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Indeh: A Story of the Apache Wars
     

Indeh: A Story of the Apache Wars

3.0 2
by Ethan Hawke
 

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INSTANT #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

The year is 1872. The place, the Apache nations, a region torn apart by decades of war. The people, like Goyahkla, lose his family and everything he loves. After having a vision, the young Goyahkla approaches the Apache leader Cochise, and the entire Apache nation, to lead an attack against the Mexican village of

Overview

INSTANT #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

The year is 1872. The place, the Apache nations, a region torn apart by decades of war. The people, like Goyahkla, lose his family and everything he loves. After having a vision, the young Goyahkla approaches the Apache leader Cochise, and the entire Apache nation, to lead an attack against the Mexican village of Azripe. It is this wild display of courage that transforms the young brave Goyakhla into the Native American hero Geronimo. But the war wages on. As they battle their enemies, lose loved ones, and desperately cling on to their land and culture, they would utter, "Indeh," or "the dead." When it looks like lasting peace has been reached, it seems like the war is over. Or is it?

INDEH captures the deeply rich narrative of two nations at war-as told through the eyes of Naiches and Geronimo-who then try to find peace and forgiveness. INDEH not only paints a picture of some of the most magnificent characters in the history of our country, but it also reveals the spiritual and emotional cost of the Apache Wars. Based on exhaustive research, INDEH offers a remarkable glimpse into the raw themes of cultural differences, the horrors of war, the search for peace, and, ultimately, retribution. The Apache left an indelible mark on our perceptions about the American West, and INDEH shows us why.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
05/02/2016
Beautiful brushstrokes by Ruth (The Lost Boy) bring the conflict between the Apache and the United States in 1872 to life in a collaboration with actor Hawke that strives to escape Hollywood’s western mythos. Most U.S. troops are shown to be horrible people, as when they hang Apache leader Cochise’s family, but Gen. Oliver O. Howard rides in at the end, saving everyone (for the time being) using his Christian faith. Young Geronimo’s merciless killings combined with the white savior theme feel like a flawed attempt at balance. Ruth’s art, however, is a complete success, using a wash technique to indicate distance and loose line to give flow and movement. Characters of every race are distinctive and the natural backgrounds are breathtaking. Imperfections aside, this respectful approach to America’s shameful history is a good start to further a conversation often neglected. (Jun.)
From the Publisher
"INDEH is brilliant. It's an important and tough and beautiful and brutal book. Hawke and Ruth don't flinch in their recreation of one of our modern continent's most important and mythical creation stories. Please read this important graphic novel. You'll lose yourself in it."—Joseph Boyden"

Ethan Hawke and Greg Ruth's INDEH is haunting, powerful and gorgeous. Every brushstroke, and every word, take readers deeper into this often forgotten corner of America's history and into the soul of the Apache people. Easily one of the best graphic novels of the year."—Jeff Lemire, author of the Essex County trilogy"

A crucial book about a fundamental part of our recent history: America's war to subjugate the Apache. Moving and unforgettable, INDEH puts the lie to every movie about the west you have ever seen."—Philipp Meyer, author of The Son and American Rust: A Novel"

Beautiful brushstrokes by Ruth bring the conflict between the Apache and the United States in 1872 to life in a collaboration with actor Hawke that strives to escape Hollywood's western mythos... this respectful approach to America's shameful history is a good start to fourth a conversation often neglected."—Publisher's Weekly"

Seldom has the brutally escalating Apache War-or any war-been depicted with such breathtaking beauty as it is here."—Booklist"

Ethan Hawke's Hollywood script-worthy storytelling with artist Greg Ruth's realistic illustrations brings of the darkest wars in American history to life."—Cowboys & Indians

