In Through the Out Door

In Through the Out Door

4.5 2
by Led Zeppelin
     
 

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Marshalling their strength after the dark interlude of Presence -- a period that extended far after its 1976 release, with the band spending a year in tax exile and Robert Plant suffering another personal tragedy when his son died -- Led Zeppelin decided to push into new sonic territory on their eighth album, In Through the Out Door. A good deal of this

Overview

Marshalling their strength after the dark interlude of Presence -- a period that extended far after its 1976 release, with the band spending a year in tax exile and Robert Plant suffering another personal tragedy when his son died -- Led Zeppelin decided to push into new sonic territory on their eighth album, In Through the Out Door. A good deal of this aural adventurism derived from internal tensions within the band. Jimmy Page and John Bonham were in the throes of their own addictions, leaving Plant and John Paul Jones alone in the studio to play with the bassist's new keyboard during the day. Jones wound up with writing credits on all but one of the seven songs -- the exception is "Hot Dog," a delightfully dirty rockabilly throwaway -- and he and Plant are wholly responsible for the cloistered, grooving "South Bound Saurez" and "All My Love," a synth-slathered ballad unlike anything in Zeppelin's catalog due not only to its keyboards but its vulnerability. What's striking about In Through the Out Door is how the Plant-Jones union points the way toward their respective solo careers, especially that of the singer's: his 1982 debut Pictures at Eleven follows through on the twilight majesty of "In the Evening" and particularly "Carouselambra," which feels like Plant and Jones stitched together every synth-funk fantasy they had into a throttling ten-minute epic. With its carnivalesque rhythms, "Fool in the Rain" also suggests the adventurousness of Plant, but it's also an effective showcase for Bonham -- it's a monster groove -- and Page, whose multi-octave solo is among his best. Elsewhere, the guitarist colors with shade and light quite effectively, but only the slow, slumbering closer "I'm Gonna Crawl" feels like his, a throwback to Zeppelin's past on an album that suggests a future that never materialized for the band.

Product Details

Release Date:
08/16/1994
Label:
Atlantic
UPC:
0075679244321
catalogNumber:
92443

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In Through the Out Door 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'm not sure what all the hemming and hawing is about. This album is pure Zeppelin - blending the unique gifts of its four members into yet another awesome version of the "White Man's Blues". The fact that it turned out to be their last album imbues it with a special significance. Apart from their total chemistry being on display for the last time its hard not to listen to Bonham's drumming in particular. Does his playing get any better than his performance in "Fool in the Rain"? It's surprpising that a drumset could withstand such an assault. Kudos to the manufacturer of the kit he used.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was just listening to ITTOD the other day and decided I liked it a little more than I thought I did. 'All My Love', 'Fool In the Rain' and especially 'I'm Gonna Crawl' are all excellent Zep tunes. In fact, if it wasn't for the overlong 'Carouselambra', my rating would be just a tad higher. Bottom line: Not Zeppelin's best, but not their worst either.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I bought 'ITTOD' when it was new back in the fall of 1979, paper bag and all - the first LZ album I remember as a new release. True, it's not the kind of rockin' album that just about all their previous albums were (especially II, IV and Physical Grafitti), but it did come out after the punk, new wave and disco movements in pop and it showed. Particularly that John Paul Jones had more of an influence in the music than ever before (so there's more synthesizers in the mix). Even though ITTOD seems to be Led Zep fans' least favorite album overall, it's still very good and shows the direction they might've taken if Bonham lived on. Even with all the synth arrangements on "In the Evening" and "Caroselamba", Bonzo still slams out beats as he always did (kind of like how 80's Rush albums like 'Power Windows', usually criticized for being overly-synthed, still have slamming Neil Peart drumming as always). "I'm Gonna Crawl" is a great eerie bluesy track not unlike "Since I've Been Loving You" and "Tea for One", but with a nice string accompiment. Most of the album sounds as if Jimmy Page took something of a back seat to the others (Jones in particular) but considering what he did for seven albums prior, one can easily forgive him (he turns in good guitar work all the same, if not with his trademark Zeppelin riffs a la "Whole Lotta Love" or "Black Dog" -- again, the album came out in 1979, not 1972 - he had been there and done that many times over). Robert Plant's vocals sound more unintelligible than ever before, weary and worn, likely that having suffered from the death of his son a few years back left its mark. Overally, ITTOD should be in your Led Zeppelin collection. It's more a 'play at home' album than a 'play in your car at top volume' one like their 2nd and 4th albums.
Guest More than 1 year ago
and the truth is even "led zeppelin" can screw up. it breaks my heart to say it, but the god of rock'n'roll is an honest one, and even my love to zep (and there's a whole lot of it) can't change that. it doesn't mean that there's nothing in there for their fans. "in the evening" is a good old psychodelic trip, and "all my love" is as kicking as it is fool of love. but besides those two, the magic just ain't there no more.
Guest More than 1 year ago
True enough, that new wave and disco had sprung up and Zeppelin was experimenting with these styles. But this album is really bassist/keyboardist John Paul Jones's baby, for reason that Jimmy Page, the band mastermind guitarist, was heavily into drugs during this period. That aside, this is a pretty good album. The classic heaviness of Zep makes one last hurrah on 'In The Evening'; equally impressive are the gloriously Latin-pop 'Fool in the Rain' and the catchy ballad 'All My Love'. 'Hot Dog' is a rockabilly number best not taken too seriously. The track that most often leaves casual listeners in the lurch is 'Carouselambra', a long and indulgent synth-epic that becomes more enjoyable once one studies its nuances (Page said it was based on the progression of the seasons). Taken as a whole, In Through the Out Door does not equal the achievement of their best work, but it is essential anyway as their last regular studio album.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Let's face it... Led Zepp was the best band to EVER live, so a not-so-great album in Led Zepp Land is a great album in Big Scheme Of Things Land. Although it may have some duds like Carouselambra, it's definitely still worth buying.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In this album what I read was that Jones took over much of what Jimmy Page was doing because there had been many problems since the last album. Accidents and tragedy, it was a miracle that they could manage to produce something again. So John Paul Jones contributed a lot here, in composition and instumental ideas. In the melody and pop sense I think this album is better than Presence and maybe all the ones before. But in a Rock sense it´s much worse. Page and Plant are just not the same as before. The life they had seems to have vanished in a great percentage. Four stars because of that. Nobodys perfect even this gods of music.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Led Zeppelin is the best band to ever play they do every thing!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
In Thru The out Door is pure Zepplin magic. Plain and simple: It Rocks. Hands down.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This album shows all of the signs of a band that is about to fall apart (unbeknownst to them): Bonzo drinking himself to death, Jimmy's inability to stop his heroin addiction, Plant's grief over Karac... All in all, this album encompasses all of that. In the Evening seems like a disco tribute of sorts. South Bound Suarez and Fool in the Rain compliment each other with their Latin flavor. Hot Dog feels like big band. Carouselambra is too long and feels like a carousel. All My Love is a nice tribute to Karac, but doesn't do it for me. I'm Gonna Crawl is the last song that makes it so hard to say goodbye. This may not be the quintessential Led Zeppelin album, but it is a fond farewell to them.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
This album is full of jazz and track "Carouselambra" is too long (10 minutes). I can't believe that Led Zeppelin makes this kind of material! Well, we all have bad moments...but "All My Love" is good song.