Inclusive Teaching: Creating Effective Schools for All Learners, MyLabSchool Edition / Edition 1

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Overview

Filled with practical strategies and informed by solid theory and research, Inclusive Teaching provides teachers and other educational professionals with tools for building inclusive schools that support all learners in learning well.

The authors approach inclusion using the best practices learned in their general education courses–those founded on a constructivist educational philosophy and designed for diversity–so that students with widely different academic, social-emotional, and sensory-physical abilities can learn together, and learn well.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780205464791
  • Publisher: Allyn & Bacon, Inc.
  • Publication date: 12/23/2004
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 560
  • Product dimensions: 7.50 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Table of Contents

I. INCLUSIVE SCHOOLS & COMMUNITY.

1. TOWARDS THE CELEBRATION OF DIFFERENCE. People with disabilities in school and society.

Welcome!!

PICTURES IN TIME. Shifting possibilities.

DEALING WITH DIFFERENCE. The opportunity to build community.

WHAT DO WE CALL PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES AND WHY? Labels and their uses.

NO PLACE FOR YOU in our community and its schools.

FROM INSTITUTION TO SEGREGATED COMMUNITY-BASED PROGRAMS. The first step towards community participation.

TOWARDS COMMUNITY MEMBERSHIP. Civil rights, inclusion, and self-advocacy.

CALLING FOR SUPPORT. Toward Respect & Community Membership.

2. ENVISIONING THE INCLUSIVE SCHOOL. Schools that educate all children together well.

WHAT IS WRONG HERE? The frustrations of coping with diverse children in a "factory school."

TOWARDS INCLUSIVE SCHOOLING. A glimpse of teaching practices that honor all children.

RESEARCH AND INCLUSIVE SCHOOLING. The effectiveness of inclusive versus segregated education.

INCLUSIVE TEACHING. Key elements of schooling for all children.

SCHOOL REFORM AND INCLUSIVE SCHOOLS. Connecting inclusive education to school improvement.

VISITING TWO INCLUSIVE SCHOOLS. Can this be real?

ONWARD IN OUR JOURNEY. The sun is high, the road is wide.

3. PARTNERING WITH FAMILIES. Building relationships for learning.

TOWARD FAMILY-CENTERED EDUCATION. Building genuine partnerships.

LINK SCHOOL, HOME, AND COMMUNITY LEARNING. Resources for learning and family support.

WELCOME HOME.

4. PLANNING INSTRUCTION FOR DIVERSE LEARNERS. A framework for inclusive teaching and meeting needs of challenging students.

DESIGNING & ADAPTING INSTRUCTION FOR LEARNERS OF DIVERSE ABILITIES. Expecting diversity from the beginning.

PLANNING FOR STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS. Getting help, services, and support.

INDIVIDUALIZED EDUCATION PROGRAMS (IEPs). Referral and planning for special education services.

MAPS—A STUDENT-CENTERED PLANNING PROCESS. Dreams drive the plan of friends, professionals, and family.

OTHER INDIVIDUALIZED PLANS FOR STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS. Families and 504 plans.

GETTING STARTED AND GOING ON.

5. SUPPORT AND COLLABORATION. Getting help and building a school community.

INCLUSIVE GROUPING OF CHILDREN FOR SUPPORT. Starting with an inclusive school community.

STUDENTS HELPING STUDENTS. The power of peers.

COLLABORATIVE TEAMS. Gathering the school community.

SCHOOLWIDE STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES. Using our resources for teacher and students.

COLLABORATIVE TEACHING. Partnerships for student learning.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND GROWTH. Building a professional community of learners.

SUPPORT FOR THE ROAD.

II. INCLUSIVE TEACHING.

The Foundations.

6. THE FOUR BUILDING BLOCKS OF INCLUSIVE TEACHING. Strategies to reach all students.

HOW DO PEOPLE LEARN? How should we teach?

THE 4 BUILDING BLOCKS OF INCLUSIVE TEACHING. Strategies for differentiated learning.

STRETCHING OUR TEACHING. Academic instruction.

7. STUDENTS WITH DIFFERING ACADEMIC ABILITIES. Best practices for meeting student needs in heterogeneous classes.

LABEL JARS NOT PEOPLE. Seeing children and people first.

THE “BEST AND THE BRIGHTEST.”Students people call “gifted and talented.”

THEY CAN'T SPEAK ENGLISH. Students with language and cultural differences.

SMART BUT NOT LEARNING. Students with “learning disabilities.”

FROM “CHRISTMAS IN PURGATORY” TO COMMUNITY MEMBERSHIP. Students with mental retardation.

COMING BACK. Students with traumatic brain injury (TBI).

ALONG THE WAY. Our journey with differently-abled students.

8. EXEMPLARY ACADEMIC LEARNING FOR ALL STUDENTS. Applying the 4 building blocks in best instructional practices.

BEST PRACTICES FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING. Applying the building blocks of inclusive teaching.

LEARNING SKILLS IN MEANINGFUL CONTEXTS. Strategies for including all.