Library Journal
02/01/2016
This 1872-set work explains the transformation of visionary young Apache Goyahkla into the fabled Geronimo. A ten-year labor of love for Oscar-nominated actor Hawke and New York Times best-selling author and illustrator Ruth.
School Library Journal
12/01/2016
After burying his massacred family, Goyahkla leads an attack on a Mexican village, where he gets a new name—Geronimo. What follows are years of brutal attacks and counterattacks as the Apache fight for their way of life and the U.S. government tries to subdue them. Hawke focuses mostly on the Apache side of the story, telling it through their eyes to balance the years of historical inaccuracies and Hollywood romanticism. However, he pulls no punches in portraying the violence from both sides and highlights the divided opinions as all involved try to figure out next steps. Ruth's haunting and poignant black-and-white watercolors capture the desolate grandeur of the Southwestern landscape as well as the violence, death, grief, and loss of war. This gut punch of a novel is a necessary addition and serves as a good introduction to the realities of Manifest Destiny and the resulting American westward expansion. Some elements may be confusing to those unfamiliar with the history of the Apache Wars, but a bibliography is included for citations and further reading. VERDICT Beautiful and brutal, this is a heartbreaking look at how the West was really "won."—Jennifer Rothschild, Arlington Public Library, Arlington, VA
Kirkus Reviews
2016-12-07
Hawke (Rules for a Knight, 2015, etc.) and Ruth (The Lost Boy, 2013, etc.) deliver an impressionistic overview of the Apache Wars, fought between the United States Army and several bands of Apache tribes in the southwest territories of mid-1800s America. This graphic novel cruises along a quarter century of conflict, depicting poignant moments in the lives of Apache leaders and warriors and members of the United States Army charged with "civilizing" the land claimed as spoils of the Mexican-American War, land many Apache call home. It's a brutal, bloody time, with violence begetting violence, exemplified by Goyahkla, an Apache warrior who lost his mother, wife, and children to an attack by the Mexican Army and earned a new name from the pleas for mercy of the last man slaughtered in the Apache's revenge raid on a Mexican village ("San Jeronimo…por favor"). Hawke and Ruth interweave this Geronimo origin story and other legends of the era (Cochise escaping arrest by simply cutting an exit through the side of an Army tent; U.S. soldiers torturing and murdering Mangas Coloradas—who had come to negotiate peace—before finally boiling his decapitated head over a campfire) with historical fiction, allowing for some literary license and philosophical dialogue on the politics of settling an already-inhabited land. Bookending the work with the doomed Apache perspective underscores the tragedy and magnitude of the events. An afterword by Hawke explains his personal connection to the material, and a Further Reading section gives the nonfiction roots for the work. The narration is concise and lyrical, perfectly wed to Ruth's wonderfully expressive illustrations, whose gorgeous photorealism—calling to mind the works of Alex Ross—breathes vivid life into the historical material. The paneling gracefully carries both intense action scenes (the book is exceptionally violent) and stirring cutaways (to the majesty and menace of nature). A beautiful, elegiac entree to an era of violent transition.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781401310998
Publisher:
Grand Central Publishing
Publication date:
06/07/2016
Pages:
240
Sales rank:
63,046
Product dimensions:
7.60(w) x 10.10(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

Ethan Hawke is an accomplished actor, screenwriter, film and theatre director, and novelist. He has been nominated for Academy Awards for both acting and writing, a Tony award, and a Drama Desk Award for both acting and directing.

Greg Ruth is a New York Times bestselling author and illustrator of The Lost Boy, and illustrator for Freaks of the Heartland and Conan comics, among others. He lives in Western Massachusetts.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
New York, New York
Date of Birth:
November 6, 1970
Place of Birth:
Austin, Texas
Education:
Attended Carnegie-Mellon University and New York University; no degree

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Indeh: A Story of the Apache Wars 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This books is great! The writing and book is top notch. The other reviews said that the artwork wasn't good, they have no idea what they are talking about.
Charles Wilfong More than 1 year ago
The art was not good. The story was disjointed and difficult to follow. I was disappointed.