Indians and English: Facing Off in Early America

Overview

In this vividly written book, prize-winning author Karen Ordahl Kupperman refocuses our understanding of encounters between English venturers and Algonquians all along the East Coast of North America in the early years of contact and settlement. All parties in these dramas were uncertain?hopeful and fearful?about the opportunity and challenge presented by new realities. Indians and English both believed they could control the developing relationship. Each group was curious about the other, and interpreted through...
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Overview

In this vividly written book, prize-winning author Karen Ordahl Kupperman refocuses our understanding of encounters between English venturers and Algonquians all along the East Coast of North America in the early years of contact and settlement. All parties in these dramas were uncertain—hopeful and fearful—about the opportunity and challenge presented by new realities. Indians and English both believed they could control the developing relationship. Each group was curious about the other, and interpreted through their own standards and traditions. At the same time both came from societies in the process of unsettling change and hoped to derive important lessons by studying a profoundly different culture.These meetings and early relationships are recorded in a wide variety of sources. Native people maintained oral traditions about the encounters, and these were written down by English recorders at the time of contact and since; many are maintained to this day. English venturers, desperate to make readers at home understand how difficult and potentially rewarding their enterprise was, wrote constantly of their own experiences and observations and transmitted native lore. Kupperman analyzes all these sources in order to understand the true nature of these early years, when English venturers were so fearful and dependent on native aid and the shape of the future was uncertain.Building on the research in her highly regarded book Settling with the Indians, Kupperman argues convincingly that we must see both Indians and English as active participants in this unfolding drama.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"There is much of interest in this book. . . . Kupperman offers fascinating reinterpretations of people who bridged the two cultures— such as the Pilgrims' self-serving friend Squanto— and the tensions they experienced as a result. . . . her emphasis on cultural contexts and the recovery of Indian agency and endurance make her book representative of much recent work in this field."—Michael P. Winship, Times Literary Supplement. September 22, 2000.

". . . this exceedingly well-argued and well-presented work, with many interdisciplinary insights, will be an essential addition to major public libraries and academic libraries interested in maintaining research collections on cultural encounters."—Library Journal. May, 2000.

"Kupperman has dramatically reconstructed her description of the interface between America's native residents and the English newcomers. . . . she humanizes both cultures as fully cognizant, social, and responsive. . . . The author has resilvered the mirror, reflecting images that will pique scholarly curiosity at every level."—Choice. October, 2000.

"In this book, Kupperman boldly attempts to rescue English colonization in late sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century North America from its still familiar place in the national history of the United States. . . She brings us substantially closer to complexity in the earliest encounters between English colonists and Native Americans. . . Indians and English contributes significantly to rethinking about the discursive nature of identity in early America."—Daniel H. Usner, Jr., Cornell University. William and Mary Quarterly, July 2001

"Indians and English provides a hard look at precolonial stereotypic sources and propaganda, and counters myth in many instances. . . . Recommended reading for American studies students and others interested in this period of American history."—James A. Cox, Midwest Book Review, Sept., 2000.

"Kupperman is illuminating on the subject of acculturation. Her gracefully written book should be well received. . . ."—David Sloan, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville. History: Reviews of New Books. Summer, 2000.

"Karen Kupperman's beautifully written and exhaustively researched book provides an important corrective to current scholarly debates about encounters between the native people of the Atlantic coast and the English in the 17th century." —Kathleen Bragdon, The College of William and Mary

"By carefully revisiting a rich array of primary sources, Karen Kupperman shows us that contemporary observers never spoke with a single voice about early English encounters with Native Americans. Why? Because this first phase of contact was far more complex, long lasting, and central for all concerned than historians have understood. Kupperman's judicious and welcome reappraisal finds that, with regard to the Atlantic coast in the century after 1580, the Indians were strikingly diverse and resourceful; the commentators proved surprisingly numerous and observant, and generations of scholars have been incessantly simplistic and dismissive. Indians and English will encourage renewed thought, study, and discussion that is long overdue."—Peter H. Wood, Duke University

From the Publisher
"Karen Kupperman's beautifully written and exhaustively researched book provides an important corrective to current scholarly debates about encounters between the native people of the Atlantic coast and the English in the 17th century." -Kathleen Bragdon, The College of William and Mary

"By carefully revisiting a rich array of primary sources, Karen Kupperman shows us that contemporary observers never spoke with a single voice about early English encounters with Native Americans. Why? Because this first phase of contact was far more complex, long lasting, and central for all concerned than historians have understood. Kupperman's judicious and welcome reappraisal finds that, with regard to the Atlantic coast in the century after 1580, the Indians were strikingly diverse and resourceful; the commentators proved surprisingly numerous and observant, and generations of scholars have been incessantly simplistic and dismissive. Indians and English will encourage renewed thought, study, and discussion that is long overdue."-Peter H. Wood, Duke University

"There is much of interest in this book. . . . Kupperman offers fascinating reinterpretations of people who bridged the two cultures- such as the Pilgrims' self-serving friend Squanto- and the tensions they experienced as a result. . . . her emphasis on cultural contexts and the recovery of Indian agency and endurance make her book representative of much recent work in this field."-Michael P. Winship, Times Literary Supplement. September 22, 2000.

