×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Indian Education at Carlisle Indian School
     

Indian Education at Carlisle Indian School

by Frances Densmore
 
Nook version of vintage monograph originally published in 1908. Contains lots of great info and illustrations seldom seen in the last 100 years.

Read excerpt -

The intent of Capt. Pratt's "outing system" is to give the Indian a usable knowledge of the English language, and of ordinary farm and household industries together with the advantages of

Overview

Nook version of vintage monograph originally published in 1908. Contains lots of great info and illustrations seldom seen in the last 100 years.

Read excerpt -

The intent of Capt. Pratt's "outing system" is to give the Indian a usable knowledge of the English language, and of ordinary farm and household industries together with the advantages of contact and association not to be had in any Indian school, and the privilege of a share in the best American home life, not to be had in any school. To this end great care is exercised in the selection of suitable homes for pupils, and close supervision over them is maintained while under the guardianship of the school.

The system as it stands today is worthy a moment's study. Boys and girls are encouraged to volunteer for the outing. After they have been assigned to homes, with due consideration of the special needs of both parties, pupil and patron sign the rules which are to govern their relations. It is distinctly understood that the young people are placed out, not as servants, merely, but as pupils, for whose proper care, teaching and oversight their employer is responsible. They are usually treated as members of the family. No associations are knowingly permitted for them that are not helpful and elevating, morally as well as industrially.

A monthly report is required for each pupil in the country, covering every item of health, wages and expenditures. Twice a year each one is visited by an agent of the school, who looks closely into conditions and investigates all complaints. There is at Carlisle a separate office, with three clerks, where the large correspondence is handled and a complete record kept of every "outing."

Nearly all these pupil workers receive wages, except while regularly attending school, which they must do for eighty consecutive days, if out through the year. They are paid fully as much as others receive for similar service. A certain pro¬portion of their wages is allowed them for extra clothing and spending-money, but they are expected to save about three-fourths. The formation of the habit of saving, so foreign to the tradition of the Indian, is thus especially emphasized in the outing.

The letters of both pupils and patrons are very suggestive, and present a graphic picture of the perfectly natural and sometimes close relations that are formed upon a basis of mutual service rendered.

"The best help I ever had," "I feel as if I would like to keep her always," "We shall be exceedingly sorry to part from her."

Product Details

BN ID:
2940015775921
Publisher:
history-bytes
Publication date:
11/22/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
508 KB

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews