Incest of the Trinity

Incest of the Trinity

5.0 3
by Derek Michael McCann
     
 
An incest survivor copes with his shame and closet homosexuality by plotting the murder of his brother his first sexual experience. He is assaulted by vivid flashbacks from his youth as his subconscious self begins to merge and interfere with his everyday reality. He relies on the church to help him, but his gradual submersion into self-hatred and shame leads him to

Overview

An incest survivor copes with his shame and closet homosexuality by plotting the murder of his brother his first sexual experience. He is assaulted by vivid flashbacks from his youth as his subconscious self begins to merge and interfere with his everyday reality. He relies on the church to help him, but his gradual submersion into self-hatred and shame leads him to believe he is satanically possessed a recent slew of mysterious murders in his neighborhood contribute to his insecurity. His use of mind-altering substances assists him in understanding the greater forces around him, and the drugs grant him a reprieve from cognitive existence. But with his conservative Evangelical upbringing, he struggles to overcome the homosexual paradox and later tries to curtail his drug use, but his thought processes are bombarded by voices of scorn and derision which serve to admonish him into a state of immobilizing pain. He agonizes over the morality question, in that he wants to eradicate his demons by ridding himself of his brother and manages to find himself in dire predicaments where his paranoia envelops him into a corner where he has no alternative but to defend himself.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780595265206
Publisher:
iUniverse, Incorporated
Publication date:
02/28/2003
Pages:
296
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.67(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Incest of the Trinity 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this thing over the weekend and must say that it's a definite page turner. One reviewer mentioned how different the book feels from the first page and I definitely agree with that accessment. The horrors of sexual abuse are cogently drawn here in such incredible detail. The opening scene reminds me of Spielberg's 'Saving Private Ryan' in that it's so intense and breathtaking that you are worn out after reading it. There is a lull (thankfully) after this, but once the novel gets moving there is a sensational amount of tension and anticipation built into every scene. The scene at the Diner (I won't give anything away) was both hilarious and frightening at the same time. With the flashbacks of Boots Satchel's (what a great name for a character)youth interrupting his consciousness every few chapters, one can feel overwhelmed by it, yet you still are enraptured by the detail of the writing and the artsy style of the author. The dramatic ending could not be adequately described in words, but it is a fitting end for magnum opus of originality. I suggest you buy the book and give it a chance. It's worth reading.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I received the book in the mail 2 days ago and found it difficult to get through, not because it's bad, rather the subject matter is so heavy and deep that it deserves a good, deliberate read. The pacing and mood of the book is extraordinarily kept throughout the book and the actual scenes of, what some would call depravity, are so incredibly rendered. The characters are drawn from clay and carved into the image of the author. Derek McCann has an unusual talent when it comes to painting each of his characters and themes and I still can't keep thinking about the book. It stays with you long after your finished. I hope Mr. McCann has alot of success with it and wish him the best.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is quite unique in its presentation. Rather than relying on traditional means of storytelling with linear sequence, it leads through a vertiginous mountain of peaks and valleys with the reader going backwards in time (through flashbanks), then jolted back to the future. And guess what, it works. Many religious people will be offended by the scope and direction this book takes, but I don't think the author means to do so. In addition, many will be left with questions regarding the author's stand on homosexuality as he doesn't seem to take one--which makes it ever better. In general, the vivid and gripping storyline makes it a great read. The final scenes of the book transcend anything I have read for their horror and unabashed naughtiness.