×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

In the Shadow of the Silent Majorities
     

In the Shadow of the Silent Majorities

by Jean Baudrillard, Jean Baudillard
 
The masses aren't the Social. They absorb all the social energy, but no longer refract it. They absorb every sign and every meaning, but no longer reflect them. They never participate. They are the reversion of any social and of any socialism. They wander through meaning, politics, representation, history, ideology, with a somnambulent strength of denial. Indeed the

Overview

The masses aren't the Social. They absorb all the social energy, but no longer refract it. They absorb every sign and every meaning, but no longer reflect them. They never participate. They are the reversion of any social and of any socialism. They wander through meaning, politics, representation, history, ideology, with a somnambulent strength of denial. Indeed the only phenomenon that may be in a relation of affinity with it, is terrorism. Contemporary terrorism aims at the Social in response to the terrorism of the Social.

Published one year after Forget Foucault, In the Shadow of the Silent Majorities (1978) may be the most important sociopolitical manifesto of the twentieth century: it calls for nothing less than the end of both sociology and politics. Disenfranchised revolutionaries (the Red Brigades, the Baader-Meinhof Gang) hoped to reach the masses directly through spectacular actions, but their message merely played into the hands of the media and the state. In a media society meaning has no meaning anymore; communication merely communicates itself. Jean Baudrillard uses this last outburst of ideological terrorism in Europe to showcase the end of the "Social." In the electronic media society, all the masses can do-and all they will do-is enjoy the spectacle. In In the Shadow of the Silent Majorities, ideological terrorism doesn't represent anything anymore, writes Baudrillard, not even itself. It is just the last hysterical reaction to discredited political illusions.

Internationally renowned as a twenty-first-century philosopher, reporter and provocateur, Jean Baudrillard has upset all existing theories of contemporary society with scathing humor and clinicalprecision. His major books in English are Simulations, Fatal Strategies, Impossible Exchange and The Intelligence of Evil.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780936756004
Publisher:
Semiotexte/Smart Art
Publication date:
06/01/1983
Series:
Semiotext(e) / Foreign Agents Series
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
128
Product dimensions:
6.80(w) x 4.40(h) x 0.40(d)

Meet the Author

Jean Baudrillard (1929--2007) was a philosopher, sociologist, cultural critic, and theorist of postmodernity who challenged all existing theories of contemporary society with humor and precision. An outsider in the French intellectual establishment, he was internationally renowned as a twenty-first century visionary, reporter, and provocateur.

Sylvère Lotringer is Jean Baudrillard Chair at the European Graduate School, Switzerland, and Professor Emeritus of French literature and philosophy at Columbia University.

Kate Zambreno, the author of two novels, O Fallen Angel and Green Girl and the work Heroines (Semiotext(e)), teaches in the writing programs at Columbia University and Sarah Lawrence College. She is at work on a series of books about time, memory, and the persistence of art, which includes Book of Mutter and the forthcoming Drifts.

Chris Kraus is the author of the novels Aliens and Anorexia, I Love Dick, Torpor, and Summer of Hate as well as Video Green: Los Angeles Art and the Triumph of Nothingness and Where Art Belongs, all published by Semiotext(e). A Professor of Writing at the European Graduate School, she writes for various magazines and lives in Los Angeles.

John Johnston is Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Emory University in Atlanta. He is the author of Carnival of Repetition and Information Multiplicity.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews