The Indian History of an American Institution: Native Americans and Dartmouth

Overview

Dartmouth College began life as an Indian school, a pretense that has since been abandoned. Still, the institution has a unique, if complicated, relationship with Native Americans and their history. Beginning with Samson Occom's role as the first "development officer" of the college, Colin G. Calloway tells the entire, complex story of Dartmouth's historical and ongoing relationship with Native Americans. Calloway recounts the struggles and achievements of Indian attendees and the history of Dartmouth alumni's ...
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The Indian History of an American Institution: Native Americans and Dartmouth

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Overview

Dartmouth College began life as an Indian school, a pretense that has since been abandoned. Still, the institution has a unique, if complicated, relationship with Native Americans and their history. Beginning with Samson Occom's role as the first "development officer" of the college, Colin G. Calloway tells the entire, complex story of Dartmouth's historical and ongoing relationship with Native Americans. Calloway recounts the struggles and achievements of Indian attendees and the history of Dartmouth alumni's involvements with American Indian affairs. He also covers more recent developments, such as the mascot controversies, the emergence of an active Native American student organization, and the partial fulfillment of a promise deferred. This is a fascinating picture of an elite American institution and its troubled relationship-- at times compassionate, at times conflicted--with Indians and Native American culture.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Colin G. Calloway is to be commended for undertaking such an effort in The Indian History of an American Institution: Native Americans at Dartmouth, a work that embodies the complexity demanded by such a story while maintaining a unifying narrative. At the heart of his book is his belief that ‘this college in the woods’ was ostensibly founded for the education of Indian students.” —Review of Higher Education

“The historical context and description of individuals participating in Indian history are strengths of this institutional history of Indians at Dartmouth.” —Choice

“Readers will marvel at how adroitly [Calloway] has weaved his narrative from ‘scattered glimpses’ of Indian students at Dartmouth . . . The result is an admirable account, thoroughly contextualized, of all that can be learned about ‘Indian History’ at Dartmouth to 1970.”—Vermont History

"In clear, engaging prose, Calloway carefully places the fascinating details of this story in the context of developments in the nation and in Indian country. This is a book that should be read and considered by a wise audience in and out of Dartmouth." —Historical New Hampshire

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781584658443
  • Publisher: University Press of New England
  • Publication date: 5/11/2010
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 1,452,825
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

COLIN G. CALLOWAY is John Kimball Jr. 1943 Professor of History and Professor of Native American Studies at Dartmouth College. He is the author of numerous books, including One Vast Winter Count: The Native American West Before Lewis and Clark (2003), which won six best-book awards.
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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction: A School in the Heart of the Indian Country
Eleazar Wheelock and the Indian Charity School, 1743-69
Samson Occom and the Indian Money, 1765-75
Dartmouth, Indians, and the American Revolution, 1775-1800
Dartmouth Men in the Indian Country, 1775-1820
Dartmouth in the Age of Indian Removal, 1820-50
Students from Indian Territory, 1850-85
Charles Eastman, 1858-1939
Indian Symbols and Some Indian Students, 1900-1969
The Return of the Natives, 1970-2010
Conclusion: Eleazar Wheelock Meets Luther Standing Bear
Appendixes
Indian Students at Moor's Charity School
Native Americans at Dartmouth
Notes
Select Bibliography
Index 
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