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In Your Honor
     

In Your Honor

3.6 15
by Foo Fighters
 

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Since he started the Foo Fighters a decade or so back, Dave Grohl has approached fans with one hand clenched into a power-rock fist and the other proffering a flower of sprightly pop. He and his bandmates perfect that approach on this two-disc offering, which siphons Grohl's dual impulses into two separate discs. Disc 1 sets knobs to 11, from the eerie swoops of the

Overview

Since he started the Foo Fighters a decade or so back, Dave Grohl has approached fans with one hand clenched into a power-rock fist and the other proffering a flower of sprightly pop. He and his bandmates perfect that approach on this two-disc offering, which siphons Grohl's dual impulses into two separate discs. Disc 1 sets knobs to 11, from the eerie swoops of the trebly title track right on through to the end. Rather than by-the-book metal -- something Grohl got out of his system on his Probot side project -- the Foos delve into dark, gristly space-rock on tunes like the Hawkwind-styled "D.O.A." and the over-the-top, Rush-meets-Devo freakout "Free Me." It's the mellowed-out, '70s-styled second disc, however, that offers the most surprises -- thanks in large part to a far-flung assortment of guest stars. While none of them out-and-out steals the show from Grohl and company, it's impossible to understate the effect of hearing John Paul Jones pluck out a rustic mandolin line on "Another Round," one of a few tunes redolent of immersion in Led Zeppelin III. Jones pops up again -- this time behind the piano -- on the stately "Miracle," but that song gains most of its buoyancy from Petra Haden's violin playing. The most intriguing collaboration of all is the tune that bears the least resemblance to ghosts of Foos past -- a bossa nova–tinged slink entitled "Virginia Moon," on which Norah Jones beckons the band to lounge territory with sexy aplomb. As with most ambitiously scaled sets, In Your Honor is plumped up a bit, but there's enough meat on its bones to satisfy virtually any Foophile's craving.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Although it was as big a commercial success as Foo Fighters' three previous albums, 2002's One by One seemed flat and tired, as if their leader, Dave Grohl, had reached a songwriting slump or as if the band had exhausted its possibilities. The time was ripe for a reinvention, or at least a risk, and the group responded accordingly with In Your Honor, a double album containing one disc of hard rock and one disc of acoustic material. Splitting music along such a clear dividing line is dangerous: since each disc explores one specific territory, each could sound monochromatic, but instead of falling into this trap, Foo Fighters benefit from these self-imposed constraints. Both the rock and acoustic albums have their own distinct character -- more so than, say, Guns N' Roses' separately released Use Your Illusion's, which felt like one gigantic sprawling album -- and while each is recognizably the work of Foo Fighters, neither feels as formulaic as One by One. While the acoustic album would seem to be the biggest break from tradition -- not only does it have a hushed, subdued mood, but it's filled with guest stars, including several appearances by Led Zeppelin's John Paul Jones, a duet with Norah Jones on "Virginia Moon," and Queens of the Stone Age's Josh Homme returning the favor of Grohl's drumming on Songs for the Deaf by laying down guitar on "Razor" -- both albums showcase a reinvigorated band that is eager to stretch out and experiment. As such, the rock album not only hits much harder than One by One -- arguably, it rocks harder than any of their other records -- but its has fluid musicality and a new found sense of drama that gives it a nearly cinematic sense of scope. Naturally, the acoustic album is quieter, but it also has a similar flow and easy grace that makes it a fitting complement to the harder first record. Previous Foo Fighters albums have had the problem of being a little inconsistent, both in terms of material and in terms of maintaining a consistent sound, but here, perhaps because of the focused direction of the two albums, they not only sustain a consistent mood on each record, but the songs on each are strong, hooky, and memorable. Which means that In Your Honor pulls off a neat trick: by stretching out, Foo Fighters not only have expanded their sound, but they've found the core of why their music works, so they now have better songs and deliver them more effectively. It makes for certainly their most consistent, arguably their best album yet.

