In the Shadow of the Crown

In the Shadow of the Crown

3.5 11
by Jean Plaidy
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

As Henry VIII's only child, the future seemed golden for Princess Mary. She was the daughter of Henry's first queen, Katharine of Aragon, and was heir presumptive to the throne of England. Red-haired like her father, she was also intelligent and deeply religious like her staunchly Catholic mother. But her father's ill-fated love for Anne Boleyn would shatter Mary's…  See more details below

Overview

As Henry VIII's only child, the future seemed golden for Princess Mary. She was the daughter of Henry's first queen, Katharine of Aragon, and was heir presumptive to the throne of England. Red-haired like her father, she was also intelligent and deeply religious like her staunchly Catholic mother. But her father's ill-fated love for Anne Boleyn would shatter Mary's life forever. The father who had once adored her was now intent on having a male heir at all costs. He divorced her mother and, at the age of twelve, Mary was banished from her father’s presence, stripped of her royal title, and replaced by his other children--first Elizabeth, then Edward. Worst of all, she never saw her beloved mother again; Katharine was exiled too, and died soon after. Lonely and miserable, Mary turned for comfort to the religion that had sustained her mother.

In a stroke of fate, however, Henry's much-longed-for son died in his teens, leaving Mary the legitimate heir to the throne. It was, she felt, a sign from God--proof that England should return to the Catholic Church. Swayed by fanatical advisors and her own religious fervor, Mary made horrific examples of those who failed to embrace the Church, earning her the immortal nickname "Bloody Mary." She was married only once, to her Spanish cousin Philip II--a loveless and childless marriage that brought her to the edge of madness.

With In the Shadow of the Crown, Jean Plaidy brings to life the dark story of a queen whose road to the throne was paved with sorrow.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780307496140
Publisher:
Crown/Archetype
Publication date:
01/21/2009
Series:
A Queens of England Novel , #6
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
416
Sales rank:
303,733
File size:
3 MB

Meet the Author

JEAN PLAIDY, one of the preeminent authors of historical fiction for most of the twentieth century, is the pen name of the prolific English author Eleanor Hibbert, also known as Victoria Holt. Jean Plaidy’s novels had sold more than 14 million copies worldwide by the time of her death in 1993.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

In the Shadow of the Crown 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It was good but too much repetition, I would have liked the same emotion put in her other books like Queen of this rralm about Elizabeth I, or Katherine of Aragon, Lady In The Tower used here. My favorite fiction book of Mary has been thus far Daughter of Henry VIII by Rosemary Churchill. I recommend this though if you are a die hard fan of history and Tudors like me but be aware there won't be that much insight or in depth as her previous books.
CCANCELL More than 1 year ago
If you read the previous books on the series, you can skip several chapters. Before you get to the actual story of Mary's ascension you have to read (again) everything that happened before during her early years.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
I thought Mary's character was very intresting, and i found myself thinking throught the story, 'what would i do if i was in that situation' as an actor i love a book that can make me think of a characters motivation. I enjoyed growing up with Mary and watching her grow. However Jean Plaidy's writing style differs greatly from most other historical writers. She basicly told it strait up, how it was, very little emotion or climaxes. I also found the repetition of ideas very dull. for example, she mentions once that she would like to marry Reginald, just like their mothers had wanted. And this thought is repeated almost every chapter, sometimes several times. There were others to.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book gives you a look at marys world as she saw it, and it gives her a chance to defend herself in her bloody reign. Plaidy portrays her as a girl who is one minded and unconfindent in her own decisons, she really believes she needs a man to help her rule her counrty. Plaidy also implies that marys problems rest in the treatment of mother and herself at the hands of her father.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Don't get me wrong, I don't want to be a review that discourages you from reading this book because it really is wonderful, Jean Plaidy writes wonderful books, but her writing in general bothers me sometimes. I don't think there's enough dialogue or as detailed discriptions of the setting as I have seen in other writers. I thought Mary's view was quite interesting, but probably inaccurate to her true character. I whole-heartedly believe that Mary was probably much more embittered than she was portrayed by the author. I really don't think she was as sympathetic as in the book.... after all they call her Bloody Mary for a reason. I do think she had mercy in her, but still too bitter to see straight. Tendency to hold grudges. Don't see that in the book. By the way, I ALSO don't approve her implying that Elizabeth was a virgin. Ha! That's practically impossible either way you look at it. The odds are highly against it. They call her virgin queen simply because she never married, and unmarried women are supposed to be thought of as virgins....hence the term 'maiden name' All and all it was a still a good book and I do recommend it
Guest More than 1 year ago
First off, I'm excited that several of Jean Plaidy's (real name Eleanor Hibbert) books are now back in print. I had always wondered what Mary's story would have been like if she had personally told it. I was delighted to see Jean Plaidy had written a book on Mary. I really enjoyed this book. Mary in the 1st person allowed for the reader to see events as she saw it. I first encountered Jean Plaidy in high school and all the books I've read by her are a pleasure. Jean Plaidy is a wonderful story teller, and it's easy to see why she was a successful writer.