anglophile since a trip as a teenager to the United Kingdom, where she ultimately found that a British setting better served the fiction that she wanted to write. "The English tradition offers the great tapestry novel," she told Publishers Weekly in 1996, "where you have the emotional aspect of a detective's personal life, the circumstances of the crime and, most important, the atmosphere of the English countryside that functions as another character."

Readers have made her books standard features on the bestseller lists, and critics have noted the psychologically deft motives of her characters and her detailed, well-researched plotting. "A behemoth, staggering in depth and breadth, A Traitor to Memory leaves you simultaneously satisfied and longing for more. It's simply a supreme pleasure to spend time engrossed in this intense, well-written novel," the Miami Herald said in 2001. The Washington Post called 1990's Well-Schooled in Murder " a bewitching book, exasperatingly clever, and with a complex plot that must be peeled layer by layer like an onion." The Los Angeles Times once called her "the California author who does Britain as well as P.D. James." And in 1996, Entertainment Weekly placed George's eighth novel, In the Presence of the Enemy in their fiction top ten list of the year, where she kept company with John Updike, Frank McCourt, Stephen King, and Jon Krakauer.

In her mind, each book begins with the killer, the victim and the motive. She travels to London and stays at her flat there to research locales. And she writes long profiles about what drives her characters psychologically. The kick for the reader isn't necessarily whodunit but why they dun it.

"I don't mind if they know who the killer is," she has said. "I'm happy to surprise them with the psychology behind the crime. I'm interested in the dark side of man. I'm interested in taboos, and murder is the greatest taboo. Characters are fascinating in their extremity not in their happiness."

Good To Know

The original model for Lynley was Nigel Havers, the nobleman and hurdle-jumper in the film Chariots of Fire whose butler placed champagne flutes on the hurdles to keep him from knocking them over. She named Barbara Havers as an homage to the actor.

On page 900 of the rough draft for Deception on His Mind, George changed her mind about the identity of the killer.

George's ex-husband is her business manager.

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    1. Hometown:
      Seattle, Washington
    1. Date of Birth:
      February 26, 1949
    2. Place of Birth:
      Warren, Ohio
    1. Education:
      A.A. Foothill Community College, 1969; B.A. University of California, Riverside, 1970; M.S. California State University
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

Charlotte Bowen thought she was dead. She opened her eyes into cold and darkness. The cold was beneath her, feeling just like the ground in her mother's garden planter, where the never-stop drips from the outdoor tap made a patch of damp that was green and smelly. The darkness was everywhere. Black pushed against her like a heavy blanket, and she strained her eyes against it, trying to force out of the endless nothing a shape that might tell her she wasn't in a grave. She didn't move at first. She didn't reach out either fingers or toes because she didn't want to feel the sides of the coffin, because she didn't want to know that death was like this when she'd thought there'd be saints and sunlight and angels, with the angels sitting on swings playing harps.

Charlotte listened hard, but there was nothing to hear. She sniffed, but there was nothing to smell except the mustiness all round her, the way old stones smell after mould's grown on them. She swallowed and tasted the vague memory of apple juice. And the flavour was enough to make her recall.

He'd given her apple juice, hadn't he? He'd handed over a bottle with a cap that he'd loosened and shiny beads of moisture speckling its sides. He'd smiled and squeezed her shoulder once. He'd said, "Not to worry, Lottie. Your mum doesn't want that."

Mummy. That was what this was all about. Where was Mummy? What had happened to her? And to Lottie? What had happened to Lottie?

"There's been an accident," he'd said. "I'm to take you to your mum."

"Where?" she'd said. "Where's Mummy?" And then louder, because her stomach felt liquidy all of a sudden and she didn't like the way he was looking at her, "Tell me where's my mum! Tell me! Right now!"

"It's all right," he'd said quickly with a glance about. Just like Mummy, he was embarrassed because of her noise. "Quiet down, Lottie. She's in a Government safe house. Do you know what that means?"

Charlotte had shaken her head. She was, after all, only ten years old and most of the workings of the Government were a mystery to her. All she knew for sure was that being in the Government meant that Mummy left home before seven in the morning and usually didn't come back till after she was asleep. Mummy went to her office in Parliament Square. She went to her meetings in the Home Office. She went to the House of Commons. On Friday afternoons she held surgery for her constituents in Marylebone, while Lottie did her school prep, tucked out of sight in a yellow-walled room where the constituency's executive committee met.

"Behave yourself," her mother would say when Charlotte arrived after school each Friday afternoon. She'd give a meaningful tilt of her head in the direction of that yellow-walled room. "I don't want to hear a peep out of you till we leave. Is that clear?"

"Yes, Mummy."

And then Mummy would smile. "So give us a kiss," she would say. "And a hug. I want a hug as well." And she would stop her discussion with the parish priest or the Pakistani grocer from the Edgware Road or the local schoolteacher or whoever else wanted ten precious minutes of their MP's time. And she'd catch Lottie up in a stiff-armed hug that hurt. Then she'd swat her bottom and say, "Off with you now," and turn back to her visitor, saying, "Kids," with a chuckle.

Fridays were best. After Mummy's surgery, she and Lottie would ride home together and Lottie would tell her all about her week. Her mother would listen. She would nod, and sometimes pat Lottie's knee, but all the time she kept her eyes fixed to the road, just beyond their driver's head.

"Mummy," Lottie would say with a martyred sigh in a useless attempt to wrest her mother's attention from Marylebone High Street to herself. Mummy didn't have to look at the high street after all. It's not as if she was driving the car. "I'm talking to you. What're you looking for?"

"Trouble, Charlotte. I'm looking for trouble. You'd be wise to do the same."

Trouble had come, it seemed. But a Government safe house? What was that exactly? Was it a place to hide if someone dropped a bomb?

"Are we going to the safe house?" Lottie had gulped down the apple juice in a rush. It was a little peculiar--not nearly sweet enough--but she drank it down properly because she knew it was naughty to seem ungrateful to an adult.

"That we are," he'd said. "We're going to the safe house. Your mum's waiting there."

Which was all that she could remember distinctly. Things had got quite blurry after that. Her eyelids had grown heavy as they drove through London, and within minutes it seemed that she hadn't been able to hold up her head. At the back of her mind, she seemed to recall a kind voice saying, "That's the girl, Lottie. Have a nice kip, won't you," and a hand gently removing her specs.

At this final thought, Lottie inched her hands up to her face in the darkness, keeping them as near as possible to her body so that she wouldn't have to feel the sides of the coffin she was lying in. Her fingers touched her chin. They climbed slowly up her cheeks in a spider walk. They felt their way across the bridge of her nose. Her specs were gone.

That made no difference in the darkness, of course. But if the lights went on...Only how were lights to go on in a coffin?

Lottie took a shallow breath. Then another. And another. How much air? She wondered. How much time before...And why? Why?

She felt her throat getting tight and her chest getting hot. She felt her eyes burn. She thought, Mustn't cry, mustn't ever ever cry. Mustn't ever let anyone see...Except there was nothing to see, was there? There was nothing but endless black upon black. Which made her throat tight, which made her chest hot, which made her eyes burn all over again. Mustn't, Lottie thought. Mustn't cry. No, no.

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Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 29 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 11, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Finely Crafted

    Book 8 in the Inspector Lynley series Ms George knows how to sustain her readers' attention in tales that are not only suspenseful but finely crafted and delightfully intricate. With "In the Presence of the Enemy" she once more proves that she is one of the best classic British mystery novelist today. The story opens with the kidnapping of young Charlotte Bowen. The kidnapper(s) demand her father, publisher Dennis Luxford to pay an unusual ransom, " Divulge on the front page of his newspaper that he has fathered a child in a loveless tryst with Eve Bowen ". But Eve, a high ranking influential member of parliament hesitates and refuses to go along with the demand. She believes that Dennis has engineered everything to discredit her and is so convinced it is a hoax she steadfastly refuses to involve the authorities. The story advances at a rapid pace and the plot thickens when another child disappears. After realizing the determination of the kidnapper(s), Inspector Lynley and Detective Havers from Scotland Yard are called upon and brought up to speed. Following this duo as they piece clue after clue is a riveting experience, the writer plunges us into an adrenaline filled game of cat and mouse. Ms George spoon feeds her readers tit-bits of information seemingly leading them down the garden path and at just the right time she jumps track and throws her readers completely off balance. Being unpredictable helps pique the readers interest even more. Along with the main plot, interlaced are sub-plots involving Lynley's financé Helen who is wrestling with her own demons and making a small but important appearance is forensic scientist Simon and his wife Deborah. All the characters are believable although not all likeable but definitely all expertly drawn to keep us captivated. This is a suspense filled mystery from start to finish, one of Ms George's best.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 8, 2011

    If you like the Lynley series you will love this book!

    I keep thinking that the last Lynley series book I have read has to be the best in the series. "This Body of Death," " For the Sake of Eleana," " No One as Witness" - all great reads - all as good as the one before it. " In the Presence of the Enemy" IMO rises as equal to the aforementioned. I blasted through it in three days not being able to put it down. The twists and turns continually surprised me - like a great thrill ride - you come away totally blown away, amazed how much fun it was. Finally, I have downloaded the first book in this series, "A great Deliverance" and will try to take my time with it. So far, with this series, that is easier said than done.

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  • Posted November 15, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Character and story, what more could you ask for?

    I an going through the Elizabeth George series pretty quickly-----I began with Pursuit of a Proper Sinner then realized that the recurring characters have a back story, so I went on line, got a list of the books in chronological order and have been following the development of the major players. Entwined with well drawn and interesting characters, the plot of each subsequent book is compelling. I usually buy two at a time, hoping that the others will still be there when I go back the next week.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2008

    avid reader

    I hadn't heard of Elizabeth George before reading this book. My mom read it and passed it on to me. I had trouble putting it down and was forced to go get George's other Inspector Linley books, so I could start from the beginning. She is the only author I read consistantly. Her stories are suspenseful and intelligent.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2003

    FOUND A NEW ARTIST

    After taking a chance at a book sale, I bought this book, having never heard of Elizabeth George, I found this book to fantastic reading. I couldn't put it down, after I started. Has you trying to determine the killer and being totally suprised at the end. I'm looking forward to reading more books by her. This book would make a great movie.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2001

    One of Ms. George's Best

    An addicting read. Ms. George's characters are compellingly rendered and the plot finely tuned. Some complain about Ms. George's lengthy exposition, but I find that it makes the full breadth of the novel feel far more alive. Also kudos to Ms. George for expanding and bringing the excellent, complex Barbara Havers character more to the forefront of the action in this book. (And making her the leading character in the sequel.) As satisfying a mystery as you are ever likely to read.

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