Product Details

Release Date:
06/14/2005
Label:
Rca
UPC:
0828766803822
catalogNumber:
68038
Rank:
50924

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Foo Fighters   Primary Artist
John Paul Jones   Mandolin,Piano
Dave Grohl   Guitar,Drums,Vocals,Group Member
Josh Homme   Guitar
Rami Jaffee   Keyboards
Petra Haden   Violin
Nate Mendel   Group Member
Danny Clinch   Harmonica
Nick Raskulinecz   Bass,Bass Guitar,Double Bass
Chris Shiflett   Guitar,Group Member
Taylor Hawkins   Drums,Vocals,Group Member
Norah Jones   Piano,Vocals
Joe Beebe   Guitar

Technical Credits

Mike Terry   Engineer
Foo Fighters   Composer,Producer,Audio Production
Kevin Reagan   Art Direction
Nick Raskulinecz   Producer,Audio Production
Brett Kilroe   Artwork
Robin C. Hendrickson   Artwork

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

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In Your Honor 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 15 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Great band, Great album, Great buy. You get all you can ask for and then some. Enjoy
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm appalled to think someone wants the Foo Fighters to shut up! As a matter of fact I'm listening to the Foo Fighters right now! Their CD never leaves my CD player, is always on when I get on the computer and is my all time favorite CD! I luv The way they make their songs have that soft edge so they aren't scream-o but still make you want to pick up your guitar and JAM! Speaking of guitar Dave is like a god when it comes to playing guitar! Their CD is the perfect thing to listen to when you are having a bad day and just want to block it all out. I use this CD to wind down after a long day of classes and frankly PEOPLE! The songs they write have levels if you want to think or they can just be songs if you don't feel like thinking. I understand if you don't like rock you might not like Foo Fighters. But, If you claim to be a die hard rock fan then there is NO reason you should not like the Foo Fighters. In fact I will go as far to say that if you don't like the Foo Fighters you are NOT a die hard rock fan! Also there acoustic approach was good as well. "Over and Out" is the coolest song to play on the guitar.
David81 More than 1 year ago
I recommended to everybody!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This album does not just "suck", as many of your friends will likely tell you. Quite the contrary, really. Let's just get it out in the open: this is a mainstream stadium-friendly rock album, and nothing more (well, the second disc is something more, but let's ignore that for now). Dave Grohl knows that he has a responsibility to craft stadium-sized rock songs now that he has firmly established himself as a very famous musician in a very famous band. He succeeds in that. These are big, sleekly-produced songs - anything from the debut album now sounds positively lo-fi compared to In Your Honor. The truth is that the majority of current Foo Fighters fans will eagerly lick the spoon on this one. Sure, the songwriting isn't as memorable as it used to be, but the guitars sound like jets, the drumming is accomplished, Nate Mendel slyly crafts some excellent bass lines (as always), and Dave yells and sings with a whole lot of sincerity. It's actually very good in that stadium-rock kind of way. As for the second-disc, the Fighters of Foo should be applauded for trying to give their fans something special. Now I know the whole guest appearances thing is a bit corny, but I think this can be excused - I mean, these guys are kind of old now, and not quite as hip as you think you are.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I rarely make it a priority to buy a CD but I actually looked forward to buying this when it was released. I very highly enjoy listening to this album. I think the thing that make's Foo's music stands out is Grohl's voice. It's deep and powerfull. I loved the way this album opened with In Your Honor, a high voltage headbangin tune. It is a rare album where all of the songs are enjoyable. I even liked the acoustic CD. I would definately reccomend this to any Foo fan.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Wow, I can remember the emotional aftermath of losing a bandmate and pouring heart and soul into a beautiful solo album, giving it a name and stepping out into the world unshielded and under great criticism only to prevail and eventually be hailed as one of that day's rock steadfasts. Followed by yet another hauntingly gorgeous album that both soothed and rocked a listener back and forth, it seemed as if the years couldn't stop this force. But they did. The next two albums expressed a sense of mediocrity replacing a sense of urgency and slowly leading up to the current release "In Your Honor", which is one of the worst albums I have heard to date. Bottom line: THERE'S MUCH BETTER MUSIC BEING MADE IN THE WORLD TODAY. SEEK IT OUT!
