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In the Wind: The Folk Music Collection

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Richie Unterberger
About six months after the release of the early-'60s folk boom satire film A Mighty Wind, along came this rather similarly titled collection of folk revival relics, most from the first half of the 1960s though a few are from the mid- to late '50s, and a Woody Guthrie 1940s version of "This Land Is Your Land" leads off the disc. Some of this stuff is indeed the sort of wholesome folk revival stuff lampooned in A Mighty Wind: the Kingston Trio "A Worried Man", the Brothers Four "Greenfields", the New Christy Minstrels "Saturday Night", the Limeliters "John Henry, the Steel Driving Man", and the Chad Mitchell Trio a 1962 version of "Blowin' in the Wind" that predates ...
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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Richie Unterberger
About six months after the release of the early-'60s folk boom satire film A Mighty Wind, along came this rather similarly titled collection of folk revival relics, most from the first half of the 1960s though a few are from the mid- to late '50s, and a Woody Guthrie 1940s version of "This Land Is Your Land" leads off the disc. Some of this stuff is indeed the sort of wholesome folk revival stuff lampooned in A Mighty Wind: the Kingston Trio "A Worried Man", the Brothers Four "Greenfields", the New Christy Minstrels "Saturday Night", the Limeliters "John Henry, the Steel Driving Man", and the Chad Mitchell Trio a 1962 version of "Blowin' in the Wind" that predates Bob Dylan's release of the song. But this anthology's scope is broader than that, also including earthier, more venerated legends like Pete Seeger "Where Have All the Flowers Gone", Odetta "He's Got the Whole World in His Hands", Phil Ochs "I'll Be There," recorded around 1963 but not issued until the late '80s, and Judy Collins her pre-Byrds version of Seeger's "Turn! Turn! Turn!". There are also the curious, nearly forgotten 1950s Top Ten hits by Vince Martin "Cindy Oh Cindy" and the Tarriers "Banana Boat Song," though Harry Belafonte's simultaneous hit version was much better. Of most interest to collectors, perhaps, are the more obscure tracks, including Hoyt Axton's 1962 version of his composition "Greenback Dollar" covered for a hit by the Kingston Trio, Barry McGuire's 1963 solo single "One By One" penned by Rod McKuen, and McKuen's own unfunny satire "Advice to Folk Singers." Overall, it's a reasonably solid roundup of some of the more popular folk revival songs and performers, though of course it's missing too many big names and hits to be anointed as the best single-disc best-of for the genre.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 9/30/2003
  • Label: Varese Fontana
  • UPC: 030206642728
  • Catalog Number: 066427

Album Credits

Technical Credits
Hoyt Axton Composer
Erik Darling Composer
Woody Guthrie Composer
Phil Ochs Composer
Pete Seeger Composer
Bobby Darin Composer
Bob Dylan Composer
Terry Gilkyson Composer
Tom Glazer Composer
Rod McKuen Composer, Producer
Mark Abramson Producer
Alan Arkin Composer
Moses Asch Engineer
Bob Bollard Producer
Bob Carey Composer
Voyle Gilmore Producer
Dave Guard Composer
Jac Holzman Producer
David Hubert Producer
Bob Morgan Producer
Allan Shaw Producer
Joseph F. Laredo Liner Notes
Randy Sparks Composer, Producer
Marty Wekser Producer
Richard Dehr Composer
Patrick Clancy Producer
Frank Miller Composer
Traditional Composer
Kennard Ramsey Composer
Bob Barron Composer
Burt Long Composer
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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Broad sampling of the folk-revival

    In the wake of Christopher Guest’s mockumentary, “A Mighty Wind,” Varese’s pulled together eighteen tracks that essay the folk revival of the early-60s. To get at the revival’s roots, the collection begins with a trio of seminal inspirations: Woody Guthrie’s late-40’s recording of “This Land is Your Land” and mid-50’s tracks by Pete Seeger (“Where Have All the Flowers Gone”) and Odetta (“He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands”). ¶ By the early ‘60s the folk trios and quartets of Greenwich Village, North Beach San Francisco and college campuses everywhere were in heavy rotation. Several fine examples can be heard here, including The Kingston Trio’s “A Worried man” (penned by the Trio’s Dave Guard along with Tom Glazer, the latter of whom would return to fame with “On Top of Spaghetti”), The Limeliters banjo-driven “John Henry, The Steel Driving man,” The Brothers Four’s chart-smash “Greenfields,” and The Chad Mitchell Trio’s early reading of Dylan’s “Blowin’ in the Wind.” ¶ Of interest to collectors will be The Tarriers’ version of “The Banana Boat Song,” which paralleled Belafonte’s single up the chart, and Vince Martin’s 1956 take of “Cindy Oh Cindy,” a song eventually covered by Eddie Fisher, The Beach Boys, and Waylon Jennings! Hoyt Axton’s original “Greenback Dollar,” sung slow, solo and with a bluesier edge than the Kingston Trio’s cover hit is also a treat, as is Judy Collins’ pre-Byrds “Turn! Turn! Turn! (To Everything There is a Season).” Phil Ochs “I’ll Be There,” recorded in 1963, but unreleased until 1987, is the only post-50s track that feels more like “folk” than “folk revival.” ¶ Folk/beat poet/opportunist Rod McKuen makes a trio of appearances; first, as songwriter of Barry “Eve of Destruction” McGuire’s treacly “One by One,” second as songwriter and co-singer (with Jimmie Rogers) on “Two-Ten, Six-Eighteen (Doesn’t Anybody Know My Name),” and again with the original talking-blues “Advice to Folk Singers.” McGuire also checks in as lead-singer of The New Christy Minstrels (you’ll swear you’re listening to The New Main Street Singers from “A Mighty Wind”). ¶ This collection covers an impressive amount of ground in eighteen cuts. Rather than attempting to be authoritative in a single disc (after all, no Dylan, no Peter, Paul & Mary, etc.), the track list bridges the inspirational works of the 40s and 50s with the revival of the 60s. It’s an interesting introduction from which a listener can draw direction for further exploration.

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