Indigo Slam (Elvis Cole Series #7)

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Overview

When fifteen-year-old Teri Hewitt pleads with Elvis to find the father who abandoned her and her two younger siblings, his first reaction is to turn the case over to the California department of social services. But when he sees that Teri has the lives and care of her little family well in hand, he decides to take the job, asking Joe Pike to help him keep an eye on the kids. The missing dad, Clark Hewitt, is an unemployed printer whose personal history is hard to pin down; as Elvis investigates, the image of ...
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Indigo Slam (Elvis Cole Series #7)

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Overview

When fifteen-year-old Teri Hewitt pleads with Elvis to find the father who abandoned her and her two younger siblings, his first reaction is to turn the case over to the California department of social services. But when he sees that Teri has the lives and care of her little family well in hand, he decides to take the job, asking Joe Pike to help him keep an eye on the kids. The missing dad, Clark Hewitt, is an unemployed printer whose personal history is hard to pin down; as Elvis investigates, the image of Hewitt that emerges indicates a chronically unemployed drug addict who slums through the criminal world, not a bona fide printer but a master counterfeiter. The clues soon send Elvis to Hewitt's home town, Seattle, where Elvis runs afoul of both the newly emerging Russian Mafia and U.S. Federal Marshals as he discovers more about the elusive deadbeat dad. In the meantime, Lucy Chenier comes to L.A. to interview for a television job she wants badly. This will mean her moving to Elvis's town, and will cement the seriousness of their relationship. But things get complicated when her ex-husband shows up at Elvis's office, claiming that Lucy still loves him and that he won't permit her to leave Louisiana. Just as Joe Pike has just about had it with babysitting, the bad guys converge in a breathtaking chase at Disneyland, and the novel comes to its unbearably suspenseful climax. With characteristic hilarity and wit, Robert Crais makes Indigo Slam his most compelling book yet.
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Laid-back shamus Elvis Cole goes after a father who's run out on his kids -- then finds out that they were a lot safer when their dad was away. Crais's seventh novel, his most tense and inventive yet, still manages to be as sunny as the first six.

—Tom Leitch

Publishers Weekly - Cahners\\Publishers_Weekly
At the end of this wild ride, Vietnamese revolutionaries, Russian assassins and federal operatives are all part of a tense face-off. Not surprisingly, wisecracking L.A. shamus Elvis Cole is stuck right in the middle of things. At the start, Elvis is approached by three resourceful young children who would like their missing father located. That dad, Clark Hewitt, is soon revealed as a mystery man, a master printer and a possible junkie who fled the witness protection program he entered after informing on a counterfeiting operation run by Russian and Ukrainian mobsters. While Clark's kids clearly revere him, Elvis is suspicious. The feds want Clark back in their care and the Russians want revenge for his squealing. The final wrinkle comes in the shape of a Vietnamese family who want Clark to run off a stack of phony dong to wreak havoc on their country's economy. Elvis wants his lady love, Lucy, to move to L.A., but her possessive ex-husband has other ideas. Lurking under the trademark slick patter is a plot that gradually achieves a persuasive momentum. The taciturn Joe Pike, co-owner with Elvis of their detective agency, helps Elvis come up with a wild gambit that might make everyone happy, with the possible exception of the trigger-happy Russians. Never forgetting that wall-to-wall cuteness can't carry a novel unaided, Crais (Lullaby Town; Sunset Express) provides sympathetic and believable kids, a flawed father figure and a bunch of Vietnamese heavies with a softer side-all of whom rocket along until they interlock smoothly at the big finish.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
At the end of this wild ride, Vietnamese revolutionaries, Russian assassins and federal operatives are all part of a tense face-off. Not surprisingly, wisecracking L.A. shamus Elvis Cole is stuck right in the middle of things. At the start, Elvis is approached by three resourceful young children who would like their missing father located. That dad, Clark Hewitt, is soon revealed as a mystery man, a master printer and a possible junkie who fled the witness protection program he entered after informing on a counterfeiting operation run by Russian and Ukrainian mobsters. While Clark's kids clearly revere him, Elvis is suspicious. The feds want Clark back in their care and the Russians want revenge for his squealing. The final wrinkle comes in the shape of a Vietnamese family who want Clark to run off a stack of phony dong to wreak havoc on their country's economy. Elvis wants his lady love, Lucy, to move to L.A., but her possessive ex-husband has other ideas. Lurking under the trademark slick patter is a plot that gradually achieves a persuasive momentum. The taciturn Joe Pike, co-owner with Elvis of their detective agency, helps Elvis come up with a wild gambit that might make everyone happy, with the possible exception of the trigger-happy Russians. Never forgetting that wall-to-wall cuteness can't carry a novel unaided, Crais (Lullaby Town; Sunset Express) provides sympathetic and believable kids, a flawed father figure and a bunch of Vietnamese heavies with a softer sideall of whom rocket along until they interlock smoothly at the big finish. (June)
Library Journal
Having made it big with his last Elvis Cole mystery (Sunset Express, Hyperion, 1996), Crais here puts Cole on the track of a missing father who seems to have criminal connections.
Kirkus Reviews
Three years after the witness relocation program hustled his family out of Seattle seconds away from some men with guns, Clark Hewitt is on the run again—but this time he hasn't taken his family with him. So his eldest daughter Teri, 15 going on 40, leads her two siblings into Elvis Cole's office waving a fat sheaf of bills in Cole's face as a retainer for tracking down her father. In a way, the case is a no-brainer. It doesn't take Cole (Sunset Express, 1996, etc.) long to establish that Clark has gone back to Seattle, and by the time he reports to the children, their dad's already returned. But everything Cole's found out in his search spells trouble: Clark is a druggie and a counterfeiter who'd turned state's evidence against Russian mobsters who are now bent on killing him and his kids, and he can't turn to the feds this time because he's gone back to printing funny money. Things are no better on Cole's own home front. His girlfriend, Baton Rouge attorney Lucy Chenier, is angling for a job that'll keep her as close to Cole's body as she is to his heart, but her powerful ex-husband steps in just in time to queer the deal. Cole will have to keep him, the feds, and the Russians at bay long enough to cruise into a Disneyland finale that screams movie movie movie.

Sure, Cole works his easy charm to the max. But since he's riding Crais's twistiest and best sustained plot with all the panache of John Travolta, it's a pleasure to see him enjoying his work more than any other p.i. in California history.

From the Publisher
"The ensuing action is suspenseful...spending a few fast-paced hours with Indigo won't give you the blues."—People Magazine

"[Elvis] Cole works his easy charm to the max. But since he's riding Crais's twistiest and best-sustained plot with all the panache of John Travolta, it's a pleasure to see him enjoying his work more than any other P.I. in California history."—Kirkus Reviews

"Crais provides sympathetic and believable kids, a flawed father figure and a bunch of heavies with a softer side-all of whom rocket along until they interlock smoothly at the big finish."—Publishers Weekly

"Suffused with wry humor, lots of action, and some devilishly clever plot twists, Indigo Slam is the most satisfying detective novel I've read in a while."—Miami Herald

"[A] witty and hilarious caper."—St. Louis Post-Dispatch

"Indigo Slam hits high gear...Those new to the Elvis Cole series will be converts. Existing fans will welcome Indigo Slam."—BookPage

"[Elvis] Cole is one of those characters who has a smart line for almost every situation, but Crais takes care to let his humanity show through."—San Francisco Chronicle

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780345435644
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 2/4/2003
  • Series: Elvis Cole Series , #7
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 110,974
  • Product dimensions: 4.17 (w) x 6.90 (h) x 0.81 (d)

Meet the Author

Robert Crais
Robert Crais lives in Los Angeles and is the author of many New York Times bestsellers, including The First Rule, The Sentry, the #1 bestseller Taken, and Suspect. In 2014 the Mystery Writers of America honored Robert Crais with the Grand Master Award.

Biography

Los Angeles is known as the city of dreams, largely because so many Americans dream of breaking into the Hollywood film and television industry. In 1976, Robert Crais went west from Louisiana to pursue that very dream. As it turned out, he became one of the lucky few to break into the industry in a big way. Crais has since written for such hugely popular TV shows as Quincy, Cagney and Lacey, Miami Vice, Hill Street Blues, and L.A. Law, just to name a few. However, after achieving such success (which included a prestigious Emmy nomination) in a business that so many would give everything to break into, Robert Crais decided to step away and pursue his true dream. Frustrated by the collaborative process that comes with screenwriting, and inspired by pulp-pioneers such as Raymond Chandler, Crais became a mystery novelist. With his massively popular Elvis Cole/Joe Pike mysteries series, it seems as though success has a funny way of following Crais no matter what he decides to do.

Crais published his very first novel in 1987. The Monkey's Raincoat introduced mystery fans to Elvis Cole and Joe Pike, a pair of L.A. private investigators who would become his most-beloved recurring characters. Crais's transition from screenwriting to novel-writing was an astoundingly smooth one. The Monkey's Raincoat earned him nominations for the Edgar, Anthony, Shamus, and Macavity awards, winning both the Anthony and Macavity for "Best Novel of the Year." Crais's publisher was so overjoyed by the novel's success that he encouraged Crais to keep the Cole/Pike team going. "I started writing these books to get away from writing other people's concepts, like TV and movies," Crais told Barnes&Noble.com. "I never expected to write these guys as a series...but the book proved to be so popular and the characters were so popular that my publisher wanted more." What followed was a series of bestselling mysteries, including Stalking the Angel (1989), Free Fall (1993), L.A. Requiem (1999), and last year's The Forgotten Man.

Although the series was not part of Crais's original plan, he still seems to hold the Cole and Pike team closer to his heart than anything he has previously written. He explained, "The characters have deepened, and I think they kind of reflect what's going on with me and the world as I see it." When asked about whether or not we can expect to see the crime-solving buddies on the big screen anytime soon, he said, "I think I would have a difficult time in the collaborative process when other people suddenly put their fingerprints on Elvis and Joe," further illustrating his personal feelings for his P.I. team.

As much as Crais loves his series, he does occasionally write novels outside of the Cole/Pike world. His latest, The Two-Minute Rule, tells the story of career criminal Max Holman, a recently released-from-prison bank robber who finds himself hunting an entirely different kind of criminal after his son is gunned down. The book has since raked in positive reviews from such publications as Booklist, Publisher's Weekly, and The Library Journal. While The Two-Minute Rule does not feature Cole and Pike, Crais fans will notice one significant similarity between his latest novel and his famous series -- the Los Angeles setting. "I can't think of a better place to set crime novels because of what Los Angeles is. Los Angeles is the main where the nation goes to make its dreams come true. When you have a place like that where so many people are risking their very identities, not just money and cash, but they're risking who they are because it's their hopes and dreams, when you have that kind of tension and that kind of friction, you can't help but have crime."

Fortunately, Crais will never have to succumb to such friction and tension since, for a success story such as he, Los Angeles completely lived up to its promise of being the city of dreams.

Good To Know

Some fun and fascinating outtakes from our interview with Crais:

"My first job was cleaning dog kennels. It was especially, ah, aromatic during those hot, humid Louisiana summers, but it prepared me for Hollywood."

"My fiction is almost always inspired by a character's need or desire to rise above him-or herself. No one is perfect and some of us have much adversity in our lives; it is those people who struggle to rise above their nature or background that I find the most interesting and heroic."

"Fun details? Like Elvis Cole, I have a dry sense of humor. Sometimes I am so dry that people don't know I'm kidding and think I'm being serious. I enjoy this because their reactions are often funny. Also, I wear beautifully colored shirts like Elvis Cole, only I was wearing them before him. People will say, ‘Look, RC dresses just like Elvis Cole,' and I'll say, 'No, Elvis Cole dresses like me!' I also wear sunglasses like Joe Pike, but not indoors and not at night."

"Elvis Cole wrote two episodes of television. No lie. It happened like this: I had written episodes of Miami Vice and Jag that were rewritten by person or persons unknown -- changed so badly that I didn't want my name on them, so I used Elvis Cole's name as a pen name."

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    1. Hometown:
      Los Angeles, California
    1. Date of Birth:
      June 20, 1953
    2. Place of Birth:
      Baton Rouge, Louisiana
    1. Education:
      B.S., Louisiana State University, 1976; Clarion Writers Workshop at Michigan State University
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

It was plant day in the City of Angels. On plant day I gather the plants that I keep in my office and take them out onto the little balcony I have overlooking West Los Angeles, where I clean and water and feed them, and then spend the remainder of the afternoon wondering why my plants are more yellow than green. A friend who knows plants once told me that I was giving them too much water, so I cut their rations in half. When the plants turned soft as well as yellow, another friend said that I was still drowning them, so I cut their water in half again. The plants died. I bought new plants and stopped asking other people's advice. Yellow plants are my curse.

I was sneering at all the yellow when Lucy Chenier said, "I don't think I'll be able to get away until much later, Elvis. I'm afraid we've lost the afternoon."

"Oh?" I was using a new cordless phone to talk to Lucille Chenier from the balcony as I worked on the plants. It was in the low eighties, the air quality was good, and a cool breeze rolled up Santa Monica Boulevard to swirl through the open French doors into my office. Cindy, the woman in the office next to mine, saw me on the balcony and made a little finger wave. Cindy was wearing a bright white dress shirt tied at the belly and a full-length sarong skirt. I was wearing Gap jeans, a silk Tommy Bahama shirt, and a Bianchi shoulder holster replete with Dan Wesson .38-caliber revolver. The shoulder holster was new, so I was wearing it around the office to break in the leather.

Lucy said, "Tracy wants me to meet the vice president of business affairs, but he's tied up with the sales department until five." Tracy was Tracy Mannos, the station manager of KROK television. Lucy Chenier was an attorney in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, but she had been offered a job by KROK here in Los Angeles. She had come out for three days to discuss job possibilities and contract particulars, and tonight was her last night. We had planned to spend the afternoon at the Mexican marketplace on Olvera Street in downtown LA. Los Angeles was founded there, and the marketplace is ideal for strolling and holding hands.

"Don't worry about it, Luce. Take all the time you need." She hadn't yet decided if she would take the job, but I very much wanted it to happen.

"Are you sure?"

"Sure, I'm sure. How about I pick you up at six? We can go for an early dinner at Border Grill, then back to the house to pack." Border Grill was Lucy's favorite.

"You're a dream, kiddo. Thanks."

"Or, I could drive over and pull the veep out of his meeting at gunpoint. That might work."

"True, but he might hold it against me in the negotiation."

"You lawyers. All you think about is money."

I was telling Lucy how rotten my plants looked when the outer door opened and three children stepped into my office. I cupped the receiver and called, "Out here."

The oldest was a girl with long dark hair and pale skin and little oval glasses. I made her for fifteen, but she might have been older. A younger boy trailed in behind her, pulling a much smaller girl. The boy was wearing oversized baggy shorts and Air Nike sneakers. He looked sullen. The younger girl was wearing an X-Files T-shirt. I said, "I'm being invaded."

Lucy said, "Tracy just looked in. I have to go."

The older girl came to the French doors. "Are you Mr. Cole?"

I held up a finger, and the girl nodded. "Luce, don't worry about how long it takes. If you run late, it's okay."

"You're such a doll."

"I know."

"Meetcha outside the building at six."

Lucy made kissy sounds and I made kissy sounds back. The girl pretended not to hear, but the boy muttered something to the younger girl. She giggled. I have never thought of myself as the kissy-sound type of per-son, but since I've known Lucy I've been doing and saying all manner of silly things. That's love for you.

When I turned off the phone, the older girl was frowning at my plants. "When they're yellow it means they get too much sun."

Everyone's an expert.

"Maybe you should consider cactus. They're hard to kill."

"Thanks for the advice."

The girl followed me back into my office. The younger girl was sitting on the couch, but the boy was inspecting the photographs and the little figurines of Jiminy Cricket that I keep on my desk. He squinted at everything with disdain, and he carried himself with a kind of round-shouldered skulk. I wanted to tell him to stand up straight. I said, "What's up, guys? How can I help you?" Maybe they were selling magazine subscriptions.

The older girl said, "Are you Elvis Cole, the private investigator?"

"Yes, I am." The boy snuck a glance at the Dan Wesson, then eyed the Pinocchio clock that hangs on the wall above the file cabinet. The clock has eyes that move from side to side as it tocks and is a helluva thing to watch.

She said, "Your ad in the Yellow Pages said you find missing people."

"That's right. I'm having a special this week. I'll find two missing people for the price of one." Maybe she was writing a class report: A Day in the Life of the World's Greatest Detective.

She stared at me. Blank.

"I'm kidding. That's what we in the trade call private-eye humor."

"Oh."

The boy coughed once, but he wasn't really coughing. He was saying "Asshole" and masking it with the cough. The younger girl giggled again.

I looked at him hard. "How's that?"

The boy went sullen and floated back to my desk. He looked like he wanted to steal something. I said, "Come away from there."

"I didn't do anything."

"I want you on this side of the desk."

The older girl said, "Charles." Warning him. I guess he was like this a lot.

"Jeez." He skulked back to the file cabinet, and snuck another glance at the Dan Wesson. "What kind of gun is that?"

"It's a Dan Wesson thirty-eight-caliber revolver."

"How many guys you kill?"

"I'm thinking about adding another notch right now."

The older girl said, "Charles, please." She looked back at me. "Mr. Cole, my name is Teresa Haines. This is my brother, Charles, and our sister, Winona. Our father has been missing for eleven days, and we'd like you to find him."

I stared at her. I thought it might be a joke, but she didn't look as if she was joking. I looked at the boy, and then at the younger girl, but they didn't appear to be joking either. The boy was watching me from the corner of his eye, and there was a kind of expectancy under the attitude. Winona was all big saucer eyes and unabashed hope. No, they weren't kidding. I went behind my desk, then thought better of it and came around to sit in one of the leather director's chairs opposite the couch. Mr. Informal. Mr. Unthreatening. "How old are you, Ms. Haines?"

"I'm fifteen, but I'll be sixteen in two months. Charles is twelve, and Winona is nine. Our father travels often, so we're used to being on our own, but he's never been gone this long before, and we're concerned."

Charles made the coughing sound again, and this time he said, "Prick." Only this time he wasn't talking about me.

I nodded. "What does your father do?"

"He's in the printing business."

"Unh-hunh. And where's your mother?"

"She died five and a half years ago in an automobile accident."

Charles said, "A friggin' drunk driver." He was scowling at the picture of Lucy Chenier on my file cabinet, and he didn't bother to look over at me when he said it. He drifted from Lucy back to the desk, and now he was sniffing around the Mickey Mouse phone.

I said, "So your father's been gone for eleven days, he hasn't called, and you don't know when he's coming back."

"That's right."

"Do you know where he went?"

Charles smirked. "If we knew that, he wouldn't be missing, would he?"

I looked at him, but this time I didn't say anything. "Tell me, Ms. Haines. How did you happen to choose me?"

"You worked on the Teddy Martin murder." Theodore Martin was a rich man who had murdered his wife.

I was hired by his defense attorneys to work on his behalf, but it hadn't gone quite the way Teddy had hoped. I'd been on local television and in the Times because of it. "I looked up the newspapers in the library and read about you, and then I found your ad in the Yellow Pages."

"Resourceful." My friend Patty Bell was a licensed social worker with the county. I was thinking that I could call her.

Teri Haines took a plain legal envelope from her back pocket and showed it to me. "I wrote down his birth date and a description and some things like that." She put it on the coffee table between us. "Will you find him for us?"

I looked at the envelope, but did not touch it. It was two-fifteen on a weekday afternoon, but these kids weren't in school. Maybe I would call a lieutenant I know with the LAPD Juvenile Division. Maybe he would know what to do.

Teresa Haines leaned toward me and suddenly looked thirty years old. "I know what you're thinking. You're thinking that we're just kids, but we have the money to pay you." She pulled a cheap red wallet from her front pocket, then fanned a deck of twenties and fifties and hundreds that was thick enough to stop a 9mm Parabellum. There had to be two thousand dollars. Maybe three. "You see? All you have to do is name your price."

Charles said, "Jeezis Christ, Teri, don't tell'm that! He'll clean us out!" Charles had moved from the Mickey phone and now he was fingering the Jiminys again. Maybe I could handcuff him to the couch.

Teri was looking at me. "Well?"

"Where'd you get the money?"

Her right eye flickered, but she did not look away. "Daddy leaves it for us. It's what we live on."

Teresa Haines's hair hung loosely below her shoulders and appeared clean and well kept. Her face was heart-shaped, and a couple of pimples had sprouted on her chin, but she didn't seem self-conscious about them. She appeared well nourished and in good health, as did her brother and sister. Maybe she was making all of this up. Maybe the whole thing was their idea of a joke. I said, "Have you called the police?"

"Oh no." She said it quickly.

"If my father was missing, I would."

She shook her head.

"It's what they do, and they won't charge you. I usually get around two grand."

Charles yelled, "Ripoff!" A small framed picture fell when he said it, and knocked over three Jiminy figurines. He scuttled toward the door. "I didn't do anything. Jeezis."

Teresa straightened herself. "We don't want to involve the police, Mr. Cole." You could tell she was struggling to be calm. You could see that it was an effort.

"If your father has been gone for eleven days and you haven't heard from him, you should call the police. They'll help you. You don't have to be afraid of them."

She shook her head. "The police will call Children's Services, and they'll take us away."

I tried to look reassuring. "They'll just make sure that you guys are safe, that's all. I may have to call them myself." I spread my hands and smiled, Mr. Nothing-to-Be-Afraid-of-Here, only Teri Haines didn't buy it. Her eyes cooled, growing flinty and hard and shallow with fear.

Teresa Haines slowly stood. Winona stood with her. "Your ad said confidential." Like an accusation.

Charles said, "He's not gonna do frig." Like they'd had this discussion before they came, and now Charles had been proven right.

"Look, you guys are children. You shouldn't be by yourselves." Saying it made me sound like an adult, but sounding that way made me feel small.

Teresa Haines put the money back in the wallet and the wallet back in her pocket. She put the envelope in her pocket, too. "I'm sorry we bothered you."

I said, "C'mon, Teresa. It's the right way to play it."

Charles coughed, "Eat me."

There was a flurry of fast steps, and then Teresa and Charles and Winona were gone. They didn't bother to close the door.

I looked at my desk. One of the little Jiminys was gone, too.

I listened to Cindy's radio, drifting in from the balcony. The Red Hot Chili Peppers were singing "Music Is My Aeroplane." I pressed my lips together and let my breath sigh from the corners of my mouth.

"Well, moron, are you just going to let them walk out of here?" Maybe I said it, or maybe it was Pinocchio.

I pulled on a jacket to cover the Dan Wesson, ran down four flights to the lobby, then out to the street in time to see them pull away from the curb in a metallic green Saturn. The legal driving age in the state of California is sixteen, but Teresa was driving. It didn't surprise me.

I ran back through the lobby and down to the parking level and drove hard up out of the building, trying to spot their car. A guy in a six-wheel truck that said leon's fish almost broadsided me as I swung out onto Santa Monica Boulevard, and sat on his horn.

I was so focused on trying to spot the Saturn that I didn't yet see the man who was following me, but I would before long.

2

Teresa Haines's Saturn turned south past the West Hollywood Sheriff's Station, then east onto Melrose. I didn't careen through oncoming traffic to cut her off, and I didn't shoot out her tires. Teri Haines was driving just fine, and I wasn't sure what to do if I stopped them. Hold them at gunpoint for the police?

Fairfax High School was just letting out, and the sidewalks were dotted with boys toting book bags and skateboards, and girls flashing navel rings. Most of the kids were about Teri's age, some younger, some older, only these kids were in school and she wasn't. Charles leaned out of the passenger-side window and flipped off a knot of kids standing at the bus stop. Three of the kids gave back the finger, and somebody threw what appeared to be a Coke can which hit the Saturn's rear wheel.

Teri cruised along Melrose past hypermodern clothing outlets and comic-book shops and tour groups from Asia until she turned south onto a narrow residential street. Modest stucco houses lined the street, and the curbs were jammed with parked cars. Some of the cars probably went with the houses, but most belonged to people who'd come to shop on Melrose. I stopped at the corner and watched. The Saturn crept halfway down the next block, then turned into the drive of a yellow bungalow with an orange tile roof and a single royal palm in the yard. The three Haines children climbed out of the car and disappeared into the bungalow. Retreating to familiar territory after an unsuccessful meeting with the detective.

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Sort by: Showing all of 18 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 17, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Robert Crais can do no wrong in my eyes. I love Elvis Cole. 

    Robert Crais can do no wrong in my eyes. I love Elvis Cole. 

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  • Posted February 25, 2014

    Love Robert Crais! I'm always excited when his new release come

    Love Robert Crais! I'm always excited when his new release comes out and this one didn't disappoint. The title was so catchy and couldn't wait to find out how it could have been chosen. He is a talented writer, keeps the story moving, exciting and interesting. Enjoyed this book very much.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2008

    An Interesting Book, Just a little confusing

    This book was very intense, i read this book because my mom is a Crais fan and i didn't have anything to read. It was very good once i got into the thick plot. Very, Very thrilling

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