In the Skin of a Lion

( 10 )

Overview

Bristling with intelligence and shimmering with romance, this novel tests the boundary between history and myth. Patrick Lewis arrives in Toronto in the 1920s and earns his living searching for a vanished millionaire and tunneling beneath Lake Ontario. In the course of his adventures, Patrick's life intersects with those of characters who reappear in Ondaatje's Booker Prize-winning The English Patient. 256 pp.
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In the Skin of a Lion

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Overview

Bristling with intelligence and shimmering with romance, this novel tests the boundary between history and myth. Patrick Lewis arrives in Toronto in the 1920s and earns his living searching for a vanished millionaire and tunneling beneath Lake Ontario. In the course of his adventures, Patrick's life intersects with those of characters who reappear in Ondaatje's Booker Prize-winning The English Patient. 256 pp.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"A triumph -- a powerful and revelatory accomplishment."
--The Times Literary Supplement

"Splendidly evocative and entertaining."
--The Toronto Star

"A brilliantly imaginative blend of history, lore, passion and poetry."
--Russell Banks

"What is most moving is the human connectedness of this book… so densly erotic, so subtly sensual, so intensely responsive."
--Malahat Review

"Ondaatje has written into the vivid life of fiction a part of the history of the building of Toronto as no official history would have conceived it and as no official history can now erase it."
--Adele Wiseman

"In the Skin of a Lion is an act of magic!"
--Alberto Manguel

"Beautiful … I urge you to read this book."
--The New York Times

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780679772668
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 1/28/1997
  • Series: Vintage International Series
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 231,374
  • Product dimensions: 5.10 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.49 (d)

Meet the Author

Michael Ondaatje
Michael Ondaatje is the author of three previous novels, a memoir and eleven books of poetry. His novel The English Patient won the Booker Prize. Born in Sri Lanka, he moved to Canada in 1962 and now lives in Toronto.
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Read an Excerpt

An April night in 1917. Harris and Pomphrey were on the bridge, in the dark wind. Pomphrey had turned west and was suddenly stilled. His hand reached out to touch Harris on the shoulder, a gesture he had never made before.

-- Look!

Walking on the bridge were five nuns.

Past the Dominion Steel castings wind attacked the body directly. The nuns were walking past the first group of workers at the fire. The bus, Harris thought, must have dropped them off near Castle Frank and the nuns had, with some confusion at that hour, walked the wrong way in the darkness.

They had passed the black car under the trees and talking cheerfully stepped past the barrier into a landscape they did not know existed -- onto a tentative carpet over the piers, among the night labourers. They saw the fire and the men. A few tried to wave them back. There was a mule attached to a wagon. The hiss and jump of machines made the ground under them lurch. A smell of creosote. One man was washing his face in a barrel of water.

The nuns were moving towards a thirty-yard point on the bridge when the wind began to scatter them. They were thrown against the cement mixers and steam shovels, careering from side to side, in danger of going over the edge.

Some of the men grabbed and enclosed them, pulling leather straps over their shoulders, but two were still loose. Harris and Pomphrey at the far end looked on helplessly as one nun was lifted up and flung against the compressors. She stood up shakily and then the wind jerked her sideways, scraping her along the concrete and right off the edge of the bridge. She disappeared into the night by the third abutment, into the long depth of air which held nothing, only sometimes a rivet or a dropped hammer during the day.

Then there was no longer any fear on the bridge. The worst, the incredible had happened. A nun had fallen off the Prince Edward Viaduct before it was even finished. The men covered in wood shavings or granite dust held the women against them. And Commissioner Harris at the far end stared along the mad pathway. This was his first child and it had already become a murderer.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 10 )
Rating Distribution

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(4)

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Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 18, 2009

    What a waste!

    I don't agree at all with the gushing praise--sorry, but this book was one of my least favorite of all time. I only finished it because it was a book club selection and I kept hoping I would start to like the book.
    The characters, I'll admit, are interesting. But their motivation is completely unexplained and some of what they do makes no sense. I really dislike the writer's style; the periodic insertion of sections akin to free verse poetry didn't seem natural, but rather, contrived to show how "singular" or erudite the author is. The plot was plodding at some points, and highly implausable at others. Overall this struck me as a book just trying too hard to be artistic.

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  • Posted July 27, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Is there a better book in English?

    I carry this with me wherever I travel because just a page or 2 reboots me. Always fresh, always amazing. The writing, the vision, is like nothing else. The nun falling off the bridge -- read just that passage early in the book and you will see. It's not what you think. This book completely transcends categories of men's vs women's books. If you can think and imagine this is your book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2007

    Definitely amazing...Ondaatje as good as ever in this book

    I read this book back in school...amazing. The novel was very well written and Ondaatje brilliantly illustrates us the lives of the characters. I recall an excerpt describing Nicholas Tem. as he is working on the bridge...best I have read in years. I truly recommend this book and definitely Ondaatje's best so far, and I can't wait for the new one.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2005

    Excruciating.

    Everyone told me this book was really good. I turned page after page waiting for it to get good. It never happened. The plot never went anywhere... Patrick just cries about women the entire time. The writing style was also excruciating to read. It was too fragmented... I'm all for 'leaving things to the imagination', but when the plot has trouble moving along because there is no backbone to the book... you have a problem. Overall bad, bad book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 29, 2001

    A great journey

    If you are looking for a book you can escape into another era, and another place this is the book for you. Ondaaje's characters are intriguing and alive.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2001

    a dizzyingly beautiful experience--- my favorite novel

    I was assigned to read this book for a post-colonial literature class in Dublin, but I later learned it was the professor's favorite novel and still believe that he secretly assigned it to us as a gift. . . Patrick White, who Ondaatje kills off without much attention in the English Patient, is an ingenius non-character. Through him we experience this fascinating and exciting underground world of Toronto's immigrant working class. We never find out too much about him, but through him we really see how vital our friends and loves are in our lives. . . There is some point in the novel where Clara tells Patrick that 'people are replaced' and Ondaatje makes it true. the sincerity of the flux of the central love story here is this novel's greatest strength. Ovid wrote of one of his mythological characters, 'Never before did one's heart have such a capacity for love.' That's how I feel about Patrick, so incredible is his love for Clara, and for her remarkable replacement. . . the death of Alice Gull is one of the most gut wrenching sequences I've ever read, and it begins so beautifully with some line like 'he had always wanted to know Alice Gull when she was old. . .' God I cry at those first lines every time I read them. . . reading this great book should give you the patience to follow the surreal plot. There is a line in the middle of the novel that explains what the first line of every novel should be. . . when you get to it you'll be glad you did.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 16, 2000

    Perfect Writing, Near Perfect Story

    Ondaatje may well be the best writer today of romantic image, mood and intent. This story is fantastic in the ideal of a Mark Helprin novel and succeeds there competantly. Most perfect, however, in layering Patrick Lewis' discoveries of love for two women over time, building one over the veneer of the other. This and the romantic characters of a richly explained trade, Temelcoff one of the author's best figures to date. An excellent book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 26, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

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