". . . this exceedingly well-argued and well-presented work, with many interdisciplinary insights, will be an essential addition to major public libraries and academic libraries interested in maintaining research collections on cultural encounters."-Library Journal. May, 2000.

"Kupperman has dramatically reconstructed her description of the interface between America's native residents and the English newcomers. . . . she humanizes both cultures as fully cognizant, social, and responsive. . . . The author has resilvered the mirror, reflecting images that will pique scholarly curiosity at every level."-Choice. October, 2000.

"In this book, Kupperman boldly attempts to rescue English colonization in late sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century North America from its still familiar place in the national history of the United States. . . She brings us substantially closer to complexity in the earliest encounters between English colonists and Native Americans. . . Indians and English contributes significantly to rethinking about the discursive nature of identity in early America."-Daniel H. Usner, Jr., Cornell University. William and Mary Quarterly, July 2001

"Indians and English provides a hard look at precolonial stereotypic sources and propaganda, and counters myth in many instances. . . . Recommended reading for American studies students and others interested in this period of American history."-James A. Cox, Midwest Book Review, Sept., 2000.

"Kupperman is illuminating on the subject of acculturation. Her gracefully written book should be well received. . . ."-David Sloan, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville. History: Reviews of New Books. Summer, 2000.

Library Journal
In Settling with the Indians: The Meeting of English and Indian Cultures in America, 1580-1640, Kupperman contended that the confrontation was considerably more complex than scholars previously thought and urged them to examine how English colonists and Indians learned from one another's cultures and technologies. In her new book, Kupperman synthesizes two decades of research to strengthen her argument that the encounters were not simply a matter of a stronger, more complex culture acting upon a weaker, simpler one. On the contrary, in her view the otherwise self-confident English became somewhat more tentative in approaching the Indians, desperate to obtain stories and other information to explain the need for continued colonial settlement to a curious and skeptical audience back home. One drawback of this wide-ranging book is that it lacks a focus on a single region of America (although the Virginia colony provides many specific examples), but this exceedingly well-argued and well-presented work, with many interdisciplinary insights, will be an essential addition to major public libraries and academic libraries interested in maintaining research collections on cultural encounters.--Charles K. Piehl, Minnesota State Univ., Mankato Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.\
Internet Book Watch
In Indians & English Kupperman states ...in the New World,"Civility, especially among the lower orders, was fragile, hard won, and shallow rooted; as the poet Edmund Spenser remarked, 'It is but even the other daye, since England grewe Civill (p.219)." Thus many early "civilising" colonists were described as degenerate, and tending towards regression. Extreme measures were taken to promote order in Virginia, in 1610, for example. Fear and strict control were necessary according to informed colonial sources like John Rolfe and Sir Thomas Gates of Virginia. Early colonial reports indicated the belief that Americans (natives) would soon embrace European "civility" and Christianity. Yet duplicity of the colonials was implicit. This expectation of treachery by the early colonists was due to the European's assumptions that society and successful government is based on fear rather than cooperation. Of course, expected treachery begot betrayal. One of the comments reported to have been made by Miantonomi, a Narragansett sachem or chief, of Winthrop was "Did ever friends deal so with friends (p. 236)?" Elaborating on the theme of suspicion and fragmented government, Kupperman writes "At no time was there a single hegemonic voice in the Euramerican population (p. 239)." She demonstrates that European colonists and Native Americans developed a complex history of interactions from the beginning contacts in 1580 to the 1600's. Both viewed the other culture as fully human, she believes. However, problematic interactions may have occurred because of fear of eradication. Indians & English provides a hard look at precolonial stereotypic sources and propaganda, and counters myth in many instances. Painfulas the bloody history may be to remember, light shed upon it may release new pathways of understanding and responsibility so needful to this time. Recommended reading for American studies students and others interested in this period of American history. On the Trail of Elder Brother: Glous'gap Stories of the Micmac Indians Retold by Michael B. Running Wolf (Micmac Nation) & Patricia Clark Persea Books 171 Madison Avenue, New York, New York 10016 ISBN
—Internet Book Watch
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780801482823
  • Publisher: Cornell University Press
  • Publication date: 4/28/2000
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 642,993
  • Product dimensions: 5.91 (w) x 8.88 (h) x 0.76 (d)

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations vii
Preface ix
Introduction 1
1 Mirror Images 16
2 Reading Indian Bodies 41
3 Indian Polities 77
4 The Names of God 110
5 Village Life 142
6 Incorporating the Other 174
7 Resisting the Other 212
Notes 241
Index 291
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