Guest More than 1 year ago
hey i have no idea what that one guy is talking about, "Dave shut up" dude you shut up the man makes easily the best post grunge out of anyone and your wanting him to STOP! People like you always make the best bands give up on their music. Dave has always made music that he enjoys and its obvious that he does just that on this album. While i cant say its his best one yet because i just got it today and only listened to it once, Its deffintly better than anything else ive heard this year in mainstream besides qotsa and Brian Wilsons smile{ o yea and im a fan of garbage so ill include them on that list also} sorry guilty pleasure.I mean "Hell" has got to be one of the hardest and best rockers in forever and hes so so good on making pop hooks and using his beatle influences so well on the accoustic cd. I dont no how you can hate it, its not like you could have heard it that much since it just came out yesterday maybe if you give it a few more spins you might just maybe enjoy it more, just a thought. For everyone else please buy the cd its GREAT!.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In the tradition of the great double (and in some cases, triple) albums like the Beatles' 'White Album', Pink Floyd 'The Wall', Genesis 'The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway', the Rolling Stones 'Exile on Main Street', Stevie Wonder 'Songs in the Key of Life', George Harrison 'All Things Must Pass', The Who 'Tommy' and 'Quadrophenia', Frank Zappa 'Joe's Garage', Led Zeppelin 'Physical Grafitti', the Clash 'London Calling', Jimi Hendrix 'Electric Ladyland', Derek & the Dominoes 'Layla', Bob Dylan 'Blonde on Blonde', Elton John 'Goodbye Yellow Brick Road' and of recent CD vintage, Guns 'n Roses 'Use Your Illusion I & II' and Smashing Pumpkins 'Mellon Collie and the Inifinite Sadness' -- Foo Fighters 'In Your Honor' over time I feel will be among that list as one of the more interesting, generous outpourings of a band in one record release. The 'one disc electric/one disc acoustic' concept does work well, so far as I am hearing it this night on the Rhapsody online streaming service (and still awaiting B&N to deliver my CD copy this week!) Conventional thinking might have interspersed the twenty tracks to make a more balanced 'electric, then acoustic, then electic...' listening experience, but this is the way they decided to divide up the discs, so it should be listened to in that way, and in its entirety, just like any of those aforementioned classic albums. Disc one will delight and satisfy fans of the band, particular those who liked 'There Is Nothing Left to Lose' and 'One By One' the most - lots of wonderful loud, forceful, melodic invention we've come to enjoy and expect from Grohl & co. Even if 'In Your Honor' was just the electric disc alone, it would still be an amazing album. However once you get to disc two, you will encounter unexpected and revealing sides of the band, and will be further delighted and appreciative of the songwriting, artistry and overall performance standards to which the Foo Fighters hold themselves. It's refreshing to hear such excellence in rock music today, particularly over the course of two CD's. It's hard enough to come up with new ideas and creativity in the tried-and-true guitar/bass/drums foundation of rock music (considering all that's been done by the greats, Led Zeppelin, the Beatles, the Who, Neil Young, U2, Rush, newer entries like Nirvana (of course), Pearl Jam, Stone Temple Pilots, Foo Fighters may just be in a class of their own with the new album. So put 'In Your Honor' in your collection!
Guest More than 1 year ago
this album is absolutely fantastic and it makes feel good inside everytime i hear it.The concept of having one album rock and the other acoustic is brilliant.People that say an album like this is not good don't realize a good sense music.
Guest More than 1 year ago
2005 we still have Foo Fighters kicking more butt every album.This one by far shows there most Talent!!This DOUBLE cd is so amazing I can't stop listening to it!!If you pick it up you might come across stuck on it like me!!Each song if mind blowing!! It sets the mood for your day...you got one ROCK!!!and one Acoustic..you can't go wrong!!!
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