THEMATIC, INTERDISCIPLINARY INSTRUCTION. Organizing instruction around authentic, meaningful topics.

CLASSROOM WORKSHOP.

AUTHENTIC LEARNING IN THE SCHOOL. Linking school to the community.

SMALL GROUP ACTIVITIES. Heterogeneous groups collaborating for learning.

REPRESENTING TO LEARN. Creating as learning.

REFLECTIVE ASSESSMENT. Meaningful demonstrations of learning.

BEST PRACTICES AND ACADEMIC SUBJECTS. Multi-level instruction applied.

MAKING SCHOOLS WORK FOR ALL STUDENTS.

9. ADAPTING ACADEMIC INSTRUCTION. Strategies for meeting special needs.

AN ECOLOGICAL FOUNDATION FOR ADAPTING INSTRUCTION. Matching students and instruction.

STEP 1: UNDERSTAND STUDENT NEEDS. Student profiles for planning.

STEP 2: ANALYZE OUR CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENT. Just how do we teach?

STEP 3: DETERMINE DISCREPENCY BETWEEN STUDENT AND OUR CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENT. What is the real problem?

STEP 4: ADAPT INSTRUCTION TO SOLVE PROBLEM. Strategies for learning.

ADAPTATIONS FOR A 5TH GRADER. Seeing the whole picture.

LEARNING TO ADAPT. Social and emotional learning.

10. STUDENTS WITH BEHAVIORAL AND EMOTIONAL CHALLENGES. Reaching out to maintain and strengthen an inclusive classroom community.

THE WILDEST COLTS MAKE THE BEST HORSES. Attention deficit hyperactive disorder.

A NICE KID BUT TROUBLING SOMETIMES. Serious emotional disturbance.

RAINMAN AND BEYOND. People with autism.

CHALLENGING KIDS AND TEACHING

11. BUILDING A COMMUNITY FOR LEARNING Strategies for strengthening mutual care, support, and celebration.

WHAT IS COMMUNITY? Individual growth thriving with care and support.

WHY BUILD COMMUNITY IN SCHOOLS? Emotions, relationships, and learning.

BUILDING A CULTURE OF COMMUNITY IN THE SCHOOL Adults collaborating and caring.

BUILDING A COMMUNITY OF LEARNERS IN OUR CLASS We value our differences and help one another.

IN THE END: THE GROWING CIRCLES OF COMMUNITY.

12. MEETING NEEDS OF STUDENTS WITH CHALLENGING BEHAVIORS. Positive strategies for difficult situations.

AN EXAMPLE OF JONATHAN. A Kid Out of Control.

CREATING A POSITIVE, STUDENT-CENTERED APPROACH. Struggling against a culture of punishment, rewards, control, and segregation.

CHALLENGING BEHAVIORS. A call for understanding.

PROACTIVE RESPONSES TO SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL CHALLENGES. Beyond punishment and control to choice and care.

IDEA AND BEHAVIORAL CHALLENGES. What the law says.

MOVING ON TO RESPECT. Sensory-physical needs and learning.

13. STUDENTS WITH DIFFERING COMMUNICATION, PHYSICAL, AND SENSORY ABILITIES. Understanding student needs and effective strategies.

COMMUNICATION DISORDERS. Talk matters.

SEVERE & MULTIPLE DISABILITIES. Yes, there is someone there.

DEAF AND HEARING IMPAIRED. Beyond isolation and silence.

BLIND AND VISUALLY IMPAIRED. Seeing a community.

ORTHOPEDIC IMPAIRMENT. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

OTHER HEALTH IMPAIRMENT. From hospital to community.

EMBRACING KIDS WHO LOOK DIFFERENT.

14. DEVELOPING AN INCLUSIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT. Using space and physical resources to support all students.

THE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT. A tool for learning and growth.

THE SCHOOL. Creating a welcoming place for all.

THE CLASSROOM. Designing an inclusive learning community.

THE LOCAL COMMUNITY. Local resources for learning.

TOWARD INCLUSIVE LEARNING PLACES.

15. USING ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY AND MAKING ENVIRONMENTAL ACCOMMODATIONS. Tools that extend human capacity and promote learning.

AN INTRODUCTION TO ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY. Technology expands the limitations of all.

MODIFICATIONS TO THE SCHOOL AND CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENT. Creating access.

FUNCTIONAL APPLICATIONS OF ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY. Using technology to live and learn.

EMBRACING ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY.

III. LEADING CHANGE.

16. TEACHER LEADERSHIP FOR INCLUSIVE SCHOOLING. Creating the schools all children need.

WHAT WE'RE GOING TO FIND. The challenge ahead.

THE LESSONS OF SCHOOL CHANGE. Not easy but worth the trip.

MOVING TOWARDS INCLUSIVE SCHOOLING. Change strategies.

TEACHER LEADERSHIP AND ACTION. We really can make a difference, together.

MAKING CONNECTIONS. Building a network for growth and change.

ONWARD HO!! Toward creating good schools for ALL.

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